• Corporate social responsibility at LUX* resorts and hotels: Satisfaction and loyalty implications for employee and customer social responsibility

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, Derby Business School; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; University of Coventry (MDPI AG, 2020-11-22)
      Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) remains a hot topic in management. Yet, little is known about how well managers, employees and consumers are responding to CSR initiatives to align with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Underpinned by well-established theories, this study develops a single integrative model of managers’, employees’ and consumers’ CSR. Data were collected from the LUX* group of resorts and hotels located on three Indian Ocean islands: Mauritius, Reunion and the Maldives. Structural equation modelling was employed. Findings reveal: (1) organizational CSR is positively related to employee social responsibility; (2) organizational CSR is negatively associated with customer social responsibility; (3) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer social responsibility; (4) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer delight; (5) customer social responsibility is positively related to customer satisfaction; and (6); customer social responsibility is positively related to customer delight. Strategic CSR initiatives with a multi-stakeholder engagement approach are discussed. Keywords: corporate social responsibility; stakeholder engagement; employee; customer satisfaction; loyalty
    • Environmentally and financially sustainable tourism

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; Monash University; Curtin University ((ICHRIE Research Reports) Richmond VA USA: International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional EducationICHRIE, 2018-12-20)
    • Impact of sustainability practices on hospitality consumers’ behaviors and attitudes: The case of LUX* resorts & hotels

      Sowamber, Vishnee; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Movondo, Felix; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      The growing volume of research on customers’ attitudes towards sustainability practices in the hospitality sector has attracted significant interest from researchers and managers in the past decade. This chapter investigates the relationship between sustainability practices in hotels and its influence on consumers’ attitudes and behaviors, and the brand. Using LUX* Resorts & Hotels as a case study, this chapter provides insights into the growing importance of sustainability practices among resorts and hotels. It shows how consumers play an important role in shifting a business strategy towards a more sustainable course. This chapter will be of value to practitioners in helping them align their strategies with customers’ expectations. It contributes to the pool of studies on sustainability in hotels and resorts, which will assist researchers in furthering research and reflection in this area.
    • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • Sustainable tourism as a catalyst for positive environmental change: the case of LUX* resorts and hotels

      Sowamber, Vishnee; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Monash University; Curtin University; University of Johannesburg (Routledge, 2019-04-29)
      The massive positive impacts through tourism on a country’s economy and environment are often understated and neglected. Despite the possible benefits, tourism development has been heavily criticized for its negative impacts on destinations. However, compared with other sectors, tourism has the ability to reach millions of diverse audiences from different countries annually for positive change. It has the capacity to create harmony in diversity. It brings everyone together on a common mission for a better future with a mindset of oneness and solidarity. The potential for positive environmental change is exponential. The needs and wants for travel and tourism continue to grow, and it would be intelligent to use this sector as a tool for positive change through multi-stakeholder dialogues and involvement. This chapter aims at exploring how a tourism operator has implemented a robust environmental initiative to align with the Paris Agreement and local environmental policies. The researchers use a case study approach of a major hotel group in Mauritius, LUX* Resorts & Hotels, comprising 10 hotels within the destinations Mauritius, Réunion Island, Maldives Island, China and Turkey. The chapter examines how the hotel group has implemented “Tread Lightly by LUX*” for environmental protection in its hotels and resorts. Opportunities and challenges in achieving successful implementation of the Tread Lightly by LUX* initiative are discussed. This chapter offers insights to practitioners and academics on how to view tourism as a tool for positive environmental change, with scope for future research.