• City rhythms and events.

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2018-01-04)
    • Event portfolio management: theory and methods for event management and tourism

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ziakas, Vassilios; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; Plymouth Marjon University; University of Calgary (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
      Event Portfolio Management' explores the phenomenon of the event portfolio as a policy tool for cities and destinations. Divided into two parts – ‘Theory’ and ‘Practice’ – the book critically analyses and summarises key underpinnings behind portfolio theory development and identifies key trends and issues in the event portfolio approach. It examines the processes of event portfolio development and management, leveraging, stakeholder networking and collaboration, portfolio design, risk assessment and evaluation. With a wide geographical reach, the book introduces the results of empirical research from different international case studies, including Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin in New Zealand, Canberra and Melbourne in Australia, and Manchester and Edinburgh in the UK.
    • An eventful tourism city: Hosting major international exhibitions in Melbourne

      Gorchakova, Valentina; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-01-01)
    • Events and place experience: Improvisation with city rhythms and psychogeography.

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (2017-09-14)
      Events have been increasingly used in place-making, where a lived space of a city is linked to a conceived and imaginative space through new meanings, symbols, identity, narrative and storytelling. Place-making requires the development and delivery of a unique and authentic experience. A place experience reflects people’s interaction with the physical, virtual and social environment of cities. Place experiencing stimulates imagery processing, 38 gives meaning and generates emotions. A symbiosis of events, cityscapes, images, and attached meanings generates an attractive aura of eventfulness which transforms city daily rhythms. Although different aspects of place experience through events have been discussed in the literature, the research on the multifaceted dimensions of such experience remains limited. The proposed research project aims at filling this gap by exploring the nature of lived experiences of an event place. Specifically, the study will investigate how a host city is being experienced during the course of city-scale events by different target groups, including local residents, event attendees and city visitors. A mixed method phenomenological approach is chosen as an appropriate research design. The research will combine phenomenology with quantitative surveys to cross-validate findings. The preliminary quantitative findings will review effects of events on a lived place experience and will be used to inform the phenomenological part where the nature of place experience will be explored in depth. Buxton, a spa town in Derbyshire, UK, is chosen as a location for data collection. The town is famous for its historic architecture, beautiful countryside and several large-scale cultural and music festivals. A mixed method phenomenological perspective of this research can provide richer insights into the nature of one’s own experience of a host city, as well as synthesise personal experiences with collective meanings about the place. The results of the research will have several contributions. Theoretically, the research will contribute to the place-making theory in tourism and events by providing a deeper understanding of place and event experience dimensions. Methodologically, the research will demonstrate the potential and appropriateness of phenomenology in event studies. Practically, the results of the research may be useful in planning of city event and tourism projects in order to design and deliver unique and authentic place experiences and synergise multiple meanings co-created by different actors.
    • The fundamentals of event design

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ramsbottom, Olivia; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-12-20)
      The Fundamentals of Event Design aims to rethink current approaches to event design and production. The textbook explores the relationship between event design and multiple visitor experiences, as well as interactivity, motivation, sensory stimuli, and co-creative participation. structured around the key phases of event design, the book covers all the critical dimensions of event concepting, atmospherics, the application of interactive technologies, project management, team leadership, creative marketing and sustainable production. The concepts of authenticity, creativity, co-creation, Imagineering and storytelling are discussed throughout, and practical step-by-step guidance is provided on how to create and deliver unique and memorable events. The chapters include industry voices offering real life insight from leading international event practitioners and individual and/or team assignments to stimulate learners’ creativity, visualisation and problem solving.
    • Major events programming in a city: Comparing three approaches to portfolio design.

      Antchak, Vladimir; Pernecky, Tomas; University of Derby; Auckland University of Technology (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2017-11-08)
      Event portfolio design is increasingly important from both academic and industry perspectives. The purpose of this article is to discuss and conceptualize the strategic process of event portfolio planning and development in different urban contexts in New Zealand. A qualitative multiple case study was conducted in three cities: Auckland, Wellington, and Dunedin. Primary data were collected by interviewing city event planners from city councils and relevant council controlled organizations. Secondary data were obtained by the analysis of the relevant documents, including city event policies and strategies, annual reports, statements, and activity plans. Thematic analysis revealed the existence of distinctive portfolio approaches in the studied cases, which can be compared and differentiated by applying the following parameters: Formality, Intentionality, Directionality, and Rhythmicity. Together, these parameters represent a "built-in equalizer" that can be used to balance the opposing values of diverse approaches and adjust them within current city objectives. The article provides a rich and broad context, which enables an understanding of the strategic nature of event portfolios and their implementation within a wider city development agenda.
    • Marginalisation and events

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-03-26)
    • Portfolio of major events in Auckland: characteristics, perspectives and issues

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-04-11)
      Although event portfolios have become an integrated part of destination development, a lack of empirical research into the nature of portfolio design exists. A case study was conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, to explore the nature of the applied portfolio strategy in the city. The findings indicate that Auckland employs an outcomes-driven approach which is characterised by the orientation on economic outcomes, an ‘agnostic’ attitude to the compositional structure of the portfolio, an intensive bidding campaign and leveraging strategies. The current city’s reputation awards, successful event bids and positive economic indicators justify this approach. The identified issues, including a supply-led nature of the event portfolio and its predominantly quantitative measures of success, call for a revalidation of the approach. The results of the study contribute to the ongoing discourse about the value of event portfolios and their sustainable design in different urban destinations.
    • Sector-focused approach to business events in Manchester

      Vokacova, Zuzana; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
    • Small cities with big dreams: creative placemaking and branding strategies

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-12)
    • Unusual venues for business events: Key quality attributes of museums and art galleries

      Antchak, Vladimir; Adams, Eleanor; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-05-15)
      This paper aims to identify the key quality attributes a museum or art gallery should possess and enhance to become an attractive business event venue. The research adopted a two-stage case-study methodology. Firstly, three museums were selected in Manchester, UK, to explore the venues’ approaches to hosting business events. These were the Lowry Art Centre, Salford Museum and Manchester Art Gallery. Secondly, a business event at another museum in the city, Science and Industry Museum, was accessed to explore the audiences’ perceptions and industry requirements regarding the organisation of events in museums. In total, 21 qualitative semi-structured and structured interviews were conducted with the event delegates, event planners and museums’ management. Thematic analysis was applied to identify three key attributes: venue character, memorability and functionality and feasibility. Venue character refers to the overall appeal of a venue, including its history, status and interior design. Memorability refers to the authenticity and uniqueness of the attendee experience at a corporate event organised in a museum. Finally, functionality and feasibility deals with the availability of functional facilities, space flexibility and diverse venue regulations. The findings of the research provide valuable insights to both museums and event companies. The research reveals the main benefits and drawbacks of using a museum or an art gallery as a venue for business events and suggests key aspects to consider while staging a business event in a cultural institution. Museums could apply the findings in marketing to emphasise their uniqueness, authenticity and flexibility.