• Derby Cathedral as a beacon: the role of the Church of England in tourism management.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (2015)
      In this research the role of the Cathedral is as a beacon inspiring and guiding community development. Good practice case studies in community collaboration, like the Cathedral's, are perceived as central and critical to the success of regeneration and development. The philosophical approach used engages the paradigms of community development (Moscardo, 2014; Ness, 2014; Goodson and Phillimore, 2012; Gilchrist and Taylor, 2011). A bottom-up, endogenous approach to development is perceived to deliver unique selling points to the community. An exogenous and centralist approach is perceived to deliver standardised outcomes that may not encourage actors to develop distinctive and special features for future strategies. This report measured the strength of the Cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of Derby, in delivering community outcomes that reflect both the values, beliefs and aims of the Church of England and of the city. At the same time it identifies the structures required within the Cathedral to support these aims and objectives. A participatory action approach, rooted in social constructivism, is used to frame the investigation into delivery and operation (Mayo et al., 2013). With the active encouragement of participants at the Cathedral and within other specific organisations located in the City the future requirements of strategy and operations to deliver exceptional outcomes that encompass the good practices are explored. This approach incorporates analysis of community's beliefs, expectations and values. The model then creates a framework for supporting, advocating and co-creating a development agenda that has the Cathedral at its core. The model reflects on the achievements of the Cathedral, the structure needed to make those achievements, it sells the strategy for people to operate it, and it tells the stories of that strategy to reflect the output and outcomes and concludes with indicators for future development by the Cathedral. The paper concludes reflecting the increased social capital that is created in this approach.
    • Legacies from nurturers in tourism; Inspiring people for communities.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (The University of Aveiro, 2017)
      In this paper a review of pre-requisites for supply side competency in developing community based tourism is offered. Using an interpretive and phenomenological approach, the skills, aptitudes and capacity to nurture within the community, are considered in a focus on improving a destination’s ability to sustain tourism as an element of development. This development agenda is dependent on marshalling an array of skills in a complex, differentiated and individualised marketplace. It is difficult to achieve triple-bottom line sustainability without acknowledging key skills in nurturing planning, policy interpretation, building of networks and partnerships, building relationships with other hosts in the community, understanding and interpreting triple-bottom line sustainability, mentoring others, understanding lifestyle choices, innovating whilst at all times enjoying and living a chosen life (Tinsley and Lynch, 2001). Nine UK based informants prioritise the antecedents of successful tourism development from a community based approach. This paper seeks to identify and illuminate practices amongst stakeholders termed ‘nurturers’ that develop tourism and destinations through excitement of image and identity, engagement of many and often diverse groups of people, capturing values and beliefs that are often inimitable and working with supportive public sector stakeholders.