• Health, wellness and place attachment during and post health pandemics

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Majeed, Salman; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Derby, Derby Business School; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China (Frontiers, 2020-11-26)
      Therapeutic landscapes encapsulate healing and recovery notions in natural and built environmental settings. Tourists’ perceptions determine their decision making of health and wellness tourism consumption. Researchers struggle with the conceptualization of the term ‘therapeutic landscapes’ across disciplines. Drawing on extant literature searched in nine databases, this scoping review identifies different dimensions of therapeutic landscapes. Out of identified 178 literature sources, 124 met the inclusion criteria of identified keywords. We review the contribution and the potential of environmental psychology in understanding tourist behavior to promote health and wellness tourism destinations in a post COVID-19 context. We develop and propose conceptual framework comprising: (1) perceived goodness of therapeutic landscapes, (2) health and wellness consumption, (3) COVID-19 pandemic perceived health and wellness risk, (4) place attachment (5) re-visitation. We propose measurement scales, discuss implications and major issues in the immediate and post the COVID-19 pandemic to inform future research.
    • Local community attitudes and perceptions towards thermalism.

      Fleur, Stevens; Azara, Iride; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-02-28)
      Thermalism is enjoying a global resurgence of interest as consumers seek out ethical, natural, and place-based wellness experiences. In Europe, the ‘success rate of healing through thermalism has maintained the high reputation of thermal springs with curative powers’. However, thermalism has been culturally lost in the UK. This study focuses on a UK historical spa site currently undergoing restoration. Once restored, this will be one of three UK's only spa hotels with direct access to natural thermal mineral waters. An ethnographic case study design was used to explore community's perceptions and attitudes towards thermalism and the wellness tourism development model being implemented on location. Findings suggest that memories of the values and virtues of thermalism persist within the community and that, if harnessed, can play a significant role in supporting the local and national wellness agenda. However, findings also suggest that the reintroduction of thermal tourism in the location is perceived by the community as a luxury commodity reserved exclusively for the wealthy and elite members of society. Thermalism is a social and cultural resource and thus attention should be paid to ensure that any wellness tourism development model follows a cultural participatory logic and not solely an economic one.
    • A non- conference review: a note on conferences that never were, those that may be and those that will be in 2021

      Azara, Iride; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-02)
      A non-traditional conference review offering a synthetic update on the latest academic and industry conference developments in the areas of wellness and wellbeing as well as some thoughts on what future conferences may look like in the near and long term future.
    • Spa services and wellness activities within the surf tourism experience; the case study of Jersey, Channel Islands.

      Iliuta, Maria-Alexandra; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby; University of Derby, Derby, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-03-23)
      This paper explores the feasibility of developing spa and wellness activities within the surf tourism experience in Jersey (Channel Islands) from the surf traveller’s perspective. Using this worldview, we evaluate a surf tourism offer in Jersey. Through an analysis of the lifestyle and attitudes of today’s surf traveller, we offer preliminary suggestions to marketers and surf lodge owners to capitalise on this unique target market. The conceptual position, that we term Swellness, refers to the perceived wellness dimensions and benefits of surfing. We identify that spa and wellness elements are feasible add-ons for surf product development. The study has also revealed an openness towards other wellness-related concepts, such as Surf Set Fitness or man­made wave surfing parks. Furthermore, the research has shown that wellness and personal responsibility for well-being are part of a surf subculture.
    • Spa tourism

      Azara, Iride; Stockdale, Isobel; University of Derby (Routledge, 2012-01-01)