• Major events programming in a city: Comparing three approaches to portfolio design.

      Antchak, Vladimir; Pernecky, Tomas; University of Derby; Auckland University of Technology (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2017-11-08)
      Event portfolio design is increasingly important from both academic and industry perspectives. The purpose of this article is to discuss and conceptualize the strategic process of event portfolio planning and development in different urban contexts in New Zealand. A qualitative multiple case study was conducted in three cities: Auckland, Wellington, and Dunedin. Primary data were collected by interviewing city event planners from city councils and relevant council controlled organizations. Secondary data were obtained by the analysis of the relevant documents, including city event policies and strategies, annual reports, statements, and activity plans. Thematic analysis revealed the existence of distinctive portfolio approaches in the studied cases, which can be compared and differentiated by applying the following parameters: Formality, Intentionality, Directionality, and Rhythmicity. Together, these parameters represent a "built-in equalizer" that can be used to balance the opposing values of diverse approaches and adjust them within current city objectives. The article provides a rich and broad context, which enables an understanding of the strategic nature of event portfolios and their implementation within a wider city development agenda.
    • Migrant workers’ rights, social justice and sustainability in Australian and New Zealand wineries: a comparative context

      Baird, Tim; Hall, C. Michael; Castka, Pavel; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ; Curtin University, Perth, Australia (Palgrave Macmillan/ Springer Nature, 2019-11-23)
      This chapter focuses on sustainable practices from the perspective of current social sustainability issues involving the rights of migrant workers within the New Zealand wine industry. A comparative context from the Australian wine industry is also provided using the cool climate winegrowing areas of Western Australia and Tasmania. Migrant workers’ rights and social justice were two areas which featured in the 2015 and 2016 National Wineries Survey that was conducted across all three of these regions and was designed to examine wine producers’ perceptions towards sustainability and wine tourism. This study found that in terms of the social aspects of sustainability and the treatment of migrant workers that very different opinions existed between Australian and New Zealand wineries. Wineries in both Tasmania and Western Australia saw social sustainability as impacting on their business practices, while their New Zealand counterparts were seemingly somewhat ambivalent towards this issue.
    • Tourism, indigenous peoples and endogeneity in the Chatham Islands.

      Wiltshier, Peter; Cardow, Andrew; University of Derby; Massey University (Emerald, 2008)
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. Design/methodology/approach – The twenty‐first century identifies good practices in many aspects of bottom‐up planning and implementation in neoliberal political economies. New Zealand is for many reasons, due to scale, skills and education, an example of endogenous development that is used globally for best practice studies. This paper specifically identifies and explores the local responses to the challenge of democracy and opportunities for diversification through tourism services provision on the Chatham Islands. Findings – The paper notes that community capacity and governance on the Chathams has been the subject of discussion in recent years and the focus has been directed to conflicts in governance and possibly inappropriate policy and practice coordination. Although the refocus on endogenous development, empowerment and devolution of responsibility has a long pedigree in the context of the neoliberal economy, insufficient attention has been paid to the skills, inclination, social and economic capital for indigenous enterprise, more so in an environment of isolation, relative deprivation and dependence. Originality/value – This paper highlights indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. A useful model of indigenous tourism development and its endogenous antecedents is considered at the conclusion.