• Can flow state enhance learning on culinary arts programmes?

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2012-05-09)
      The research conducted investigates who is marketing what, to whom, and why. Finally conclusions/theories will be suggested as to the future of a ‘new’ form of culinary artistry as a form of academic rigour and relevance in terms of sustainability and growth of a 20 credit framework. “Repression is not the way to virtue. When people restrain themselves out of fear, their lives are by necessity diminished. Only through freely chosen discipline can life be enjoyed and still kept within the bounds of reason."[ Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1998)
    • Psychological consumption of culinary artistry in the Peak District

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2011-05-11)
      This paper is based upon the culture of culinary artistry, consumption and design. The ranges of sources are specific to The Peak District using Chatsworth House as a case study. It will attempt to conceptualise the heritage, sustainability and perception of culinary arts as a medium of culture. Elements of cultural heritage tourism will be incorporated into this paper and conceptualised to culinary arts. “Culture is a fascinating concept. Our favourite analogy is to compare it to a beautiful jewel – hold it to the light, and reveal its multiple dimensions. Culture is not just a tool for coping, but a means for creating awareness and for learning”. Harris and Moran (2001) Data collected through in-depth interviews, a questionnaire survey and observation will be presented and analysed which seeks to address the practical aspects to the theoretical models. The qualitative analysis of data suggests that there are parameters that have an important yet underlying resonance in the consumption of the product; cognition, perception and psychology. The fundamental feature of common sense psychology is the underlying belief system that underlies peoples overt behaviour are causes and that it is these causal patterns and NOT the way in which an activity is performed that represents the ‘real’ meaning of what people do. Initial research highlighted attribution theory as the underlying elements or associated discourses and is supported by Lewis (2006) who highlights Hofstedes definition of culture as the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes one member from the other. A more simplified definition highlighted by Baron and Byrne (2000) defines culture as an organized system of shared meanings, perception and beliefs held by persons belonging to any group. This ‘cultural sensitivity’ is enhanced by utilising its resources to understand the perception and behaviours influenced by the cultural values (organized system or collective programming) of the host and guest (Wood and Botherton 2008).