• Derby Cathedral as a beacon: the role of the Church of England in tourism management.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (2015)
      In this research the role of the Cathedral is as a beacon inspiring and guiding community development. Good practice case studies in community collaboration, like the Cathedral's, are perceived as central and critical to the success of regeneration and development. The philosophical approach used engages the paradigms of community development (Moscardo, 2014; Ness, 2014; Goodson and Phillimore, 2012; Gilchrist and Taylor, 2011). A bottom-up, endogenous approach to development is perceived to deliver unique selling points to the community. An exogenous and centralist approach is perceived to deliver standardised outcomes that may not encourage actors to develop distinctive and special features for future strategies. This report measured the strength of the Cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of Derby, in delivering community outcomes that reflect both the values, beliefs and aims of the Church of England and of the city. At the same time it identifies the structures required within the Cathedral to support these aims and objectives. A participatory action approach, rooted in social constructivism, is used to frame the investigation into delivery and operation (Mayo et al., 2013). With the active encouragement of participants at the Cathedral and within other specific organisations located in the City the future requirements of strategy and operations to deliver exceptional outcomes that encompass the good practices are explored. This approach incorporates analysis of community's beliefs, expectations and values. The model then creates a framework for supporting, advocating and co-creating a development agenda that has the Cathedral at its core. The model reflects on the achievements of the Cathedral, the structure needed to make those achievements, it sells the strategy for people to operate it, and it tells the stories of that strategy to reflect the output and outcomes and concludes with indicators for future development by the Cathedral. The paper concludes reflecting the increased social capital that is created in this approach.
    • Destination marketing and visitor experiences: the development of a conceptual framework

      Jiang, Y; Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 13/11/2015)
      When confronted with increasingly experienced, demanding, and sophisticated visitors, destination marketers may find it problematic to succeed in destination marketing. This article attempts to address this challenge through the exploration of the relationship between destination image and two critical indicators of successful destination marketing: visitor delight and place attachment. It integratesdisparate themes in destination marketing and recognizes the relationshipsbetween marketing stimuli, customer experiences, and marketing outcomes. A comprehensive and coherent theoretical model is established to explain the complexities involved in the formation of important destination marketing outcomes. This article critically examines fun and customer orientation as two key concepts of visitor experiences and proposes them as principal mechanisms that mediate the relationship between destination image and visitor responses (visitor delight and place attachment). The article’s theoretical contributions, limitations, and practical implications for tourism authorities and destination marketers are discussed
    • Destination spas and the creation of memorable guest experiences

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2018-07-30)
    • Distributed leadership in DMOs: a review of literature and directions for future research

      Hristov, Dean; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Naumov, Nick; University of Northampton; University of Derby; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa; Nexford University, Washington DC, USA (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-27)
      Amidst key emergent challenges for Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) and destinations triggered by changes in the funding and governance landscape for tourism on a global scale, Distributed Leadership (DL) has emerged as a promising concept to provide a collaborative framework for channelling resources and leadership to cope with such changes. Current evidence from academic literature discussing the importance of embedding shared forms of leadership is scarce and few studies discuss the application of DL in the context of DMOs. The key purpose of the following conceptual study is to provide a critical overview of key DL contributions in the mainstream and DMO academic literature. The study seeks to examine the relevance of DL in the context DMOs with the purpose to stimulate future empirical investigations in the application of DL in DMO organisations.
    • Edible insects and their acceptance in western societies

      Jauniskis, Pijus; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2020-11-27)
      This paper examines current literature on edible insect consumption in western culture through an inductive lens, addressing environmental, nutritional, food security, anthropological and psychological aspects of the topic. Findings show that western aversion towards edible insects is deeply psychological and cultural, mostly ignoring the pleasure dimensions such as taste, texture and flavour. The nature of the problem appears to be predominantly social. Results suggest that a beneficial route of introducing edible insects into the western diet could be formed through a societal perspective. Tourism and hospitality can potentially play a big part in the edible insect development. For instance, food as a tourism product can attract visitors from different backgrounds whilst food consumption as a tourism experience subliminally promises an experience of novelty and potential newfound pleasure in food. Food as an integral part of various cultures and local heritages entails local dishes that can be considered ‘cultural artifacts’ and their consumption symbolises the consumption of ‘other’. Tourism experiences can expose an individual to lasting personal change, self-discovery and intellectual development. Hence, taking into consideration that acquiring new cultural knowledge increases openness to experience, it is possible that tourism could contribute to adopting the practice of insect consumption in the western cultural sphere.
    • Employing a value-belief-norm framework to gauge Carthage residents’ intentions to support sustainable cultural heritage tourism

      Megeihi, Huda El; Woosnam, Kyle Maurice; Ribeiro, Manuel Alector; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Denley, Tara Joyce; University of derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-03-16)
      In light of the recent conflicts in Carthage over land use, Cultural heritage preservation, and sustainable tourism, this work utilized a value-belief-norm (VBN) theoretical framework to consider psychological antecedents of residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. As such, personal values, cultural worldview, awareness of consequences, ascription of responsibility, and subjective norms were considered antecedents of intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. Data were collected from 475 Carthage residents in nine neighborhoods adjacent to UNESCO World Heritage Sites using an on-site self-administered questionnaire. The proposed model was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (to demonstrate sound psychometric properties across all 11 factors within the model), followed by structural equation modelling. Overall, 15 of the 19 proposed hypotheses were supported, ultimately contributing to 28% of the variance explained in residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. This work not only provides support for the utilization of the VBN model within the context of cultural heritage tourism, it also deepens our understanding of the theoretical framework through the inclusion of the multi-dimensional construct cultural worldview.
    • Environmentally and financially sustainable tourism

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; Monash University; Curtin University ((ICHRIE Research Reports) Richmond VA USA: International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional EducationICHRIE, 2018-12-20)
    • Evaluating the effectiveness of wipe for wildlife and its campaign elements

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G.; Monash University (01/2014)
    • An evaluation of practitioners’ views of consultancy and applied research at the University of Derby

      Edwards, Mike; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (2013)
      The aim of this research has two objectives; firstly, to evaluate the development of cognitive, transferable and intellectual skills in Higher Education students, secondly, to transfer that knowledge by means of collaboration with community organisations. Experiential learning and regeneration/diversification project work is needed by all communities. The collaboration is built upon our ability to provide graduates and a community with portfolios of independent evidence of achievement obtained from working with a partner organisation. The work-related learning supports the Community Charitable Trust “New Opportunities Wirksworth” in the market town of Wirksworth, Derbyshire through the delivery of specially negotiated work-based learning. Teaching, learning and assessment in Higher Education use problem-based learning, especially in vocation-specific domains that is usually undertaken using a constructivist approach. Such constructivist methodologies are often predicated, for students and for teachers, on the delivery of experiential, entrepreneurial and applied skills. Students are seen as short-changed if they are not engaging with Problem Based Learning from lecturers working at the ‘frontiers of knowledge’. We also acknowledge that Problem Based Learning provides an opportunity for producing outcomes in new knowledge for students and communities that is highly usable when compared to memory-based learning . So, in this research we directed and managed a cadre of students to consider PBL as experiential and practical learning. The project meets the contemporary employability agenda through the application of PBL and knowledge transfer to our specific organisation, ‘Wirksworth NOW!’. The outcomes and outputs of the collaboration have applications in NOW’s core cluster components for community regeneration: arts, creative industries and culture, trade and tourism, education and training, youth. Keywords Problem-based
    • Event portfolio management: theory and methods for event management and tourism

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ziakas, Vassilios; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; Plymouth Marjon University; University of Calgary (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
      Event Portfolio Management' explores the phenomenon of the event portfolio as a policy tool for cities and destinations. Divided into two parts – ‘Theory’ and ‘Practice’ – the book critically analyses and summarises key underpinnings behind portfolio theory development and identifies key trends and issues in the event portfolio approach. It examines the processes of event portfolio development and management, leveraging, stakeholder networking and collaboration, portfolio design, risk assessment and evaluation. With a wide geographical reach, the book introduces the results of empirical research from different international case studies, including Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin in New Zealand, Canberra and Melbourne in Australia, and Manchester and Edinburgh in the UK.
    • An eventful tourism city: Hosting major international exhibitions in Melbourne

      Gorchakova, Valentina; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-01-01)
    • Events and place experience: Improvisation with city rhythms and psychogeography.

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (2017-09-14)
      Events have been increasingly used in place-making, where a lived space of a city is linked to a conceived and imaginative space through new meanings, symbols, identity, narrative and storytelling. Place-making requires the development and delivery of a unique and authentic experience. A place experience reflects people’s interaction with the physical, virtual and social environment of cities. Place experiencing stimulates imagery processing, 38 gives meaning and generates emotions. A symbiosis of events, cityscapes, images, and attached meanings generates an attractive aura of eventfulness which transforms city daily rhythms. Although different aspects of place experience through events have been discussed in the literature, the research on the multifaceted dimensions of such experience remains limited. The proposed research project aims at filling this gap by exploring the nature of lived experiences of an event place. Specifically, the study will investigate how a host city is being experienced during the course of city-scale events by different target groups, including local residents, event attendees and city visitors. A mixed method phenomenological approach is chosen as an appropriate research design. The research will combine phenomenology with quantitative surveys to cross-validate findings. The preliminary quantitative findings will review effects of events on a lived place experience and will be used to inform the phenomenological part where the nature of place experience will be explored in depth. Buxton, a spa town in Derbyshire, UK, is chosen as a location for data collection. The town is famous for its historic architecture, beautiful countryside and several large-scale cultural and music festivals. A mixed method phenomenological perspective of this research can provide richer insights into the nature of one’s own experience of a host city, as well as synthesise personal experiences with collective meanings about the place. The results of the research will have several contributions. Theoretically, the research will contribute to the place-making theory in tourism and events by providing a deeper understanding of place and event experience dimensions. Methodologically, the research will demonstrate the potential and appropriateness of phenomenology in event studies. Practically, the results of the research may be useful in planning of city event and tourism projects in order to design and deliver unique and authentic place experiences and synergise multiple meanings co-created by different actors.
    • Events in a changing world - Introductory remarks

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Azara, Iride; Pappas, Nikolaos; University of Derby; University of Sunderland (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019-03-21)
    • Exploring the relationship between food and spirituality: A literature review

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Jauniškis, Pijus; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-03-14)
      Spirituality is emerging as a novel research area throughout different subjects but being a highly subjective and controversial topic, it very often fails to deliver academically (McSherry and Cash, 2004). Spirituality, in the same way as food, is not merely about theories or concepts but is deeply embedded in the practical elements of life (Salonen, 2018). From that perspective, the conjoint area of research between food and spirituality is auspicious fertile land for new knowledge both for academics and practitioners. The general aim of this review is to synthesize current available literature on spiritual aspects of food consumption in attempt to find reoccurring themes and ultimately establish a useful definition for future research.
    • The fundamentals of event design

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ramsbottom, Olivia; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-12-20)
      The Fundamentals of Event Design aims to rethink current approaches to event design and production. The textbook explores the relationship between event design and multiple visitor experiences, as well as interactivity, motivation, sensory stimuli, and co-creative participation. structured around the key phases of event design, the book covers all the critical dimensions of event concepting, atmospherics, the application of interactive technologies, project management, team leadership, creative marketing and sustainable production. The concepts of authenticity, creativity, co-creation, Imagineering and storytelling are discussed throughout, and practical step-by-step guidance is provided on how to create and deliver unique and memorable events. The chapters include industry voices offering real life insight from leading international event practitioners and individual and/or team assignments to stimulate learners’ creativity, visualisation and problem solving.
    • Game park tourism.

      Azara, Iride; Wilcockson, Helen; University of Derby; West Notts College (Sage, 2017-07-03)
      The term game park tourism is used to define a range of tourism experiences specifically occurring within the designated boundaries of a game park. These experiences range from nonconsumptive activities, such as wildlife photography, observational activities, arts, and painting, to consumptive practices, such as hunting in game parks, fishing, petting lions, riding elephants, and so on.
    • Generating and sustaining value through guided tour experiences’ co-creation at heritage visitor attractions

      Azara, Iride; Bezova, Kamila; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis Group, 2021-02-11)
      Experience co-creation has been acknowledged as an important process to generate and sustain value. However, research in the arena of heritage visitor attractions remains limited. A qualitative cross-sectional design was used to assess UK heritage attractions providers’ engagement with guided tour experiences’ cocreation and the barriers faced in the adoption of this process. Findings from 11 interviews with visitor experience managers show most of the heritage attraction providers engage in processes of guided tour experience “co-production” rather than “co-creation”. Barriers include limited knowledge, and “knowhow” of value co-creation processes; financial, time, and human resource constraints. Importantly, findings show visitors’ satisfaction with current arrangements influence the type of tour offering. This study reveals the need to further investigate heritage audiences’ variations in preferences and suggests better sector integration in terms of knowledge sharing and best practice to fully explore the benefits and worth of value cocreation in this tourism sector.
    • Guest introduction: Making sense of event experiences.

      Ramsbottom, Olivia; Michopoulou, Eleni; Azara, Iride; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2018-02-01)