• IT and Well-Being in Travel and Tourism

      Moisa, Delia; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Springer, 2022-10-27)
      Accelerating levels of stress and chronic disease have urged travellers to seek products and experiences that promote a holistic healthy living. However, in the context of increasingly integrated online and offline experiences, where technology does not always work in concert with human nature, tourists are facing the challenge of finding about how to best live a connected life. With travel being one of the most stress- inducing experiences we voluntarily subject ourselves to, tourism players are taking advantage of the latest technology to respond to the travellers’ changing needs and values, by designing innovative experiences that promote overall well-being. This chapter provides a review of the existing research on well-being related to the travel and tourism sector, while focusing on the link with technology advancements, especially the dual perspective of unplugging and intense technology use. As in all great technological revolutions, the digital traveller’s life may potentially unveil a dark side. However, the general consensus is that the positives of using technology within the travel and tourism sector will continue to outweigh the negatives. The chapter focuses on highlighting the different types of technology used to support the traveller’s state of well-being, as well as the role and impact of technology in relation to well-being while travelling.
    • The role of culture on online search behaviour: A comparative study between British and Chinese travellers

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Moisa, Delia; University of Derby; Manchester Metropolitan University (Springer International Publishing, 2016-01-23)
      This study explores the role of culture and its impacts on travellers’ online information search behaviour. The study is focused on two culturally diametric countries: United Kingdom and China (Hofstede, Psychology and Culture, 2011) and they have been selected as case studies, representing values from the Western and the Asian cultures. The research adopted a qualitative approach, and data was collected through interviews in order to enhance the understanding on the subject studied. Findings indicate that culture influences considerably the travellers’ behaviour in the online environment, and as a result of this influence, different behavioural patterns between the British and the Chinese travellers emerged. Conclusions discuss the implications for marketers aiming at the British and the Chinese tourists, and they highlight the need to adopt different strategies in designing and promoting their tourism products for these two particular markets