• 21 Real talk – a novel evidence-based, video-based communication skills training resource.

      Parry, Ruth; Whittaker, Becky; Pino, Marco; Watson, Sharan; Hamlyn, Sarah; Faull, Christina; University of Nottingham; Loughborough University; LOROS Hospice; DeMontfort University; et al. (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 2018-03-01)
      Background Much palliative care communication training draws on sparse evidence about practice. Yet training’s effectiveness depends on the strength of its underpinning evidence. An empirical, observational science of language and social interaction – ‘Conversation Analysis’ holds great promise because: it is generating copious evidence on communication, and healthcare–communication specifically; shows role–played interactions differ from authentic ones in fundamentally important ways; recent quantitative evaluations of interventions based on conversation analytic findings have shown effectiveness. Within a research and training development programme, we designed novel training resources – ‘Real Talk’ incorporating research findings and clips from video-recorded hospice consultations. We designed Real Talk to complement rather than replace existing resources. We report a preliminary evaluation of Real Talk’s strengths and weaknesses. Method Mixed-methods, qualitative evaluation entailing observations, interviews, and participant-completed feedback questionnaires. Results We collected data from 11 events, 10 trainers across England, and 150 trainees. Conclusions Trainees and trainers alike appreciated the video clips and their authentic nature. Observations and reports indicated Real Talk was particularly effective for encouraging participants to both emotionally engage with the nature of palliative care, and actively engage in discussion and overall learning about communication practices. Trainers used the video clips more than they did the research findings components; with a similar pattern seen in most trainees’ feedback. Our decision to design Real Talk for trainers to use without initial intensive training meant we could rapidly and widely distribute the resources and evaluate their use. However, this also meant heavy reliance on trainers’ existing facilitation skills, and on their allocation of adequate time to familiarise themselves with the materials. We argue that this is also why the research findings-based components were not put to full use by trainers. We are revising Real Talk and its delivery on the basis of our evaluation.
    • Development, validity and reliability testing of the East Midlands Evaluation Tool (EMET) for measuring impacts on trainees’ confidence and competence following end of life care training

      Whittaker, Becky; Parry, Ruth; Bird, Lydia; Watson, Sharan; Faull, Christina; University of Nottingham; LOROS; University of Derby (2017-07-20)
      Objectives: There has been a wide range of education development within end of life care and polices both in the UK and internationally recommend education as a means to increasing competence in end of life care delivery (LACDP, 2014; Gamondi C, Larkin P, Payne S, 2013). Whilst the gold standard means of assessing the impact of training, is to perform before and after workplace observations of staff and patients interacting, this would be highly time consuming and costly. The need to develop a time efficient, reliable and flexible evaluation questionnaire was identified. The East Midlands Evaluation Tool (EMET), for measuring effects of end of life care training events on trainees’ self-reported confidence and competence was developed, tested and validated, as a collaborative project across the region.
    • Development, validity and reliability testing of the East Midlands Evaluation Tool (EMET) for measuring impacts on trainees’ confidence and competence following end of life care training

      Whittaker, Becky; Parry, Ruth; Bird, Lydia; Watson, Sharan; Faull, Christina; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 2017-02-02)
      Abstract Objectives To develop, test and validate a versatile questionnaire, the East Midlands Evaluation Tool (EMET), for measuring effects of end of life care training events on trainees’ self-reported confidence and competence. Methods A paper-based questionnaire was designed on the basis of the English Department of Health's core competences for end of life care, with sections for completion pretraining, immediately post-training and also for longer term follow-up. Preliminary versions were field tested at 55 training events delivered by 13 organisations to 1793 trainees working in diverse health and social care backgrounds. Iterative rounds of development aimed to maximise relevance to events and trainees. Internal consistency was assessed by calculating interitem correlations on questionnaire responses during field testing. Content validity was assessed via qualitative content analysis of (1) responses to questionnaires completed by field tester trainers and (2) field notes from a workshop with a separate cohort of experienced trainers. Test–retest reliability was assessed via repeat administration to a cohort of student nurses. Results The EMET comprises 27 items with Likert-scaled responses supplemented with questions seeking free-text responses. It measures changes in self-assessed confidence and competence on 5 subscales: communication skills; assessment and care planning; symptom management; advance care planning; overarching values and knowledge. Test–retest reliability was found to be good, as was internal consistency: the questions successfully assess different aspects of the same underlying concept. Conclusions The EMET provides a time-efficient, reliable and flexible means of evaluating effects of training on self-reported confidence and competence in the key elements of end of life care
    • Real talk facilitator manual: Engaging patients with end of life talk

      Parry, Ruth; Whittaker, Becky; Pino, Marco; Land, Vicky; Faull, Christina; Feathers, Luke; Watson, Sharan; Loughborough University, LOROS Hospice Leicestershire, University of Derby; University of Nottingham, The Health Foundation, NIHR (Real Talk, 2019-03-01)
      Video-based communication training- engaging patients in end of life talk. ‘Real Talk’ is a novel and flexible communication training resource designed to use in face-to-face training events. It features real-life video recordings of UK hospice care, and learning points based on cutting-edge communication science. Real Talk has been developed as part of a research programme, and aims to enhance the quality and effectiveness of evidence-based communication skills training in the area of end of life care. The research programme is called VERDIS, which refers to video-based research and training on supportive and end of life care interactions.