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Recent Submissions

  • A smartphone app for improving mental health through connecting with urban nature

    McEwan, Kirsten; Richardson, Miles; Sheffield, David; Ferguson, Fiona; Brindley, Paul; University of Sheffield; University of Derby (MDPI, 2019-09-12)
    In an increasingly urbanised world where mental health is currently in crisis, interventions to increase human engagement and connection with the natural environment are one of the fastest growing, most widely accessible, and cost-effective ways of improving human wellbeing. This study aimed to provide an evaluation of a smartphone app-based wellbeing intervention. In a randomised controlled trial study design, the app prompted 582 adults, including a subgroup of adults classified by baseline scores on the Recovering Quality of Life scale as having a common mental health problem (n = 148), to notice the good things about urban nature (intervention condition) or built spaces (active control). There were statistically significant and sustained improvements in wellbeing at one-month follow-up. Importantly, in the noticing urban nature condition, compared to a built space control, improvements in quality of life reached statistical significance for all adults and clinical significance for those classified as having a mental health difficulty. This improvement in wellbeing was partly explained by significant increases in nature connectedness and positive affect. This study provides the first controlled experimental evidence that noticing the good things about urban nature has strong clinical potential as a wellbeing intervention and social prescription.
  • A heuristic model of supervision using small objects to develop the senses

    Bird, Drew; University of Derby (Iris Publishers, 2019-07-31)
    The research explores how the conceptual frame of Heuristic inquiry can inform non-verbal exploration in psychotherapy supervision practices. The author explores their practice as a dramatherapist and how small objects can broaden the awareness of the supervisees own relationship patterns. Small objects helped to re-conceptualise the therapeutic dynamic using metaphor and make conscious parts of the supervisee experience they had been unaware.
  • Liver ultrasound scans.

    Mortimore, Gerri; Mayes, JP; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2019)
    Ultrasound scans can be used in a variety of settings to examine internal organs, muscle, joints, tendons and lesions or to monitor foetal growth and development during pregnancy. Ultrasound, is arguably the most frequently requested form of imaging especially within the gastroenterology department. However, to elucidate a cause of abdominal pain, distension, jaundice, abnormal liver function tests; abdominal ultrasound is one of the easiest, quick and cost-effective ways to do so. In addition, ultrasound can assist the practitioner to rule out other considered differential diagnoses. Since the advent of advanced clinical practitioner roles, nurses are increasingly taking on advanced clinical roles within the field of gastroenterology. With these advanced roles, nurses and other allied health professionals, can act autonomously in the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of patients, which includes the ability to order different tests and investigations, which can comprise of radiological and ultrasound requests. However, it is not just the ordering and requesting of radiological and ultrasound scans, but the requirement to understand the scan report and the ability to deal with the findings in an appropriate and timely fashion, that is vital for improving patient care. This article will focus on abdominal ultrasound, with emphasis on liver ultrasound scans. It will discuss what an ultrasound scan is, and some of the terminology used in liver ultrasound reports. In addition, it will compare ultrasound images of normal liver to abnormal and explore the importance of background information which should be presented on the request form, to aid the sonographer or radiologist in their interpretation of the scan.
  • Nutrition and malnutrition in liver disease: an overview.

    Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2019-07-17)
    The term malnutrition is generally understood to refer to a deficiency of nutrition, and it is rarely appreciated that malnutrition can also result from excesses in nutritional status. Relatively recent clinical practice guidelines (CPG) from the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) (Merli et al, 2019) acknowledged that malnutrition includes both nutritional surplus and deficiency, but stated that, for the purpose of the CPG, malnutrition would be referred to as undernutrition.
  • Primary Biliary Cholangitis: an update on treatment.

    Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2019-07-17)
    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary cirrhosis, is a chronic but progressive disease that, over many years, causes damage to bile ducts, leading to cholestasis and, in some patients, cirrhosis. The rate at which PBC progresses varies from person to person, but significant damage takes decades to occur. It predominately affects women aged 40–60 years with a female to male ratio of 9:1, but can affect anyone from the age of 20. There is no cure for PBC other than liver transplant, but medications can be given to slow down disease progression and for the treatment of symptoms. Health professionals should monitor for complications, including the development of osteoporosis, vitamin deficiencies and liver cirrhosis, which caries the associated complications of portal hypertension, varices and ascites
  • On Being a Male Dramatherapist

    Holmwood, Clive; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-07-11)
    This chapter seeks to consider from a phenomenological, systemic and attachment based perspective both training in a female dominated profession and the impact of being a male dramatherapist working with families and children for the last 20 years. It will consider from a philosophical and pragmatic perspective such questions as should male therapists work with young female survivors of sexual abuse? Can male therapists build a more positive therapeutic relationship with adolescent males who have sexually offended? To what extent can the male arts therapists represent a positive role model to adolescents with absent fathers? This chapter will attempt to lift the lid on taboos around what being a male arts therapist is really about and what they should or should not be doing in their work and why by revisiting assumptions about the role of the male therapist and maleness in the therapeutic space. It will begin to delve into areas that the male taboos around the subject areas has never ventured before.
  • Online learning as a vehicle for social change.

    Robertshaw, David; University of Derby (2016-07)
    Online learning as a vehicle for social change, how education can change lives. David looks at how the introduction of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses is changing the face of education and making it accessible for everyone to learn.
  • Changing attitudes with a MOOC on dementia

    Kotera, Yasuhiro; Robertshaw, David; University of Derby (Sciendo, 2019-07-12)
    Dementia is one of the most significant issues of our time and there are varying prevailing attitudes towards dementia, including negative stigma and perception. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are a widely available online learning resource accessed for free which may present an opportunity to address prevailing attitudes. We conducted a questionnaire before and after a six-week MOOC where participants learned about dementia. We collected data using a survey instrument and analysed them with statistical testing. Although there was no statistically significant change between pre- and post-MOOC questionnaires, the change was observed in some questions and for particular groups. Our findings indicate this MOOC has a greater effect on changing the attitudes of non-healthcare workers, older people and those living in the United Kingdom. We recommend further analysis of MOOC as a change intervention and consideration of their application in other disciplines.
  • Primary biliary cholangitis: symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

    Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (MA Healthcare, 2019-06)
    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary cirrhosis, is a chronic but progressive disease that, over many years, causes damage to bile ducts, leading to cholestasis and, in some patients, cirrhosis. The rate at which PBC progresses varies from person to person, but significant damage takes decades to occur. It predominately affects women aged 40–60 years with a female to male ratio of 9:1, but can affect anyone from the age of 20. There is no cure for PBC other than liver transplant, but medications can be given to slow down disease progression and for the treatment of symptoms. Health professionals should monitor for complications, including the development of osteoporosis, vitamin deficiencies and liver cirrhosis, which caries the associated complications of portal hypertension, varices and ascites.
  • Are we missing a trick? Why is occupational therapy not talking about the role and development of assistant practitioners?

    Biggam, Amanda; University of Derby (2019-06-17)
    The aim of this poster is to present a scoping of recent literature around the role of assistant practitioners within healthcare, and to present the argument that as a profession we need to be more proactive in developing the skills and knowledge of our support staff. Recently, there has been a drive to develop the nursing associate role to help fill the gap between healthcare support workers and registered nurses. Clear guidance on standards of proficiency have been developed; with the role being registered by the NMC aligning it with the nursing family (NMC, 2018). Within allied health professions, literature reviews highlight that Radiography have embraced the formal development of their support workers, with the Society of Radiographers producing a scope of practice (Johnson, 2012) and a clear career pathway from assistant practitioner to registered radiographer. Occupational therapy, however, does not appear in the recent literature to be researching the impact and benefits of the assistant practitioner role. This poster will allow consideration of the barriers and opportunities for a more defined role of assistant practitioners within occupational therapy. Evidence suggests that the formalisation of an occupational therapy based assistant practitioner, with a coherent training and development opportunities, ensures the success of this role (Wheeler, 2017). This poster will aim to generate discussion about how empowering existing staff to complete a foundation degree will not only recognise our existing workforce but will positively impact on our clients’ clinical outcomes.
  • Cultivating self-belief

    Jinks, Gavin; Harber, Denise; University of Derby (International conference on education and new developments, 2019-06)
    The two presenters have very different backgrounds. Gavin Jinks is a senior lecturer in social work. Denise Harber has been a teacher, head-teacher and school adviser. Both have concluded that the ability to create self-belief in a student group, be they primary school pupils or students in higher education, is fundamental to their achievements. Gavin has been the project leader for an award winning student mentoring project on the BA Applied Social Work at the University of Derby. Denise Harber was an adviser on a team that designated a primary school in the south of England as a 'cause for concern'. She then took on the role of Head-teacher and led the school to be designated as good in a subsequent Ofsted inspection. Underpinning both of these pieces of work was a commitment to develop the self-belief of the students. This was seen as being a fundamental building block in bringing about real change in the achievements of both the students and the pupils concerned. This workshop will explore how Gavin and Denise went about these pieces of work. They will explore the transferability of these ideas to other educational settings and situations, particularly settings with traditionally low academic engagement. They will also be encouraging participants to consider how it might be possible for them to cultivate a culture of self-belief in their own students/pupils.
  • A partnership approach to student mentoring

    Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Forum for Peer Learning, 2019-06)
    In 2015 as Year 1 Tutor on the BA Applied Social Work I initiated a student mentoring project with the aim of increasing the support to Year 1 students. In that first year I recruited 5 student mentors from Years 2 and 3 to support incoming Year 1 students. Fast forward to 2018 and the project has grown very significantly. There are now 42 mentors, they are Year 2 and Year 3 students with a handful of graduates now in employment. Mentoring is now offered to students on all 3 years of the programme. The mentor support has a number of strands to it: A Facebook group for each of the 3 years of the programme. The Facebook group for each year has mentors from the year above so that students can raise questions and queries with peers who have the ‘been there, done that’ factor. The Facebook groups are not overseen by academic staff. This highlights a fundamental element of the project, that mentors are trusted to undertake the role. The Year 1 Facebook group is set up in the summer before their studies commence. Induction for Year 1 and Year 2 students is largely run by mentors. The mentors create activities and presentations for mentees on a range of topics. Again the mentors are trusted to prepare and present these presentations without academic interference. All Year 1 and Year 2 students have a named mentor who they can contact for guidance when they would like to talk to a peer rather than a tutor. Students who have been very successful in module assessments are invited to give guidance to students undertaking those modules the following year. All decision are made between myself and the mentors. The project won a Union of Students award in 2018.
  • Primary biliary cholangitis: symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

    Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (MAG Healthcare, 2019-06)
    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary cirrhosis, is a chronic but progressive disease that, over many years, causes damage to bile ducts, leading to cholestasis and, in some patients, cirrhosis. The rate at which PBC progresses varies from person to person, but significant damage takes decades to occur. It predominately affects women aged 40–60 years with a female to male ratio of 9:1, but can affect anyone from the age of 20. There is no cure for PBC other than liver transplant, but medications can be given to slow down disease progression and for the treatment of symptoms. Health professionals should monitor for complications, including the development of osteoporosis, vitamin deficiencies and liver cirrhosis, which caries the associated complications of portal hypertension, varices and ascites.
  • Right hypochondrial pain leading to a diagnosis of cholestatic jaundice and cholecystitis: a review and case study.

    Redfern, Vicky; Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (MA Healthcare, 2019-06-19)
    The gallbladder stores bile from the liver and releases it into the duodenum. Imbalance in bile components (typically, cholesterol) can lead to cholelithiasis, the crystallisation of choleliths (gallstones). Cholelithiasis is common, affecting a fifth of people in Western countries. The stones can become lodged in the biliary duct and obstruct bile flow. Bile obstruction affects levels of bilirubin, causing cholestatic jaundice. Associated symptoms include nausea, dark urine and pale stools. Gallstones can also cause cholecystitis, the inflammation of the gallbladder. They also often cause pain (biliary colic), especially sudden-onset, episodic, radiating right hypochondrial pain, and biliary pathology is the main cause of upper abdominal pain. Diagnosing these presentations requires a multispectral, holistic assessment comprising numerous investigations, including clinical history, liver function tests, Murphy's sign and abdominal ultrasound. Treatment is usually gallbladder removal surgery (laparoscopic cholecystectomy), with either bile duct exploration or endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). Good nurse–patient communication is essential to ensure quality of care. The case study presented here covers the assessment and biliary diagnosis of a female patient presenting with severe right hypochondrial pain. The review of existing evidence and the case study should help hepatobiliary nurses deliver quality care for patients presenting with symptoms of gallstones.
  • Student-generated video creation for assessment: can it transform assessment within Higher Education?

    Hawley, Ruth; Allen, Cate; University of Derby (De Gruyter, 2018-12-31)
    Student-generated video creation assessments are an innovative and emerging form of assessment in higher education. Academic staff may be understandably reluctant to transform assessment practices without robust evidence of the benefits and rationale for doing so and some guidance regarding how to do so successfully. A systematic approach to searching the literature was conducted to identify relevant resources, which generated key documents, authors and internet sources which were thematically analysed. This comprehensive critical synthesis of literature is presented here under the headings of findings from literature, relevance of digital capabilities, understanding the influence of local context and resources, and pedagogical considerations. Student-generated video creation for assessment is shown to have several benefits, notably in supporting development of digital and communication skills relevant to today’s world and in enhancing learning. As an emerging innovation within assessment, intentionally planning and supporting a change management process with both students and staff is required. The importance of alignment to learning outcomes, context and resources, choice of video format to desired skills development, and to relevance beyond graduation is emphasised for video creation in assessment to be used successfully. Video creation for assessment is likely to grow in popularity and it is hoped the evidence of benefits, rationale and guidance as to how to do this effectively presented here will support this transformation. Further research to consider video creation for assessment with individuals rather than collaborative group assessments, and to establish academic rigour and equivalence would be beneficial.
  • The experiences and meanings of recovery for Swazi women living with ‘Schizophrenia’

    Nxumalo Ngubane, Siphiwe; McAndrew, Sue; Collier, Elizabeth; University of Salford (Wiley, 2019-05-01)
    Globally, twenty-four million people live with schizophrenia, 90% living in developing countries. While most Western cultures recognise service user expertise within the recovery process this is not evident in developing countries. In particular, Swazi women diagnosed with schizophrenia experience stigma from family, community and care providers, thus compromising their recovery process. This study aimed to explore the experiences and meanings of recovery for Swazi women living with schizophrenia Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis was used. Fifteen women were recruited from Swaziland National Psychiatric Hospital out patients’ department, and face to face interviews were conducted. Four super-ordinate themes were identified: (1) The emotionality of ‘illness of the brain’; (2) Pain! Living with the illness and with others; (3) She is mad just ignore her; and (4) Being better. Discussion focuses on the findings of this study and a number of positive and negative implications emanating from them; labelling, stigma and the roles of family, culture and religious beliefs on the process of recovery. This study provides practitioners with insight into the importance of the socio-cultural context of the lives of women diagnosed with schizophrenia and how, in understanding this, mental health care could be improved.
  • Patient experience of venesection: results from a small cohort study

    Mortimore, Gerri; university of Derby (RCN, 2019-04-12)
    Small qualitative cohort study looking at patients perceptions of living with genetic haemochromatosis from diagnosis to treatment.
  • Applying best practice: the venesection clinics of the future

    Mortimore, Gerri; university of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-04-13)
    Discussed patient experiences of venesections and trying to get it right first time across venesection departments across the country.
  • Pre-nursing care experience and implications for its role in maintaining interest and motivation in nursing

    Whiffin, Charlotte; Baker, Denise; Nichols, Julia; Pyer, Michelle; Henshaw, Lorraine; University of Derby; University of Northampton (2019)
    In response to the Government’s mandate to give aspirant student nurses front line care experience before commencing a programme of nurse education, the East-Midlands participated in a national pilot programme to recruit aspirant nurses into HCA roles. Here, we discuss research evaluating our programme of pre-nursing care experience and explore the findings relating to how this programme maintained participant’s interest and motivation in nursing. We then discuss these findings within the context of current policy drivers within the NHS today.
  • Alcohol- is it all that bad?

    Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (The Hypocratic Post, 2018-02-05)
    According to a YouGov poll, 3.1 million people in the UK planned to take part in Dry January this year and give up alcohol. With January now behind us, how many people will continue to abstain or cut back on their alcohol intake, and who will choose to hop back off the wagon? The answer to this question is very dependent on how much we drink or, in other words, the total amount of alcohol units we consume. Of course, many of us who regularly consume alcohol don’t really think about the units we drink unless we are contemplating driving. I think many people will be shocked to realise that they are drinking many more units than is recommended by the Department of Health.

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