• Co-creating value in desert tourism experiences

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Al-Qasmi, Idrees; Melpignano, Claudia; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-01-21)
      This study investigates the determinants of value co-creation in desert camps in Oman from both the customers' and the camp managers' perspectives. The concept of value co-creation in hospitality and tourism has been investigated in a range of ways in the extant literature. However, limited attention has been paid in the process of value co-creation in remote and unique destinations such as desert camps. This research focuses on 5 aspects of value co-creation which are then explored both quantitatively and qualitatively. The findings of the study indicate that within the context of desert camps, value co-creation is influenced by authenticity, engagement, place attachment, and marketing though the value-in-use concept. However, the level of this influence varies between the customers and the camp managers. Finally, findings are discussed in the light of this variance to identify and provide recommendations that enhance value co-creation in the desert camps of Oman.
    • Management Practices for the Development of Religious Tourism Sacred Sites: Managing expectations through sacred and secular aims in site development; report, store and access

      Wiltshier, Peter; Griffiths, Maureen; University of Derby (Dublin Institute of Technology, 2016)
      Through a distillation of practices reflective of the extant literature and socio-economic approaches to inclusive development of sites of religious experiences and worship, we posit that there are seven core conceptual approaches to support evolving site management needs. Therefore, developing sites of special significance necessarily requires the dissemination and sharing of both intellectual and practical contributions to meet those needs in a planned and stakeholder-driven approach. Traditional approaches to development emerged half a century ago with a focus on core competencies and the agreed understanding that open and fair competition would raise quality and assure reasonable profit margins. Creating awareness of services and products and mapping those to our marketing practices are the first two tools in the toolkit. Analysis and synthesis through primary research enables cleric and manager to grasp visitors’ and worshippers’ needs and develop audiences for sites. Fourthly we present the importance of maintenance and plans for developing sites to accommodate factors in both internal and external environments that acknowledge the requirement to remain competitive. Next, the importance of networks, grappling with the wider community and perhaps establishing a wider, even global, reach, is appraised as important. In seeking to tap into resources traditionally not employed in managing religious and pilgrimage sites we elevate the need for an enterprise culture (this enterprise culture is seen in the other papers in this special issue). The final offer includes dimensions of volunteering, nontraditional support networks, altruism and philanthropy which we name as ‘the third way'.
    • Revisiting Value Co-creation and Co-destruction in Tourism

      Cavagnaro, Elena; Michopoulou, Eleni; Pappas, Nikolaos; NHL Stenden University of Applied Sciences; University of Derby; University of Sunderland (Informa UK Limited, 2021-03-05)
      As COVID-19 has shown in a way unimaginable before it hit, tourism is susceptible to uncertainty and incidents that can directly impact the supply and demand of its discretionary products and services. Before the pandemic, consensus had been reached among practitioners and academics that consumer experience is more important than ever for enterprises as well as destinations, as the sector had become globalized, reached maturity and became highly competitive. Tourism came to a grinding halt due to the pandemic and recovery may take years. Still, the pathway to success (or failure) lies on the overall satisfaction of visitors and tourists, which heavily depends on perceived value; a concept that can be co-created or co-destroyed by the very interaction between all social actors and stakeholders involved. Value creation or destruction is critical not just for traditional supply of and demand for, but also for an array of actors across value and distribution chains (including for example staff and intermediaries across the networks). The special issue’s aim was to assist the better understanding of value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism development by bringing together different perspectives and disciplines. Judging from the diversity of the theoretical perspectives of the articles collected in this issue and the richness of the presented findings the special issue has indeed achieved its aim. Yet some real trends could be distinguished: the relevance of online communication and information; the importance of interpersonal encounters and social interaction for value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism; and the challenges in the design and delivery process of co-created experiences.
    • Tourism, indigenous peoples and endogeneity in the Chatham Islands.

      Wiltshier, Peter; Cardow, Andrew; University of Derby; Massey University (Emerald, 2008)
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. Design/methodology/approach – The twenty‐first century identifies good practices in many aspects of bottom‐up planning and implementation in neoliberal political economies. New Zealand is for many reasons, due to scale, skills and education, an example of endogenous development that is used globally for best practice studies. This paper specifically identifies and explores the local responses to the challenge of democracy and opportunities for diversification through tourism services provision on the Chatham Islands. Findings – The paper notes that community capacity and governance on the Chathams has been the subject of discussion in recent years and the focus has been directed to conflicts in governance and possibly inappropriate policy and practice coordination. Although the refocus on endogenous development, empowerment and devolution of responsibility has a long pedigree in the context of the neoliberal economy, insufficient attention has been paid to the skills, inclination, social and economic capital for indigenous enterprise, more so in an environment of isolation, relative deprivation and dependence. Originality/value – This paper highlights indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. A useful model of indigenous tourism development and its endogenous antecedents is considered at the conclusion.
    • Value co-creation and co-destruction: considerations of spa servicescapes

      Buxton, Louise; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-01-19)
      Spas are places that enable mind, body and spiritual harmony, and are therefore inextricably linked to the pursuit of health and wellbeing, as one of the most prominent forms of wellness tourism. Recent growth in the global spa industry is fuelled by increasing consumer interest in the pursuit of wellness. Concepts within the spa industry remain largely unexplored, thus, this conceptual paper aims to progress our understanding by considering opportunities for value co-creation and co-destruction in a spa context. In doing this, the paper unpacks the concept of the servicescape, explores the concept of authenticity and argues that understanding the consumption and production of experiences is central to understanding the creation of value in spa service settings.