• Beauty and elegance: value co-creation in cosmetic surgery tourism

      Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (SAGE Publications, 2020-06-16)
      This study presents an emerging trend in medical tourism, cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore tourists’ perceptions of CST for medical service quality as an antecedent to tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit, which is underexplored in CST. This study examines the mediating role of value co-creation in influencing behaviors of CST-seeking tourists to experience a better quality of life. Using a sample drawn from 279 tourists, comprised of Australian, Japanese, and Chinese nationalities at two international airports in China, findings show that perceived medical service quality positively influences tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit directly and through the mediating role of value co-creation across the three nationalities. CST-seeking tourists’ inputs in value co-creation may positively influence their behaviors, which are vital antecedents to promoting CST business. Implications for future research are discussed.
    • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • Thermal and mineral springs

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
      Water and spa are ubiquitous geographically and culturally, but the relationship between that water and bathing rituals has led directly and indirectly to the organic growth of many of today’s spa products. The aim of this chapter is to explore the use of thermal and mineral waters for bathing, and it begins with a review of the origins, cultural and religious associations of bathing rituals. The current industry suggests that the approaches to hot spring bathing are broadly defined by three main categories: Relaxation and connection with the environment, as seen in Asian cultures; Health based and spiritual treatments, largely seen in European cultures; Religious connections, evident in Indian and indigenous cultures. This categorisation creates a debate within the industry as to whether globalisation fosters a blurring of these distinctions. Questions that result from this are: Is connection to the environment evident in cultures other than Asia? Where else are spiritual treatments seen other than in Europe? Do religious connections exist outside of indigenous cultures? The chapter also provides a historical illustration, drawing on examples of thermal and mineral spas from different continents, from the ancient Greek and Roman baths, the glamorous European spa resorts, to the onsen of Japan and hot springs of North America. The context is exampled in size and shape where Davidson (cited in Global Spa and Wellness Summit, 2013) and the Global Wellness Institute (GWI) (2014) concur in estimating that the global market is now worth over fifty billion US dollars. Furthermore, this market. growth is driven by new manifestations, such as the rejuvenation of the Eastern European industry based around emerging tourism destinations. For example the Hungarian resort of Heviz, developments such as the Crescent Hotel in Buxton, England and in North and Sub-Saharan Africa. The efficacy of bathing in thermal and mineral waters is then discussed as is the relationship to the notion of ‘existential authenticity’.
    • Selling the total spa product

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
      Retail sales can contribute significantly to a spa’s revenue, however, many spas do not realise their full retail potential. This chapter presents strategies to maximise retail sales, including: brand selection, brand ambassadors, incentives, training, retail design and visual merchandising to provide a tool kit for success. Consideration is also given to the importance of integrating retail throughout the entire customer journey. A case study is presented at the end of the chapter to encourage the application of knowledge. Selling experiences is seen as the principal function of a spa (Wuttle and Cohen, 2008), nevertheless, retail and other sales such as up-selling and link selling can all make significant contributions to a spa’s revenue. In exploring approaches to selling, the benefits of, and barriers to, selling are presented as well as strategies to maximise sales. The chapter is therefore essentially a more practically based one, but needs to be read in conjunction with the chapters on consumer behaviour, guest service and journey and marketing spas.
    • Supporting student transition to higher education through the application of a model of wellness

      Buxton, Louise; Baker, Lorraine; Rosamond, Victoria; Ebdon, Yvonne; University of Derby (2018-07-02)
    • Plastics and the spa industry

      Buxton, Louise; Stockdale, Isobel; University of Derby (2019-05-08)
    • What can a graduate do for you?

      Buxton, Louise; Baker, Lorraine; University of Derby (2018-05-21)
    • Supporting student transition to higher education through the application of a model of wellness

      Buxton, Louise; Kruzikaite, Roberta; University of Derby (2018-05-27)
    • Steps forward: the journey of wellness education in the UK

      Buxton, Louise; Spring, Charles; University of Derby (2018-06-19)
    • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

      Buxton, Louise; Loynes, Tony; Batchelor, Lauren; University of Derby (2018-06-28)
    • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

      Buxton, Louise; Batchelor, Lauren; Loynes, Tony; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-05-29)
      The World Health Organisation (WHO) [(2018). The top ten causes of death. http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top10-causes-of-death] highlights that 12.2 million people die globally from non-communicable diseases while still in work. The effect of poor work and lifestyle habits on health is directing some of the responsibility for changing behaviours to employers, through the development of workplace wellness programmes [Baker (2017). Obesity statistics. House of Commons Library]. However, literature reveals an important challenge with workplace wellness programmes, namely, the measurement of their success to identify return on investment (ROI). Furthermore, the vast number of employers are reluctant to implement anything that costs money without knowing that it will be successful [Mattke et al. 2013. Workplace wellness programs study (1st ed.). Rand Corporation]. A challenge is therefore presented, in identifying appropriate measures of success for workplace wellness programmes, which can be presented in order to validate investment in them. This paper emphasises the need to develop a measurement tool which employs both quantitative and qualitative measures, to demonstrate the success in both financial and human terms, furthermore it asserts that a measurement tool could provide data which is required to secure investment from employers in workplace wellness programmes (Mattke et al. 2013) and facilitate benchmarking of similar organisation in terms of workplace wellness outcomes [Emkjer (2013). Focus On… Employee Health, Moving the Needle on Employee Wellness: The Human Factor. Employee Benefits Plan Review Dec 2013].
    • Destination spas and the creation of memorable guest experiences

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2018-07-30)
    • Modelling and simulations for tourism and hospitality. An introduction

      Azara, Iride; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-05-05)
    • Potentials of tourism products and services in Bangladesh

      Hassan, Azizul; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-08-30)
      Exploring the potential for tourism development in Bangladesh, an emerging economy has important implications. It is important to have a clear and detailed knowledge of the tourism offerings in the country. However, there is a lack of available literature that analyses the potentials of tourism in Bangladesh. Thus, the aim of this research is to outline the tourism potentials of Bangladesh through the understanding of its tourism resources. This research is based on reviewing the available literature and online resources. Findings show that the potentials of tourism product and service offers in Bangladesh is subject to identification and priority analysis. An effective policy planning and implementation framework becomes relevant in this regard. This research reflects that the potentials of tourism development in Bangladesh can be capitalised with support of an effective set of policy implementation. The potentials of tourism products and services availability and supplies mostly rely on many different factors. Bangladesh as a tourist destination is required to redefine its products and services when the country will experience a sharp growth of domestic tourists mostly benefitting from the disposable income and the availability of leisure time.
    • Sport tourists’ preferred event attributes and motives: a case of Sepak Takraw, Malaysia

      Zarei, Azadeh; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Artic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Sage, 2020-04-29)
      This study investigates differences in motives, event attributes, and information sources, which influenced sport tourists’ decision and attendance at the Sepak Takraw event in Malaysia. Data were collected from 224 domestic sports tourists and 92 foreign sports tourists. Findings show that domestic and foreign sports tourists significantly differed in their motives and preferred event attributes. Domestic sports tourists indicate using mass communication items in their decision making to attend the event. Social networking was the most important information source for foreign sports tourists. Practical implications for local sports tourism marketers within small-scale sports events in Malaysia are discussed.
    • Online tourism information and tourist behavior: a structural equation modeling analysis based on a self-administered survey

      Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Lu, Changbao; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, China; University of Derby; Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa (Frontiers in Psychology, 2020-04-21)
      This study presents the interacting phenomena of perceptions of tourist destination online content (TDOC) and tourists’ behavioral intentions with a mediating role of tourists’ satisfaction, which is as yet under-explored in hospitality and tourism research. A model based on three main constructs, namely TDOC (with sub-constructs of online information quality and user-friendly accessibility), satisfaction, and tourists’ behavioral intentions [with sub-constructs of intentions to visit a tourist destination and electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM)], is presented to determine the growth of tourism business with the internet. Data were collected via a questionnaire-based survey from 413 tourists staying at hotels in Lahore city in Pakistan. Partial least square structural equation modeling was used to statistically analyze the gathered data. The findings indicate that tourists’ perceptions of TDOC directly influence their behavioral intentions, while tourists’ satisfaction exerts a mediating influence between tourists’ perceptions of TDOC and their behavioral intentions. Taking advantage of an economical and widespread online environment, destination marketing organizations could attract more tourists by fostering confidence in TDOC and positive eWOM to remain competitive in the long run. Important theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
    • Investigating the triangular relationship between Temporary event workforce, event employment businesses and event organisers

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Azara, Iride; Russell, Anna; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing, 2020-04-13)
      This study examines issues of talent management in events. Specifically, it investigates the triangular relationship that exists amongst temporary event workforces, event employment businesses and event organisers. A mixed method design was used including 1) a quantitative survey of UK Temporary Event Workers (TEW) to examine their characteristics and motivations to work at events; 2) a qualitative survey with Event organisers (EOs) to understand the reasons for using Temporary Event Workers and Event Employment Businesses and 3) interviews with Event Employment Businesses (EEBs) to understand their challenges in delivering best-fit between Temporary Event Workers and Event organisers. This study sheds light on the complex relationships amongst temporary event workforces, event organisers and event employment businesses. Findings show TEW who display high levels of affective commitment towards their employment organisation, and possess the characteristics of extraversion and contentiousness, are highly motivated to work at events. Event organisers suggest their operational restrictions (such as limited resources, time and expertise) are fuelling the need to use Event Employment Businesses to source staff with the right skills and attitudes. In turn, these recruiters demonstrate they play an active role in reconciling the often-conflicting needs of Event Organisers and Temporary Event Workers. This study extends knowledge and understanding on Talent Management (TM) in events by providing insights into the characteristics of TEW as a growing labour market segment in the event sector. Significantly, the study contributes to a better understanding of the critical role that Event Employment Businesses play in the