• GASP v2: Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance

      Werner, Duncan; Wiggins, Bruce; Box, Charlie; Dallali, Dominic; Hooley, Jack; Middlicott, Charlie; University of Derby: Creative Technologies Research Group; University of Derby: Department of Media and Perfoming Arts (2016-06)
      The 2016 GASP v2 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance' project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. This poster was funded through the ‘Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme’ (URSS) and presented at the University of Derby Buxton Campus 12th Annual Learning & Teaching conference on Monday 4th July 2016. The poster was also utilised as a contribution to the Creative Technologies Research Group (CTRG) ‘Sounds in Space’ symposium held at the University of Derby on 28th June 2016, at which three pieces of multichannel guitar recordings were demonstrated.
    • Hearing Without Ears

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Georgia Institute of Technology, 22/06/2014)
      We report on on-going work investigating the feasibility of using tissue conduction to evince auditory spatial perception. Early results indicate that it is possible to coherently control externalization, range, directionality (including elevation), movement and some sense of spaciousness without presenting acoustic signals to the outer ear. Signal control techniques so far have utilised discrete signal feeds, stereo and 1st order ambisonic hierarchies. Some deficiencies in frontal externalization have been observed. We conclude that, whilst the putative components of the head related transfer function are absent, empirical tests indicate that coherent equivalents are perceptually utilisable. Some implications for perceptual theory and technological implementations are discussed along with potential practical applications and future lines of enquiry.
    • Inside-outside: 3-D music through tissue conduction

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (24/03/2015)
      Eliciting an auditory perception by means of mechanical transduction bypassing the peripheral hearing apparatus has been recorded as early as the 16th century. Excluding its audiometric use to assess ear pathology, bone and soft tissue conduction has received very little interest until the last two decades. Previous work during this time (Stanley and Walker 2006, MacDonald and Letowski 2006) has indicated robust lateralization is feasible via mechanical transduction. We have extended this, adding the front-back and up-down axes.
    • Tissue-conducted spatial sound fields

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Institute of Acoustics, 14/10/2014)
      We describe experiments using multiple cranial transducers to achieve auditory spatial perceptual impressions via bone (BC) and tissue conduction (TC), bypassing the peripheral hearing apparatus. This could be useful in cases of peripheral hearing damage or where ear-occlusion is undesirable. Previous work (e.g. Stanley and Walker 2006, MacDonald and Letowski 2006)1,2 indicated robust lateralization is feasible via tissue conduction. We have utilized discrete signals, stereo and first order ambisonics to investigate control of externalization, range, direction in azimuth and elevation, movement and spaciousness. Early results indicate robust and coherent effects. Current technological implementations are presented and potential development paths discussed.