• Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • Potentials of tourism products and services in Bangladesh

      Hassan, Azizul; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-08-30)
      Exploring the potential for tourism development in Bangladesh, an emerging economy has important implications. It is important to have a clear and detailed knowledge of the tourism offerings in the country. However, there is a lack of available literature that analyses the potentials of tourism in Bangladesh. Thus, the aim of this research is to outline the tourism potentials of Bangladesh through the understanding of its tourism resources. This research is based on reviewing the available literature and online resources. Findings show that the potentials of tourism product and service offers in Bangladesh is subject to identification and priority analysis. An effective policy planning and implementation framework becomes relevant in this regard. This research reflects that the potentials of tourism development in Bangladesh can be capitalised with support of an effective set of policy implementation. The potentials of tourism products and services availability and supplies mostly rely on many different factors. Bangladesh as a tourist destination is required to redefine its products and services when the country will experience a sharp growth of domestic tourists mostly benefitting from the disposable income and the availability of leisure time.
    • Sport tourists’ preferred event attributes and motives: a case of Sepak Takraw, Malaysia

      Zarei, Azadeh; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Artic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Sage, 2020-04-29)
      This study investigates differences in motives, event attributes, and information sources, which influenced sport tourists’ decision and attendance at the Sepak Takraw event in Malaysia. Data were collected from 224 domestic sports tourists and 92 foreign sports tourists. Findings show that domestic and foreign sports tourists significantly differed in their motives and preferred event attributes. Domestic sports tourists indicate using mass communication items in their decision making to attend the event. Social networking was the most important information source for foreign sports tourists. Practical implications for local sports tourism marketers within small-scale sports events in Malaysia are discussed.