• Anthropology of gastronomies

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (2013-03-27)
      “Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are” Savarin (1825) These defining words spoken in a time of dynamic changes within gastronomy arguably shaped the ideological consumption of food. This book chapter aims to discuss how the anthropology of gastronomies as a concept has always been of significance. It is only recently that the subject has risen from the fringe of academic inquiry to a more prominent position within the discipline, moving away from the simple listing of the constitutive aspects of the diet. (Herrmann and Gruneberg, 1993; Shimp, 1994; Sternberg and Grigorenko, 1997; Straughan and Roberts, 1999; Wagner, 2003; Wells, 1993). Furthermore, the chapter will show how food anthropology is embedded within cultures and has differing ideologies and meanings. Levi-Strauss, (1966) suggested that cognitive ability and consumption is based upon the tribal knowledge and examination on cultural habits such as behaviour and the way people think, classification patterns and their knowledge is a reflection of their collective experiences. The chapter aims to discuss the current and potential further implications of anthropology of gastronomies using 3 key themes/questions: • Can gastronomies be simply classified under an anthropological umbrella? • Is there a picture of our concern or apathy when it involves food? • If they can be proved can we truly determine anthropologies of gastronomies on a planet which now expresses personal representation and national identity with the food policy and the food it consumes? Food anthropology is not strictly limited to investigating one particular food ritual and its interaction with culture. Many studies have focused on fast foods and fast food restaurants and issues of globalization, trans-nationalism and offering of a contrived product described as authentic. Representations of gastronomies are also identified in the hermeneutics of its text (Tressider, 2011), (interpreted in several ways based on an individual’s ethnocentrism and experiences)
    • The stakeholder sandwich - a new stakeholder analysis model for events and festivals

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Wallace, Kevin; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019-03-21)
      The significance of stakeholders in the festival and events sector is demonstrated in the literature and is a growing area of interest. The application of conventional stakeholder theory to this sector has proved to be problematic and new models developed as alternatives. Since the 1980s a number of matrices and models have been established to identify and categorise stakeholders, but limitations have been exposed in the context of festival and events research. This study set out to explore the use of established stakeholder models for their usefulness and effectiveness in the sector, consider alternative models and to empirically examine a proposed alternative. To do so, a multi-phased qualitative methodology was used. Results indicated that none of the conventional or proposed sector specific models were in common usage by sector professionals but did confirm that Ed Freeman’s founding stakeholder definition of 1984 continues to be valid and hold true. The framework for a new conceptual test model was developed and then refined to produce the Stakeholder Sandwich Model for testing on a live event. This model proved to be effective in identifying and mapping a wide range of stakeholders with flexibility and fluidity, overcoming the limitations of both established conventional models and more recent sector-specific typographies. This model has significant potential for application in the festival and events sector, with implications for both researchers and event practitioners.