• Integration and evaluation of QUIC and TCP-BBR in longhaul science data transfers

      Lopes, Raul H. C.; Franqueira, Virginia N. L.; Duncan, Rand; Jisc, Lumen House; University of Derby, College of Engineering and Technology; Brunel University London, College of Engineering, Design and Physical Sciences (EDP Sciences, 2019-09-17)
      Two recent and promising additions to the internet protocols are TCP-BBR and QUIC. BBR defines a congestion policy that promises a better control in TCP bottlenecks on long haul transfers and can also be used in the QUIC protocol. TCP-BBR is implemented in the Linux kernels above 4.9. It has been shown, however, to demand careful fine tuning in the interaction, for example, with the Linux Fair Queue. QUIC, on the other hand, replaces HTTP and TLS with a protocol on the top of UDP and thin layer to serve HTTP. It has been reported to account today for 7% of Google’s traffic. It has not been used in server-to-server transfers even if its creators see that as a real possibility. Our work evaluates the applicability and tuning of TCP-BBR and QUIC for data science transfers. We describe the deployment and performance evaluation of TCP-BBR and comparison with CUBIC and H-TCP in transfers through the TEIN link to Singaren (Singapore). Also described is the deployment and initial evaluation of a QUIC server. We argue that QUIC might be a perfect match in security and connectivity to base services that are today performed by the Xroot redirectors.
    • Privacy verification of photoDNA based on machine learning

      Nadeem, Muhammad Shahroz; Franqueira, Virginia N. L.; Zhai, Xiaojun; University of Derby, College of Engineering and Technology; University of Essex, School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering (The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), 2019-10-09)
      PhotoDNA is a perceptual fuzzy hash technology designed and developed by Microsoft. It is deployed by all major big data service providers to detect Indecent Images of Children (IIOC). Protecting the privacy of individuals is of paramount importance in such images. Microsoft claims that a PhotoDNA hash cannot be reverse engineered into the original image; therefore, it is not possible to identify individuals or objects depicted in the image. In this chapter, we evaluate the privacy protection capability of PhotoDNA by testing it against machine learning. Specifically, our aim is to detect the presence of any structural information that might be utilized to compromise the privacy of the individuals via classification. Due to the widespread usage of PhotoDNA as a deterrent to IIOC by big data companies, ensuring its ability to protect privacy would be crucial. In our experimentation, we achieved a classification accuracy of 57.20%.This result indicates that PhotoDNA is resistant to machine-learning-based classification attacks.