• How Influencing Behaviours Can Accelerate the Transition to a Water Sensitive City.

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G; Kneebone, S. C; Monash University (CRC for Water Sensitive Cities, 31/01/2015)
      his Behaviour Assessment Database has been compiled as part of the CRC Water for Sensitive Cities project on 'Accelerating to Water Sensitive Cities by Influencing Behaviour' (Project A2.2). The overarching goal of this research project is to develop and test interventions that seek to change desirable behaviours, primarily in residents, to assist a movement toward water sensitive cities.
    • Visitors' experience, place attachment and sustainable behaviour at cultural heritage sites: a conceptual framework

      Buonincontri, P; Marasco, A; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (MDPI, 26/06/2017)
      Sustainable tourism research has attracted wide interest from scholars and practitioners. While several heritage sites are mandated to provide optimum visitor satisfaction with increasing competition in the market, managers of heritage sites face growing challenges in striking a balance between consumption and conservation. This calls for promoting more sustainable behaviours among consumers of heritage. This study proposes a conceptualization of sustainable behaviour for heritage consumers. Using the attitude–behaviour relationship underpinned by the Theory of Reasoned Action, it develops and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates visitors’ heritage experiences, their attachment to heritage sites, and their general and site-specific sustainable heritage behaviour and presents their interrelationships as proposed hypotheses. Theoretical contributions and practical implications for heritage site managers are discussed.
    • Samadhi spa & wellness retreat

      Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Kendall/Hunt Publishing, 23/08/2013)
    • The satisfaction-place attachment relationship: Potential mediators and moderators.

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T; Monash University (Elsevier, 23/05/2015)
      Researchers use place satisfaction as a dependent variable extensively since place has implications for a range of performance measures. This study reverses the relationships suggesting place satisfaction as a useful antecedent to place attachment. Place satisfaction, measured as visitors' summative evaluation of their experience is likely to be more positively associated with place dependence, identity, affect, and social bonding. The findings of this study support this contention and establish that one of the principal mechanisms linking place satisfaction to place attachment is pro-environmental behavioral intention (PEB). The study further finds that gender moderates the relationship between PEB and place attachment. The conditional indirect effect of place satisfaction on place attachment is significant only for male visitors. The article closes with implications of the study for academics and practitioners.
    • Proenvironmental behavior: critical link between satisfaction and place attachment in Australia and Canada

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T.; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 23/03/2017)
      This study explores issues of scale equivalence and generalizability in national parks. Visitors' place satisfaction, proenvironmental behavior, and place attachment are measured across two qualitatively distinct populations in Australia and Canada. Techniques employed in this cross-country study bring an important contribution to tourism research. The primary focus is to establish measure equivalence before undertaking hypothesis testing using structural equation modeling on a sample of 339 repeat visitors at the Dandenong Ranges National Park, Australia, and 296 repeat visitors at the Bruce Peninsula National Park, Canada. Results from both samples indicate (a) there is measure equivalence between the Australian and Canadian samples allowing comparability of findings, (b) a positive and significant effect of visitor place satisfaction on proenvironmental behavioral intentions, (c) a significant and positive influence of proenvironmental behavioral intention on place attachment (place identity, place dependence, place social bonding, place affect), and (d) a significant and negative effect of visitor place satisfaction on place social bonding. The main finding relates to the promotion of proenvironmental behaviors among national park users that—in addition to individual benefits—provides environmental sustainability as well as practical benefits for park managers and society.
    • Role of ethnic cultural events to build an authentic destination image

      Shabnam, S; Choudhury, A; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 21/12/2018)
      Local festivals are becoming increasingly important tourist attractions for the sophisticated tourist in quest of new authentic experiences (Ramkissoon and Uysal, 2014; Ramkissoon, 2015, 2016). The extent to which local festivals can grow as a point of attraction for international tourists while ful?lling their social and cultural roles at the national level is an issue of immense importance to social and cultural policymakers and destination marketers. This chapter explores the local festival of ‘Pohela Boishakh’, which is the celebration of the Bengali New Year. It is recognised by UNESCO as ‘Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity’ and identified as the largest national event of Bangladesh, a developing economy with crucial geo-political importance in the South Asian region, with substantial economic promises for the local population (UNESCO, 2016). This chapter draws on Getz et al. (2006)’s framework to explore festival stakeholder relationships, especially resource dependency issues, with a view to advancing the application of stakeholder theory to festival tourism, festival management and marketing in an integrated manner. Implications for tourism and event management along with theoretical advances are discussed with suggestions for future research in the field.
    • Leadership in destination management organisations.

      Hristov, D; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Elsevier, 21/09/2016)
    • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • Potentials of tourism products and services in Bangladesh

      Hassan, Azizul; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-08-30)
      Exploring the potential for tourism development in Bangladesh, an emerging economy has important implications. It is important to have a clear and detailed knowledge of the tourism offerings in the country. However, there is a lack of available literature that analyses the potentials of tourism in Bangladesh. Thus, the aim of this research is to outline the tourism potentials of Bangladesh through the understanding of its tourism resources. This research is based on reviewing the available literature and online resources. Findings show that the potentials of tourism product and service offers in Bangladesh is subject to identification and priority analysis. An effective policy planning and implementation framework becomes relevant in this regard. This research reflects that the potentials of tourism development in Bangladesh can be capitalised with support of an effective set of policy implementation. The potentials of tourism products and services availability and supplies mostly rely on many different factors. Bangladesh as a tourist destination is required to redefine its products and services when the country will experience a sharp growth of domestic tourists mostly benefitting from the disposable income and the availability of leisure time.
    • Beauty and elegance: value co-creation in cosmetic surgery tourism

      Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (SAGE Publications, 2020-06-16)
      This study presents an emerging trend in medical tourism, cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore tourists’ perceptions of CST for medical service quality as an antecedent to tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit, which is underexplored in CST. This study examines the mediating role of value co-creation in influencing behaviors of CST-seeking tourists to experience a better quality of life. Using a sample drawn from 279 tourists, comprised of Australian, Japanese, and Chinese nationalities at two international airports in China, findings show that perceived medical service quality positively influences tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit directly and through the mediating role of value co-creation across the three nationalities. CST-seeking tourists’ inputs in value co-creation may positively influence their behaviors, which are vital antecedents to promoting CST business. Implications for future research are discussed.
    • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

      Buxton, Louise; Batchelor, Lauren; Loynes, Tony; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-05-29)
      The World Health Organisation (WHO) [(2018). The top ten causes of death. http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top10-causes-of-death] highlights that 12.2 million people die globally from non-communicable diseases while still in work. The effect of poor work and lifestyle habits on health is directing some of the responsibility for changing behaviours to employers, through the development of workplace wellness programmes [Baker (2017). Obesity statistics. House of Commons Library]. However, literature reveals an important challenge with workplace wellness programmes, namely, the measurement of their success to identify return on investment (ROI). Furthermore, the vast number of employers are reluctant to implement anything that costs money without knowing that it will be successful [Mattke et al. 2013. Workplace wellness programs study (1st ed.). Rand Corporation]. A challenge is therefore presented, in identifying appropriate measures of success for workplace wellness programmes, which can be presented in order to validate investment in them. This paper emphasises the need to develop a measurement tool which employs both quantitative and qualitative measures, to demonstrate the success in both financial and human terms, furthermore it asserts that a measurement tool could provide data which is required to secure investment from employers in workplace wellness programmes (Mattke et al. 2013) and facilitate benchmarking of similar organisation in terms of workplace wellness outcomes [Emkjer (2013). Focus On… Employee Health, Moving the Needle on Employee Wellness: The Human Factor. Employee Benefits Plan Review Dec 2013].
    • Modelling and simulations for tourism and hospitality. An introduction

      Azara, Iride; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-05-05)
    • Sport tourists’ preferred event attributes and motives: a case of Sepak Takraw, Malaysia

      Zarei, Azadeh; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Artic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Sage, 2020-04-29)
      This study investigates differences in motives, event attributes, and information sources, which influenced sport tourists’ decision and attendance at the Sepak Takraw event in Malaysia. Data were collected from 224 domestic sports tourists and 92 foreign sports tourists. Findings show that domestic and foreign sports tourists significantly differed in their motives and preferred event attributes. Domestic sports tourists indicate using mass communication items in their decision making to attend the event. Social networking was the most important information source for foreign sports tourists. Practical implications for local sports tourism marketers within small-scale sports events in Malaysia are discussed.
    • Online tourism information and tourist behavior: a structural equation modeling analysis based on a self-administered survey

      Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Lu, Changbao; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, China; University of Derby; Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa (Frontiers in Psychology, 2020-04-21)
      This study presents the interacting phenomena of perceptions of tourist destination online content (TDOC) and tourists’ behavioral intentions with a mediating role of tourists’ satisfaction, which is as yet under-explored in hospitality and tourism research. A model based on three main constructs, namely TDOC (with sub-constructs of online information quality and user-friendly accessibility), satisfaction, and tourists’ behavioral intentions [with sub-constructs of intentions to visit a tourist destination and electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM)], is presented to determine the growth of tourism business with the internet. Data were collected via a questionnaire-based survey from 413 tourists staying at hotels in Lahore city in Pakistan. Partial least square structural equation modeling was used to statistically analyze the gathered data. The findings indicate that tourists’ perceptions of TDOC directly influence their behavioral intentions, while tourists’ satisfaction exerts a mediating influence between tourists’ perceptions of TDOC and their behavioral intentions. Taking advantage of an economical and widespread online environment, destination marketing organizations could attract more tourists by fostering confidence in TDOC and positive eWOM to remain competitive in the long run. Important theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
    • Investigating the triangular relationship between Temporary event workforce, event employment businesses and event organisers

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Azara, Iride; Russell, Anna; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing, 2020-04-13)
      This study examines issues of talent management in events. Specifically, it investigates the triangular relationship that exists amongst temporary event workforces, event employment businesses and event organisers. A mixed method design was used including 1) a quantitative survey of UK Temporary Event Workers (TEW) to examine their characteristics and motivations to work at events; 2) a qualitative survey with Event organisers (EOs) to understand the reasons for using Temporary Event Workers and Event Employment Businesses and 3) interviews with Event Employment Businesses (EEBs) to understand their challenges in delivering best-fit between Temporary Event Workers and Event organisers. This study sheds light on the complex relationships amongst temporary event workforces, event organisers and event employment businesses. Findings show TEW who display high levels of affective commitment towards their employment organisation, and possess the characteristics of extraversion and contentiousness, are highly motivated to work at events. Event organisers suggest their operational restrictions (such as limited resources, time and expertise) are fuelling the need to use Event Employment Businesses to source staff with the right skills and attitudes. In turn, these recruiters demonstrate they play an active role in reconciling the often-conflicting needs of Event Organisers and Temporary Event Workers. This study extends knowledge and understanding on Talent Management (TM) in events by providing insights into the characteristics of TEW as a growing labour market segment in the event sector. Significantly, the study contributes to a better understanding of the critical role that Event Employment Businesses play in the
    • Employing a value-belief-norm framework to gauge Carthage residents’ intentions to support sustainable cultural heritage tourism

      Megeihi, Huda El; Woosnam, Kyle Maurice; Ribeiro, Manuel Alector; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Denley, Tara Joyce; University of derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-03-16)
      In light of the recent conflicts in Carthage over land use, Cultural heritage preservation, and sustainable tourism, this work utilized a value-belief-norm (VBN) theoretical framework to consider psychological antecedents of residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. As such, personal values, cultural worldview, awareness of consequences, ascription of responsibility, and subjective norms were considered antecedents of intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. Data were collected from 475 Carthage residents in nine neighborhoods adjacent to UNESCO World Heritage Sites using an on-site self-administered questionnaire. The proposed model was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (to demonstrate sound psychometric properties across all 11 factors within the model), followed by structural equation modelling. Overall, 15 of the 19 proposed hypotheses were supported, ultimately contributing to 28% of the variance explained in residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. This work not only provides support for the utilization of the VBN model within the context of cultural heritage tourism, it also deepens our understanding of the theoretical framework through the inclusion of the multi-dimensional construct cultural worldview.
    • Exploring the relationship between food and spirituality: A literature review

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Jauniškis, Pijus; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-03-14)
      Spirituality is emerging as a novel research area throughout different subjects but being a highly subjective and controversial topic, it very often fails to deliver academically (McSherry and Cash, 2004). Spirituality, in the same way as food, is not merely about theories or concepts but is deeply embedded in the practical elements of life (Salonen, 2018). From that perspective, the conjoint area of research between food and spirituality is auspicious fertile land for new knowledge both for academics and practitioners. The general aim of this review is to synthesize current available literature on spiritual aspects of food consumption in attempt to find reoccurring themes and ultimately establish a useful definition for future research.
    • Health and welfare at the boundaries: community development through tourism

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (Emerald, 2019-12-30)
      Concepts of health and wellbeing have long been conceived as relevant to leisure, recreation and rejuvenation. These are now conceived as being necessary and useful as potential measures of success in community development and in that subset of leisure and recreation pursuits that is designated as tourism at a destination. The paper aims to discuss this issue. A post-modern approach to development of community and markers of sustainable development more-or-less correspond to sustainable development goals (there are 17) that often overlay the concepts of good health and wellbeing that concern all stakeholders. This paper encompasses best practice experiences from two case studies conducted in a tourism “hot spot” in the environs of the first National Park established in Derbyshire in the UK. There is some urgency about this topic as resources for community development are increasingly under pressure from local, central government and the expectation is now that local communities take full responsibility for that development. An inter-disciplinary approach using concepts of health and wellbeing is recommended. Wellbeing may demand a greater allocation of scarce resources in an era of self-determination, bottom-up and locally sourced community aspiring to become, or remain, a destination of choice. Two case studies’ outcomes in this development are presented with a special focus on creation of a repository for the know-how and know what of the learning acquired.