Recent Submissions

  • Perceived social impacts of tourism and quality-of-life: A new conceptual model

    Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, College of Business, Law, & Social Sciences, Derby Business School; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa (Taylor & Francis, 2020-12-23)
    Residents’ overall well-being and quality-of-life require a deeper understanding of their perceived social impacts of tourism to determine appropriate management strategies to promote behaviours in support of tourism development. Aligning with the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development, this paper proposes a new framework for residents’ quality-of-life. Bringing together multi-disciplinary evidence from environmental, social and cognitive psychology, political science and tourism, this study critically examines how residents’ perceived social impacts of tourism and their interpersonal trust can make them become more place attached and protect their tourism resources. The framework proposes that residents’ perceived social impacts of tourism exerts a direct influence on residents’ interpersonal trust. It further posits that residents’ perceived social impacts of tourism and their interpersonal trust exert a direct influence on residents’ place attachment. The proposed model further considers place attachment to exert a direct influence on residents’ pro-social and pro-environmental behavioural intentions. Pro-social behaviour is proposed to influence pro-environmental behaviour. Further pro-social and pro-environmental behaviors are proposed to influence residents’ support for tourism development. The framework then considers residents’ support for tourism development to exert a direct influence on residents’ overall quality-of-life. The theoretical contributions, practical implications for sustainable community tourism and sustainable tourism in general and the limitations of the study are discussed.
  • Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

    Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
    This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
  • Corporate social responsibility at LUX* resorts and hotels: Satisfaction and loyalty implications for employee and customer social responsibility

    Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, Derby Business School; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; University of Coventry (MDPI AG, 2020-11-22)
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) remains a hot topic in management. Yet, little is known about how well managers, employees and consumers are responding to CSR initiatives to align with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Underpinned by well-established theories, this study develops a single integrative model of managers’, employees’ and consumers’ CSR. Data were collected from the LUX* group of resorts and hotels located on three Indian Ocean islands: Mauritius, Reunion and the Maldives. Structural equation modelling was employed. Findings reveal: (1) organizational CSR is positively related to employee social responsibility; (2) organizational CSR is negatively associated with customer social responsibility; (3) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer social responsibility; (4) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer delight; (5) customer social responsibility is positively related to customer satisfaction; and (6); customer social responsibility is positively related to customer delight. Strategic CSR initiatives with a multi-stakeholder engagement approach are discussed. Keywords: corporate social responsibility; stakeholder engagement; employee; customer satisfaction; loyalty
  • Health, wellness and place attachment during and post health pandemics

    Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Majeed, Salman; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Derby, Derby Business School; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China (Frontiers, 2020-11-26)
    Therapeutic landscapes encapsulate healing and recovery notions in natural and built environmental settings. Tourists’ perceptions determine their decision making of health and wellness tourism consumption. Researchers struggle with the conceptualization of the term ‘therapeutic landscapes’ across disciplines. Drawing on extant literature searched in nine databases, this scoping review identifies different dimensions of therapeutic landscapes. Out of identified 178 literature sources, 124 met the inclusion criteria of identified keywords. We review the contribution and the potential of environmental psychology in understanding tourist behavior to promote health and wellness tourism destinations in a post COVID-19 context. We develop and propose conceptual framework comprising: (1) perceived goodness of therapeutic landscapes, (2) health and wellness consumption, (3) COVID-19 pandemic perceived health and wellness risk, (4) place attachment (5) re-visitation. We propose measurement scales, discuss implications and major issues in the immediate and post the COVID-19 pandemic to inform future research.
  • Augmented reality application for visitor experiences in nature based tourism

    Azizul, Hassan; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (CABI, 2021-03)
    There is evidence that the application of Augmented Reality (AR) supports posi-tive visitor experience. As an innovative technology, AR superimposes computer gen-erated imagery on the real world view and continues to attract the attention of re-searchers and practitioners. It is yet underexplored in the nature tourism context, call-ing for more research in the field. The aim of this chapter is to outline the impacts of AR in nature-based tourism. We use the Sundarbans in Bangladesh as a case to il-lustrate the application of AR in a nature-based setting. Data and information were generated both from the relevant literature and in-depth interviews. The respondents were general visitors, tourism service providers and government officials. Respond-ents were selected by purposive sampling and the interviews were audio-recorded and then self-transcribed. A number of tourism service providers were assertive in capitalising the existing lacks in the Sundarbans in terms of business development. The government officials appeared having concerns about diverse issues but were positive in the application of an innovative technology. This study concludes that the application of AR can possibly generate competitive advantages in a nature-based tourism context. AR is proposed as a tool to assist with sustainability initiatives to pro-tect the Sundarban’s resources and provide optimum visitor satisfaction.
  • Industrialization of nature in the time of complexity unawareness, the case of Chitgar lake, Iran

    Akshik, Arash; Rezapour, Hamed; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Eastern Mediterranean University; Bahcesehir Cyprus University; University of Derby (SAGE, 2020-10-16)
    To find answers to the challenges linked with ecological well-being, policymakers and authorities now prefer the ecosystem-based approach, as the solutions inspired by nature may deflect from ecological collapse. Hereupon, nature-based solutions (NBS) are rhapsodized both in practice and academia, as a means to achieve sustainable development. However, NBS, which inherently is supposed to bring forth positive outcomes, may also lead to unsustainable turmoil. On the other hand, the majority of the studies about NBS are from Western countries and studies focusing on the paradoxical functionality of NBS are scant, especially in the Middle East. In an attempt to bridge this gap, the current study uses one of the largest blue man-made infrastructures in the Middle East as a case. Following the phenomenological interpretive approach, the authors argue that NBS may fabricate unintended problems when the complexity of the supra systems are overlooked. Theoretical and practical contributions are discussed.
  • A non- conference review: a note on conferences that never were, those that may be and those that will be in 2021

    Azara, Iride; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-02)
    A non-traditional conference review offering a synthetic update on the latest academic and industry conference developments in the areas of wellness and wellbeing as well as some thoughts on what future conferences may look like in the near and long term future.
  • Reflecting on perceptions of local communities and visitors: Sustainable heritage leisure and tourism

    Spring, Charles; Wakefield, Lisa; University of Derby (Palgrave McMillan, 2020-06-25)
    The two aspects of Positive Sociology; those of psychology and sociology indicate that communities would prefer that they are engaged and involved in their local leisure activities. Visitors gain satisfaction from experiences they are engaged in. Understanding what these would be is important to destinations. Buxton is undertaking a major regeneration project at the Crescent, a hotel complex with ancillary buildings one of which is the Pump Room. The purpose of research undertaken by students, overseen by academics and members of staff from Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa; was to gain an insight into visitor and community perceptions of Buxton, The Crescent Hotel and The Pump Room. A sustainable use could then be determined for the Pump Room, which has a rich history of visitor use prior to its closure in the 1990’s. Qualitative research was carried out in order to gain a deeper insight into the quality of the community and visitor experience. Quantitative research was used to capture and portray demographics. Data was analysed comparing visitor and community expectations and perceptions of Buxton. Key themes emerging suggest that both visitor and community perceptions and expectations were very similar. The majority of visitors choose Buxton for heritage and culture or the scenery and both groups agreed the most appealing aspects of the Crescent and towns spa heritage, were the history, architecture, outdoor environment and surrounding beauty. Themes regarding future use of the Pump Room gave conflicting opinions. The most common response for both visitors and residents was a tea room/café/restaurant in keeping with the 5* Crescent Hotel. Another theme, which emerged from visitors, was for an entertainment venue. It could be argued that residents and visitors need a better understanding of the Pump Room in order to have a better vision of how it can best be adapted and restored. The authors of this article would suggest that further research is needed with both residents and visitors.
  • An eventful tourism city: Hosting major international exhibitions in Melbourne

    Gorchakova, Valentina; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-01-01)
  • Unusual venues for business events: Key quality attributes of museums and art galleries

    Antchak, Vladimir; Adams, Eleanor; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-05-15)
    This paper aims to identify the key quality attributes a museum or art gallery should possess and enhance to become an attractive business event venue. The research adopted a two-stage case-study methodology. Firstly, three museums were selected in Manchester, UK, to explore the venues’ approaches to hosting business events. These were the Lowry Art Centre, Salford Museum and Manchester Art Gallery. Secondly, a business event at another museum in the city, Science and Industry Museum, was accessed to explore the audiences’ perceptions and industry requirements regarding the organisation of events in museums. In total, 21 qualitative semi-structured and structured interviews were conducted with the event delegates, event planners and museums’ management. Thematic analysis was applied to identify three key attributes: venue character, memorability and functionality and feasibility. Venue character refers to the overall appeal of a venue, including its history, status and interior design. Memorability refers to the authenticity and uniqueness of the attendee experience at a corporate event organised in a museum. Finally, functionality and feasibility deals with the availability of functional facilities, space flexibility and diverse venue regulations. The findings of the research provide valuable insights to both museums and event companies. The research reveals the main benefits and drawbacks of using a museum or an art gallery as a venue for business events and suggests key aspects to consider while staging a business event in a cultural institution. Museums could apply the findings in marketing to emphasise their uniqueness, authenticity and flexibility.
  • COVID-19 place confinement, pro-social, pro-environmental behaviors, and residents’ wellbeing: a new conceptual framework

    Ramkissoon, Haywantee; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Frontiers, 2020-09-01)
    Residents’ wellbeing in the present COVID-19 global health crisis requires a deeper understanding to determine appropriate management strategies to promote sustainable behaviors and contribute to human and planetary health. Residents’ behavior can have a profound influence in contributing to personal and global community’s health by responding effectively to emergency strategies in disease outbreaks such as the Coronavirus. It is evident that an understanding of residents’ behavior(s) pre COVID-19 across fields have relied on over-simplistic models, many of which will need to be revisited. Our interaction with people and nature while respecting social distancing has profound positive impacts on our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing. The current health pandemic has called that people be confined in their homes across many nations as a means to control the spread of the virus and save lives. This calls for research exploring the mechanisms; this paper develops and proposes a conceptual framework suggesting that place confinement promotes pro-social and household pro-environmental behaviors which could become habitual and contribute further to our people’s and our planet’s health. Some evidence shows that human connectedness to place may contribute to engagement in desirable behaviors. Interaction with other members of the household can help create meanings leading to collective actions promoting psychological wellbeing. Promoting hygienic behaviors in the household (frequent hand washing) while at the same time being conscious not to keep the water flowing when not required would contribute to a range of benefits (health, financial, biospheric, altruistic) and promote wellbeing. Engaging in pro-social behaviors may result in positive effects on psychological wellbeing, reducing mental distress giving rise to a sense of attachment and belongingness, trust and overall life satisfaction. Engaging people in low-effort pro-environmental behavior to maintain some levels of physical activity and biological harmony with natural environmental settings (e.g. gardening) may help reduce anxiety and distress. This is the first study exploring the interplay of relationships between place confinement, pro-social behavior, household pro-environmental behaviors, place attachment as a multi-dimensional construct and presenting their relationships to residents’ wellbeing. Behavioral change interventions are proposed to promote lifestyle change for people’s wellbeing and broader societal benefits.
  • Distributed leadership in DMOs: a review of literature and directions for future research

    Hristov, Dean; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Naumov, Nick; University of Northampton; University of Derby; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa; Nexford University, Washington DC, USA (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-27)
    Amidst key emergent challenges for Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) and destinations triggered by changes in the funding and governance landscape for tourism on a global scale, Distributed Leadership (DL) has emerged as a promising concept to provide a collaborative framework for channelling resources and leadership to cope with such changes. Current evidence from academic literature discussing the importance of embedding shared forms of leadership is scarce and few studies discuss the application of DL in the context of DMOs. The key purpose of the following conceptual study is to provide a critical overview of key DL contributions in the mainstream and DMO academic literature. The study seeks to examine the relevance of DL in the context DMOs with the purpose to stimulate future empirical investigations in the application of DL in DMO organisations.
  • Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

    Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
    This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
  • Beauty and elegance: value co-creation in cosmetic surgery tourism

    Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (SAGE Publications, 2020-06-16)
    This study presents an emerging trend in medical tourism, cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore tourists’ perceptions of CST for medical service quality as an antecedent to tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit, which is underexplored in CST. This study examines the mediating role of value co-creation in influencing behaviors of CST-seeking tourists to experience a better quality of life. Using a sample drawn from 279 tourists, comprised of Australian, Japanese, and Chinese nationalities at two international airports in China, findings show that perceived medical service quality positively influences tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit directly and through the mediating role of value co-creation across the three nationalities. CST-seeking tourists’ inputs in value co-creation may positively influence their behaviors, which are vital antecedents to promoting CST business. Implications for future research are discussed.
  • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

    Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
    Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
  • Thermal and mineral springs

    Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
    Water and spa are ubiquitous geographically and culturally, but the relationship between that water and bathing rituals has led directly and indirectly to the organic growth of many of today’s spa products. The aim of this chapter is to explore the use of thermal and mineral waters for bathing, and it begins with a review of the origins, cultural and religious associations of bathing rituals. The current industry suggests that the approaches to hot spring bathing are broadly defined by three main categories: Relaxation and connection with the environment, as seen in Asian cultures; Health based and spiritual treatments, largely seen in European cultures; Religious connections, evident in Indian and indigenous cultures. This categorisation creates a debate within the industry as to whether globalisation fosters a blurring of these distinctions. Questions that result from this are: Is connection to the environment evident in cultures other than Asia? Where else are spiritual treatments seen other than in Europe? Do religious connections exist outside of indigenous cultures? The chapter also provides a historical illustration, drawing on examples of thermal and mineral spas from different continents, from the ancient Greek and Roman baths, the glamorous European spa resorts, to the onsen of Japan and hot springs of North America. The context is exampled in size and shape where Davidson (cited in Global Spa and Wellness Summit, 2013) and the Global Wellness Institute (GWI) (2014) concur in estimating that the global market is now worth over fifty billion US dollars. Furthermore, this market. growth is driven by new manifestations, such as the rejuvenation of the Eastern European industry based around emerging tourism destinations. For example the Hungarian resort of Heviz, developments such as the Crescent Hotel in Buxton, England and in North and Sub-Saharan Africa. The efficacy of bathing in thermal and mineral waters is then discussed as is the relationship to the notion of ‘existential authenticity’.
  • Selling the total spa product

    Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
    Retail sales can contribute significantly to a spa’s revenue, however, many spas do not realise their full retail potential. This chapter presents strategies to maximise retail sales, including: brand selection, brand ambassadors, incentives, training, retail design and visual merchandising to provide a tool kit for success. Consideration is also given to the importance of integrating retail throughout the entire customer journey. A case study is presented at the end of the chapter to encourage the application of knowledge. Selling experiences is seen as the principal function of a spa (Wuttle and Cohen, 2008), nevertheless, retail and other sales such as up-selling and link selling can all make significant contributions to a spa’s revenue. In exploring approaches to selling, the benefits of, and barriers to, selling are presented as well as strategies to maximise sales. The chapter is therefore essentially a more practically based one, but needs to be read in conjunction with the chapters on consumer behaviour, guest service and journey and marketing spas.

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