• The complexity of decision-making processes and IoT adoption in accommodation SMEs

      Pappas, Nikolaos; Caputo, Andrea; Pellegrini, Massimiliano Matteo; Marzi, Giacomo; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Sunderland; University of Trento, Italy; University of Lincoln; University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Italy; University of Lincoln; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-01-18)
      The current competitive scenario is fast-moving toward an integration of sophisticated technological innovations, i.e. smart solutions for hospitality, in particular the accommodation industry. Internet of Things (IoT) technologies are able to connect and let communicate different devices to craft a personalized customer experience. Given the undeniable impact for the hospitality sector, the decisions about adopting smart solutions are not always linear: benefits and limitations co-exist and need to be weighed against each other. By adopting fsQCA, this paper compares several decision-making factors that may influence the willingness to adopt IoT, surveying owners/managers in the Greek accommodation industry. Results show four types of decision-making: (i) rational, a weighted evaluation of risks and opportunities; (ii) enthusiast, mostly highlighting benefits to gain a competitive advantage; (iii) cautious, emphasizing risks and barriers to innovate; and (iv) futurist, a consideration of future technological necessities related to the increasing digitalization.
    • Game park tourism.

      Azara, Iride; Wilcockson, Helen; University of Derby; West Notts College (Sage, 2017-07-03)
      The term game park tourism is used to define a range of tourism experiences specifically occurring within the designated boundaries of a game park. These experiences range from nonconsumptive activities, such as wildlife photography, observational activities, arts, and painting, to consumptive practices, such as hunting in game parks, fishing, petting lions, riding elephants, and so on.
    • Hospitality consumers’ decision-making

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      With growing insights and the call for more sustainable practices to contribute to the protection of the environment, consumers of tourism and hospitality are becoming more ecologically conscious, demanding more sustainable products. This chapter provides a review of the behavioral models most relevant to choice of hospitality products and services. It contributes to the existing repertoire of knowledge through an exploration of information processing, personal efficacy, innovation and image as important factors influencing hospitality consumers’ decision-making, and presents a range of theoretical and practical implications. It is expected to assist hospitality providers to understand consumers’ decision-making when choosing sustainable hospitality products and services. This will allow practitioners to make informed decisions regarding the provision of sustainable and innovative hospitality products and services sought by the target audience.
    • Impact of sustainability practices on hospitality consumers’ behaviors and attitudes: The case of LUX* resorts & hotels

      Sowamber, Vishnee; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Movondo, Felix; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      The growing volume of research on customers’ attitudes towards sustainability practices in the hospitality sector has attracted significant interest from researchers and managers in the past decade. This chapter investigates the relationship between sustainability practices in hotels and its influence on consumers’ attitudes and behaviors, and the brand. Using LUX* Resorts & Hotels as a case study, this chapter provides insights into the growing importance of sustainability practices among resorts and hotels. It shows how consumers play an important role in shifting a business strategy towards a more sustainable course. This chapter will be of value to practitioners in helping them align their strategies with customers’ expectations. It contributes to the pool of studies on sustainability in hotels and resorts, which will assist researchers in furthering research and reflection in this area.
    • Social customer relationship management: A customer perspective

      Dewnarain, Senika; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; University of Derby; Curtin Mauritius, Charles Telfair Campus, Mauritius; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Taylor & Francis, 2021-04-13)
      The availability of many social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online review sites such as Trip Advisor has led to the emergence of a new concept known as social customer relationship management (SCRM) or CRM 2.0. This is defined as a business strategy of engaging customers through social media with the goal of building trust and brand loyalty (Greenberg, 2010; Li et al., 2020; Rita & Moro, 2018), SCRM provides traditional customer relationship management for online customers by shifting the focus from a transactional outlook to one that centers on customer experiences (Dewnarain et al., 2019a; Sigala, 2018; Touni et al., 10 2020; Zhang et al., 2019).
    • Understanding key motivations for using a hotel gamified application.

      Parapanos, Demos; Michopoulou, Elina; University of Derby (Springer., 2018-12-15)
      While hospitality has been one of the industries that have been keen to adopt and use various technologies, the proliferation of gamification application is still to materialise. It is therefore very interesting to investigate the potential benefits of gamified applications for both demand and supply in the area of the hospitality industry by identifying the motives of individuals’ when they use a hotel-gamified application. Since fun has become the requirement to ensure continuous demands for many products or services, companies and organizations feel the need to involve fun in their offerings to secure continuity in consumption and use. Hence, this study aims to understand the meaning of fun for individuals when they will use a hotel-gamified application. Visual material was prepared so the interviewees would have an idea of how a hotel-gamified application would look if it were in existence today based on the current definitions of gamification.