• Sector-focused approach to business events in Manchester

      Vokacova, Zuzana; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
    • Selling the total spa product

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
      Retail sales can contribute significantly to a spa’s revenue, however, many spas do not realise their full retail potential. This chapter presents strategies to maximise retail sales, including: brand selection, brand ambassadors, incentives, training, retail design and visual merchandising to provide a tool kit for success. Consideration is also given to the importance of integrating retail throughout the entire customer journey. A case study is presented at the end of the chapter to encourage the application of knowledge. Selling experiences is seen as the principal function of a spa (Wuttle and Cohen, 2008), nevertheless, retail and other sales such as up-selling and link selling can all make significant contributions to a spa’s revenue. In exploring approaches to selling, the benefits of, and barriers to, selling are presented as well as strategies to maximise sales. The chapter is therefore essentially a more practically based one, but needs to be read in conjunction with the chapters on consumer behaviour, guest service and journey and marketing spas.
    • Small cities with big dreams: creative placemaking and branding strategies

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-12)
    • Social customer relationship management: A customer perspective

      Dewnarain, Senika; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; University of Derby; Curtin Mauritius, Charles Telfair Campus, Mauritius; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Taylor & Francis, 2021-04-13)
      The availability of many social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online review sites such as Trip Advisor has led to the emergence of a new concept known as social customer relationship management (SCRM) or CRM 2.0. This is defined as a business strategy of engaging customers through social media with the goal of building trust and brand loyalty (Greenberg, 2010; Li et al., 2020; Rita & Moro, 2018), SCRM provides traditional customer relationship management for online customers by shifting the focus from a transactional outlook to one that centers on customer experiences (Dewnarain et al., 2019a; Sigala, 2018; Touni et al., 10 2020; Zhang et al., 2019).
    • Social customer relationship management: an integrated conceptual framework

      Dewnarain, S; Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 15/10/2018)
      In recent years, the concept of customer relationship management (CRM) has undergone a major change from being a strategy that focused solely on establishing financial bonds with customers to one that promotes both transactional and interactional relationships with customers. This has given rise to a new form of CRM which is known as social customer relationship management (SCRM) or CRM 2.0. Hence, this study develops and proposes a conceptual model to address relationships between customer relationship management, social media technologies, customer engagement, positive word of mouth and brand loyalty. This paper brings significant contributions to hospitality CRM literature and marketing communication theory. It serves as a reference for hospitality practitioners who can derive insights on the potential economic advantage such as brand loyalty and consumer behaviour benefits in the form of positive word of mouth which can result from the effective implementation of a SCRM strategy.
    • Social involvement and park citizenship as moderators for quality-of-life in a national park

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F; Uysal, M. S.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 17/08/2017)
      This paper contributes to the advancement of quality-of-life research in tourism by examining complex relationships involving direct, mediated, moderated and moderated mediation relationships among the antecedents to quality-of-life. Using a sample of 222 repeat visitors in an Australian national park, the findings indicate positive significant effects of (1) place satisfaction on quality-of-life; (2) place satisfaction on place attachment; (3) place attachment on quality-of-life; (4) park citizenship on place attachment. The findings further support that (5) place attachment mediates the relationship between place satisfaction and quality-of-life; (6) social involvement moderates the relationship between place satisfaction and place attachment; (7) park citizenship moderates the relationship between place satisfaction and place attachment; (8) social involvement moderates the relationship between place attachment and quality-of-life; (9) social involvement moderates the indirect effect of place satisfaction on quality-of-life. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Park managers, for example, need to promote on-site marketing and post-visit communication/interpretation, encouraging repeat visits and behavioural change. Message delivery needs to promote a sense of belonging to the park with personal meaning, creating place distinctiveness. Personal actions to promote include signing petitions supporting the park's biodiversity, and other resources, and volunteering to participate in meetings and other direct actions.
    • Spa services and wellness activities within the surf tourism experience; the case study of Jersey, Channel Islands.

      Iliuta, Maria-Alexandra; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby; University of Derby, Derby, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-03-23)
      This paper explores the feasibility of developing spa and wellness activities within the surf tourism experience in Jersey (Channel Islands) from the surf traveller’s perspective. Using this worldview, we evaluate a surf tourism offer in Jersey. Through an analysis of the lifestyle and attitudes of today’s surf traveller, we offer preliminary suggestions to marketers and surf lodge owners to capitalise on this unique target market. The conceptual position, that we term Swellness, refers to the perceived wellness dimensions and benefits of surfing. We identify that spa and wellness elements are feasible add-ons for surf product development. The study has also revealed an openness towards other wellness-related concepts, such as Surf Set Fitness or man­made wave surfing parks. Furthermore, the research has shown that wellness and personal responsibility for well-being are part of a surf subculture.
    • Spa tourism

      Azara, Iride; Stockdale, Isobel; University of Derby (Routledge, 2012-01-01)
    • Sport tourists’ preferred event attributes and motives: a case of Sepak Takraw, Malaysia

      Zarei, Azadeh; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Artic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Sage, 2020-04-29)
      This study investigates differences in motives, event attributes, and information sources, which influenced sport tourists’ decision and attendance at the Sepak Takraw event in Malaysia. Data were collected from 224 domestic sports tourists and 92 foreign sports tourists. Findings show that domestic and foreign sports tourists significantly differed in their motives and preferred event attributes. Domestic sports tourists indicate using mass communication items in their decision making to attend the event. Social networking was the most important information source for foreign sports tourists. Practical implications for local sports tourism marketers within small-scale sports events in Malaysia are discussed.
    • The stakeholder sandwich - a new stakeholder analysis model for events and festivals

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Wallace, Kevin; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019-03-21)
      The significance of stakeholders in the festival and events sector is demonstrated in the literature and is a growing area of interest. The application of conventional stakeholder theory to this sector has proved to be problematic and new models developed as alternatives. Since the 1980s a number of matrices and models have been established to identify and categorise stakeholders, but limitations have been exposed in the context of festival and events research. This study set out to explore the use of established stakeholder models for their usefulness and effectiveness in the sector, consider alternative models and to empirically examine a proposed alternative. To do so, a multi-phased qualitative methodology was used. Results indicated that none of the conventional or proposed sector specific models were in common usage by sector professionals but did confirm that Ed Freeman’s founding stakeholder definition of 1984 continues to be valid and hold true. The framework for a new conceptual test model was developed and then refined to produce the Stakeholder Sandwich Model for testing on a live event. This model proved to be effective in identifying and mapping a wide range of stakeholders with flexibility and fluidity, overcoming the limitations of both established conventional models and more recent sector-specific typographies. This model has significant potential for application in the festival and events sector, with implications for both researchers and event practitioners.
    • Steps forward: the journey of wellness education in the UK

      Buxton, Louise; Spring, Charles; University of Derby (2018-06-19)
    • Supporting student transition to higher education through the application of a model of wellness

      Buxton, Louise; Kruzikaite, Roberta; University of Derby (2018-05-27)
    • Supporting student transition to higher education through the application of a model of wellness

      Buxton, Louise; Baker, Lorraine; Rosamond, Victoria; Ebdon, Yvonne; University of Derby (2018-07-02)
    • Sustainable tourism as a catalyst for positive environmental change: the case of LUX* resorts and hotels

      Sowamber, Vishnee; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Monash University; Curtin University; University of Johannesburg (Routledge, 2019-04-29)
      The massive positive impacts through tourism on a country’s economy and environment are often understated and neglected. Despite the possible benefits, tourism development has been heavily criticized for its negative impacts on destinations. However, compared with other sectors, tourism has the ability to reach millions of diverse audiences from different countries annually for positive change. It has the capacity to create harmony in diversity. It brings everyone together on a common mission for a better future with a mindset of oneness and solidarity. The potential for positive environmental change is exponential. The needs and wants for travel and tourism continue to grow, and it would be intelligent to use this sector as a tool for positive change through multi-stakeholder dialogues and involvement. This chapter aims at exploring how a tourism operator has implemented a robust environmental initiative to align with the Paris Agreement and local environmental policies. The researchers use a case study approach of a major hotel group in Mauritius, LUX* Resorts & Hotels, comprising 10 hotels within the destinations Mauritius, Réunion Island, Maldives Island, China and Turkey. The chapter examines how the hotel group has implemented “Tread Lightly by LUX*” for environmental protection in its hotels and resorts. Opportunities and challenges in achieving successful implementation of the Tread Lightly by LUX* initiative are discussed. This chapter offers insights to practitioners and academics on how to view tourism as a tool for positive environmental change, with scope for future research.
    • Technology Platforms and Challenges

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Buhalis, Dimitrios; University of Derby (Channel View Publications, 2010-12)
    • Thanatourism: Case studies in travel to the dark side

      Mandelartz, Pascal; Johnston, Tony; University of Derby (Goodfellows, 2015-10)
      Thanatourism, or dark tourism, is an increasingly pervasive feature of the contemporary tourism landscape. Travel to have actual or symbolic ‘encounters with death’ is not a new phenomenon and is now one of the fastest growing areas for debate and research in the study of Tourism. Thanatourism is an important new overview of the growing field. It introduces more rigorous scholarship, new philosophical perspectives and a wealth of empirical material on the contemporary and historical consumption of death with case studies designed to stretch and challenge current discourse. Contexts presented in the book will include- well known religious sites battlefield locations genocide camps lesser known exhibition centres and a plague site. It takes a broad methodological approach and discusses both research and teaching approaches in thanatourism as well as acknowledging its emotive nature. It is an essential new resource for all those who research or teach in the area as well as for upper level students.
    • The relationship between environmental worldviews, emotions and personal efficacy in climate change

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G.; Monash University (IJAS, 2014)
      This study investigates the effects of a video on the Australian viewers’ environmental worldviews, their emotions and personal efficacy in climate change. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were employed to test the associations between the constructs. The main theoretical contribution relates to the mediating role of emotions in climate change communication. Results further show that the video increased viewers’ perception that they can influence climate change outcomes, as well as encourage others to reduce the effects of climate change. Findings suggest that effective climate change communication has to target people’s emotions. Policy should be directed to climate change communication tools with a focus on emotional engagement to encourage people to take personal responsibility in climate change and act, catalysing the desired behavioural change.
    • The satisfaction-place attachment relationship: Potential mediators and moderators.

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T; Monash University (Elsevier, 23/05/2015)
      Researchers use place satisfaction as a dependent variable extensively since place has implications for a range of performance measures. This study reverses the relationships suggesting place satisfaction as a useful antecedent to place attachment. Place satisfaction, measured as visitors' summative evaluation of their experience is likely to be more positively associated with place dependence, identity, affect, and social bonding. The findings of this study support this contention and establish that one of the principal mechanisms linking place satisfaction to place attachment is pro-environmental behavioral intention (PEB). The study further finds that gender moderates the relationship between PEB and place attachment. The conditional indirect effect of place satisfaction on place attachment is significant only for male visitors. The article closes with implications of the study for academics and practitioners.
    • Thermal and mineral springs

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
      Water and spa are ubiquitous geographically and culturally, but the relationship between that water and bathing rituals has led directly and indirectly to the organic growth of many of today’s spa products. The aim of this chapter is to explore the use of thermal and mineral waters for bathing, and it begins with a review of the origins, cultural and religious associations of bathing rituals. The current industry suggests that the approaches to hot spring bathing are broadly defined by three main categories: Relaxation and connection with the environment, as seen in Asian cultures; Health based and spiritual treatments, largely seen in European cultures; Religious connections, evident in Indian and indigenous cultures. This categorisation creates a debate within the industry as to whether globalisation fosters a blurring of these distinctions. Questions that result from this are: Is connection to the environment evident in cultures other than Asia? Where else are spiritual treatments seen other than in Europe? Do religious connections exist outside of indigenous cultures? The chapter also provides a historical illustration, drawing on examples of thermal and mineral spas from different continents, from the ancient Greek and Roman baths, the glamorous European spa resorts, to the onsen of Japan and hot springs of North America. The context is exampled in size and shape where Davidson (cited in Global Spa and Wellness Summit, 2013) and the Global Wellness Institute (GWI) (2014) concur in estimating that the global market is now worth over fifty billion US dollars. Furthermore, this market. growth is driven by new manifestations, such as the rejuvenation of the Eastern European industry based around emerging tourism destinations. For example the Hungarian resort of Heviz, developments such as the Crescent Hotel in Buxton, England and in North and Sub-Saharan Africa. The efficacy of bathing in thermal and mineral waters is then discussed as is the relationship to the notion of ‘existential authenticity’.