• Co-creating value in desert tourism experiences

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Al-Qasmi, Idrees; Melpignano, Claudia; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-01-21)
      This study investigates the determinants of value co-creation in desert camps in Oman from both the customers' and the camp managers' perspectives. The concept of value co-creation in hospitality and tourism has been investigated in a range of ways in the extant literature. However, limited attention has been paid in the process of value co-creation in remote and unique destinations such as desert camps. This research focuses on 5 aspects of value co-creation which are then explored both quantitatively and qualitatively. The findings of the study indicate that within the context of desert camps, value co-creation is influenced by authenticity, engagement, place attachment, and marketing though the value-in-use concept. However, the level of this influence varies between the customers and the camp managers. Finally, findings are discussed in the light of this variance to identify and provide recommendations that enhance value co-creation in the desert camps of Oman.
    • Community-based tourism in the developing world: Community learning, development & enterprise

      Wiltshier, Peter; Clarke, Alan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-10-16)
      This book analyses community-based approaches to developing and regenerating tourism destinations in the developing world, addressing this central issue in sustainable tourism practices. It reviews a variety of systems useful for analysing and understanding management issues to offer new insight into the skills and resources that are needed for implementation, ongoing monitoring and review of community-based tourism. Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, this book explores alternatives to the dominant interpretation which argues against tourism as a benefit for community development. International case studies throughout the book illustrate and vouch for tourism as a transformative force while clarifying the need to manage expectations in sustainable tourism for community development, rejuvenation and regeneration. Emphasis is placed on accruing relevant decision-support material, and creating services, products and management approaches that will endure and adapt as change necessitates. This will be of great interest to upper-level students, researchers and academics in the fields of tourism impacts, sustainability, ethics and development as well as the broader field of geography.
    • The complexity of decision-making processes and IoT adoption in accommodation SMEs

      Pappas, Nikolaos; Caputo, Andrea; Pellegrini, Massimiliano Matteo; Marzi, Giacomo; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Sunderland; University of Trento, Italy; University of Lincoln; University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Italy; University of Lincoln; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-01-18)
      The current competitive scenario is fast-moving toward an integration of sophisticated technological innovations, i.e. smart solutions for hospitality, in particular the accommodation industry. Internet of Things (IoT) technologies are able to connect and let communicate different devices to craft a personalized customer experience. Given the undeniable impact for the hospitality sector, the decisions about adopting smart solutions are not always linear: benefits and limitations co-exist and need to be weighed against each other. By adopting fsQCA, this paper compares several decision-making factors that may influence the willingness to adopt IoT, surveying owners/managers in the Greek accommodation industry. Results show four types of decision-making: (i) rational, a weighted evaluation of risks and opportunities; (ii) enthusiast, mostly highlighting benefits to gain a competitive advantage; (iii) cautious, emphasizing risks and barriers to innovate; and (iv) futurist, a consideration of future technological necessities related to the increasing digitalization.
    • Conserving Italian World Heritage Sites through live music events: Exploring barriers and opportunities

      Azara, Iride; Melpignano, Claudia; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication, 2019-09-18)
      Consumers’ demands for innovative forms of heritage consumption combined with a desire for long lasting memories have highlighted the role that staged events and other live music performances at cultural and historical sites can play in the conservation of these assets. However, to date, research on these aspects remains fragmented and indeed lacking within the Italian landscape. Building on these considerations, this paper explores the tensions inherent the re-use and conservation of Italian cultural and historical assets through live events. The research uses three WHS sites distributed across the Italian territory as case studies to identify the positions of different stakeholders involved in the production of live music performances. A qualitative, comparative, case study design has been deemed as the most fitting to enable an in-depth investigation of the stances held by public and private sector organisations involved in the staging of events at WHS and to enable a rich analysis of the issues. Findings show significant ideological and cultural barriers impacting the use of staged live events at such venues. Besides suggesting a cross-sectorial cooperative approach to help rejuvenate these WH sites and to generate funding for conservation purposes findings suggest the need to develop a sustainable strategy for managing national heritage assets incorporating clear guidelines on the re-use of WH sites.
    • A content analysis for government’s and hotels’ response to COVID-19 pandemic in Egypt

      Islam, Salem; Elshwesky, Zakaria; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Technology and Applied Sciences, Salalah, Oman; Alexandria University, Egypt; University of Derby (SAGE, 2021-04-13)
      Drawing on the Situational Crisis Communication theory (SCCT), this study recapitulates the initiatives, practices, and responses of the Egyptian government and chain-managed five-star hotels during the COVID-19 global health pandemic. Subjective and objective content analysis is employed in this study. Subjective content analysis is employed to examine newspapers, magazines, T.V channels, and official pages on Facebook to determine the initiatives and practices adopted by the Egyptian government. Objective content analysis is further used to determine the COVID-19 hospitality practices adopted by 22 chain-managed five-star hotels by examining their official websites. Thematic saturation was attained when observations and analyses exhibited no new themes. Findings indicated that the Egyptian government and chain-managed five-star hotels implemented a number of initiatives and practices focused on financial policies, health and hygiene, workforce and training, marketing, domestic tourism, booking flexibility, cancellation policies, community support, vacations, and contracts. This study contributes to crisis management research by being one of the first studies to explore governments and hotel operations practices and initiatives during the COVID-19 using Egypt as a case study. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications during and post the COVID-19.
    • Corporate social responsibility at LUX* resorts and hotels: Satisfaction and loyalty implications for employee and customer social responsibility

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, Derby Business School; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; University of Coventry (MDPI AG, 2020-11-22)
      Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) remains a hot topic in management. Yet, little is known about how well managers, employees and consumers are responding to CSR initiatives to align with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Underpinned by well-established theories, this study develops a single integrative model of managers’, employees’ and consumers’ CSR. Data were collected from the LUX* group of resorts and hotels located on three Indian Ocean islands: Mauritius, Reunion and the Maldives. Structural equation modelling was employed. Findings reveal: (1) organizational CSR is positively related to employee social responsibility; (2) organizational CSR is negatively associated with customer social responsibility; (3) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer social responsibility; (4) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer delight; (5) customer social responsibility is positively related to customer satisfaction; and (6); customer social responsibility is positively related to customer delight. Strategic CSR initiatives with a multi-stakeholder engagement approach are discussed. Keywords: corporate social responsibility; stakeholder engagement; employee; customer satisfaction; loyalty
    • COVID-19 place confinement, pro-social, pro-environmental behaviors, and residents’ wellbeing: a new conceptual framework

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Frontiers, 2020-09-01)
      Residents’ wellbeing in the present COVID-19 global health crisis requires a deeper understanding to determine appropriate management strategies to promote sustainable behaviors and contribute to human and planetary health. Residents’ behavior can have a profound influence in contributing to personal and global community’s health by responding effectively to emergency strategies in disease outbreaks such as the Coronavirus. It is evident that an understanding of residents’ behavior(s) pre COVID-19 across fields have relied on over-simplistic models, many of which will need to be revisited. Our interaction with people and nature while respecting social distancing has profound positive impacts on our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing. The current health pandemic has called that people be confined in their homes across many nations as a means to control the spread of the virus and save lives. This calls for research exploring the mechanisms; this paper develops and proposes a conceptual framework suggesting that place confinement promotes pro-social and household pro-environmental behaviors which could become habitual and contribute further to our people’s and our planet’s health. Some evidence shows that human connectedness to place may contribute to engagement in desirable behaviors. Interaction with other members of the household can help create meanings leading to collective actions promoting psychological wellbeing. Promoting hygienic behaviors in the household (frequent hand washing) while at the same time being conscious not to keep the water flowing when not required would contribute to a range of benefits (health, financial, biospheric, altruistic) and promote wellbeing. Engaging in pro-social behaviors may result in positive effects on psychological wellbeing, reducing mental distress giving rise to a sense of attachment and belongingness, trust and overall life satisfaction. Engaging people in low-effort pro-environmental behavior to maintain some levels of physical activity and biological harmony with natural environmental settings (e.g. gardening) may help reduce anxiety and distress. This is the first study exploring the interplay of relationships between place confinement, pro-social behavior, household pro-environmental behaviors, place attachment as a multi-dimensional construct and presenting their relationships to residents’ wellbeing. Behavioral change interventions are proposed to promote lifestyle change for people’s wellbeing and broader societal benefits.
    • Creating and storing a toolkit for pilgrimage and religious tourism sites.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (Dublin Institute of Technology, 2017)
      This paper reflects our abiding interest in our origins and of those religious and pilgrimage spaces that we attest to actively being part of our cultural inheritance. It explores options for, and barriers to, the creation of a repository of information to support practitioners and the clergy to maintain and develop these religious and pilgrimage sites. A model toolkit for storing collected knowledge is presented with illustrative examples from a range of sources. The examples used are largely drawn from a Northern / Western perspective.
    • Derby Cathedral as a beacon: the role of the Church of England in tourism management.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (2015)
      In this research the role of the Cathedral is as a beacon inspiring and guiding community development. Good practice case studies in community collaboration, like the Cathedral's, are perceived as central and critical to the success of regeneration and development. The philosophical approach used engages the paradigms of community development (Moscardo, 2014; Ness, 2014; Goodson and Phillimore, 2012; Gilchrist and Taylor, 2011). A bottom-up, endogenous approach to development is perceived to deliver unique selling points to the community. An exogenous and centralist approach is perceived to deliver standardised outcomes that may not encourage actors to develop distinctive and special features for future strategies. This report measured the strength of the Cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of Derby, in delivering community outcomes that reflect both the values, beliefs and aims of the Church of England and of the city. At the same time it identifies the structures required within the Cathedral to support these aims and objectives. A participatory action approach, rooted in social constructivism, is used to frame the investigation into delivery and operation (Mayo et al., 2013). With the active encouragement of participants at the Cathedral and within other specific organisations located in the City the future requirements of strategy and operations to deliver exceptional outcomes that encompass the good practices are explored. This approach incorporates analysis of community's beliefs, expectations and values. The model then creates a framework for supporting, advocating and co-creating a development agenda that has the Cathedral at its core. The model reflects on the achievements of the Cathedral, the structure needed to make those achievements, it sells the strategy for people to operate it, and it tells the stories of that strategy to reflect the output and outcomes and concludes with indicators for future development by the Cathedral. The paper concludes reflecting the increased social capital that is created in this approach.
    • Destination marketing and visitor experiences: the development of a conceptual framework

      Jiang, Y; Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 13/11/2015)
      When confronted with increasingly experienced, demanding, and sophisticated visitors, destination marketers may find it problematic to succeed in destination marketing. This article attempts to address this challenge through the exploration of the relationship between destination image and two critical indicators of successful destination marketing: visitor delight and place attachment. It integratesdisparate themes in destination marketing and recognizes the relationshipsbetween marketing stimuli, customer experiences, and marketing outcomes. A comprehensive and coherent theoretical model is established to explain the complexities involved in the formation of important destination marketing outcomes. This article critically examines fun and customer orientation as two key concepts of visitor experiences and proposes them as principal mechanisms that mediate the relationship between destination image and visitor responses (visitor delight and place attachment). The article’s theoretical contributions, limitations, and practical implications for tourism authorities and destination marketers are discussed
    • Destination spas and the creation of memorable guest experiences

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2018-07-30)
    • Distributed leadership in DMOs: a review of literature and directions for future research

      Hristov, Dean; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Naumov, Nick; University of Northampton; University of Derby; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa; Nexford University, Washington DC, USA (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-27)
      Amidst key emergent challenges for Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) and destinations triggered by changes in the funding and governance landscape for tourism on a global scale, Distributed Leadership (DL) has emerged as a promising concept to provide a collaborative framework for channelling resources and leadership to cope with such changes. Current evidence from academic literature discussing the importance of embedding shared forms of leadership is scarce and few studies discuss the application of DL in the context of DMOs. The key purpose of the following conceptual study is to provide a critical overview of key DL contributions in the mainstream and DMO academic literature. The study seeks to examine the relevance of DL in the context DMOs with the purpose to stimulate future empirical investigations in the application of DL in DMO organisations.
    • Edible insects and their acceptance in western societies

      Jauniskis, Pijus; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2020-11-27)
      This paper examines current literature on edible insect consumption in western culture through an inductive lens, addressing environmental, nutritional, food security, anthropological and psychological aspects of the topic. Findings show that western aversion towards edible insects is deeply psychological and cultural, mostly ignoring the pleasure dimensions such as taste, texture and flavour. The nature of the problem appears to be predominantly social. Results suggest that a beneficial route of introducing edible insects into the western diet could be formed through a societal perspective. Tourism and hospitality can potentially play a big part in the edible insect development. For instance, food as a tourism product can attract visitors from different backgrounds whilst food consumption as a tourism experience subliminally promises an experience of novelty and potential newfound pleasure in food. Food as an integral part of various cultures and local heritages entails local dishes that can be considered ‘cultural artifacts’ and their consumption symbolises the consumption of ‘other’. Tourism experiences can expose an individual to lasting personal change, self-discovery and intellectual development. Hence, taking into consideration that acquiring new cultural knowledge increases openness to experience, it is possible that tourism could contribute to adopting the practice of insect consumption in the western cultural sphere.
    • Employing a value-belief-norm framework to gauge Carthage residents’ intentions to support sustainable cultural heritage tourism

      Megeihi, Huda El; Woosnam, Kyle Maurice; Ribeiro, Manuel Alector; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Denley, Tara Joyce; University of derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-03-16)
      In light of the recent conflicts in Carthage over land use, Cultural heritage preservation, and sustainable tourism, this work utilized a value-belief-norm (VBN) theoretical framework to consider psychological antecedents of residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. As such, personal values, cultural worldview, awareness of consequences, ascription of responsibility, and subjective norms were considered antecedents of intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. Data were collected from 475 Carthage residents in nine neighborhoods adjacent to UNESCO World Heritage Sites using an on-site self-administered questionnaire. The proposed model was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (to demonstrate sound psychometric properties across all 11 factors within the model), followed by structural equation modelling. Overall, 15 of the 19 proposed hypotheses were supported, ultimately contributing to 28% of the variance explained in residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. This work not only provides support for the utilization of the VBN model within the context of cultural heritage tourism, it also deepens our understanding of the theoretical framework through the inclusion of the multi-dimensional construct cultural worldview.
    • Environmentally and financially sustainable tourism

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; Monash University; Curtin University ((ICHRIE Research Reports) Richmond VA USA: International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional EducationICHRIE, 2018-12-20)
    • Evaluating the effectiveness of wipe for wildlife and its campaign elements

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G.; Monash University (01/2014)
    • An evaluation of practitioners’ views of consultancy and applied research at the University of Derby

      Edwards, Mike; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (2013)
      The aim of this research has two objectives; firstly, to evaluate the development of cognitive, transferable and intellectual skills in Higher Education students, secondly, to transfer that knowledge by means of collaboration with community organisations. Experiential learning and regeneration/diversification project work is needed by all communities. The collaboration is built upon our ability to provide graduates and a community with portfolios of independent evidence of achievement obtained from working with a partner organisation. The work-related learning supports the Community Charitable Trust “New Opportunities Wirksworth” in the market town of Wirksworth, Derbyshire through the delivery of specially negotiated work-based learning. Teaching, learning and assessment in Higher Education use problem-based learning, especially in vocation-specific domains that is usually undertaken using a constructivist approach. Such constructivist methodologies are often predicated, for students and for teachers, on the delivery of experiential, entrepreneurial and applied skills. Students are seen as short-changed if they are not engaging with Problem Based Learning from lecturers working at the ‘frontiers of knowledge’. We also acknowledge that Problem Based Learning provides an opportunity for producing outcomes in new knowledge for students and communities that is highly usable when compared to memory-based learning . So, in this research we directed and managed a cadre of students to consider PBL as experiential and practical learning. The project meets the contemporary employability agenda through the application of PBL and knowledge transfer to our specific organisation, ‘Wirksworth NOW!’. The outcomes and outputs of the collaboration have applications in NOW’s core cluster components for community regeneration: arts, creative industries and culture, trade and tourism, education and training, youth. Keywords Problem-based
    • Event portfolio management: theory and methods for event management and tourism

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ziakas, Vassilios; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; Plymouth Marjon University; University of Calgary (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
      Event Portfolio Management' explores the phenomenon of the event portfolio as a policy tool for cities and destinations. Divided into two parts – ‘Theory’ and ‘Practice’ – the book critically analyses and summarises key underpinnings behind portfolio theory development and identifies key trends and issues in the event portfolio approach. It examines the processes of event portfolio development and management, leveraging, stakeholder networking and collaboration, portfolio design, risk assessment and evaluation. With a wide geographical reach, the book introduces the results of empirical research from different international case studies, including Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin in New Zealand, Canberra and Melbourne in Australia, and Manchester and Edinburgh in the UK.