• The alternative document exhibition.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016)
      Artists: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Rochelle Haley, David Brazier & Kelda Free, Hector Canonge, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Chris Green & Katheryn Owen, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson, Bartram O’Neill. Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document exhibition at University of Lincoln seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. An accompanying symposium to the exhibition was held in Lincoln Performing Arts Centre on Saturday 13th February 2016 with a keynote address by Tim Etchells, and opened with a performance by Jordan McKenzie on the evening of Friday 12th February 2016.
    • The Alternative Document symposium.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016-02)
      Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document symposium, which accompanies the opening of the exhibition of the same name at University of Lincoln, seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. A guest edited edition of Studies in Theatre and Performance will be published from the project as a whole in the near future. The symposium was originated and led by Angela Bartram. The day coincided with the launch of the exhibition of the same name, and featured presentations by the artists in the exhibition (plus others). Tim Etchells delivered the symposium's keynote paper, and Jordan McKenzie gave a keynote performance to open the event at the same time as the launch of the accompanying exhibition on the evening of Friday 12 February 2016. Presenters: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Annalaura Alifuoco, Hector Canonge, Ana Carvalho, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Stewart Collinson, Kate Corder, Rochelle Haley, Min Kim, Sophie Kromholz, Anya Lifting, Chiara Passa, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson. Created and led by Angela Bartram as part of the Alternative Document project. The symposium took place at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, 12-13 February 2016.
    • Be your dog

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (KARST Gallery, Plymouth, 06/11/2016)
      In partnership with the Live Art Development Agency, 'Be Your Dog' is a project that aims to transcend the hierarchies of pet and owner. The project sees humans and their dogs aim to demonstrate a connection with each other based on mirrored actions that demonstrate empathy and equality. This public event is a result of workshops, and you may see pairs sitting or laying together, looking in each others eyes, or involved in small reciprocal actions. Of course this might not happen, as all are collaborators and the dogs will bring their own contribution to the work, but whatever happens you will see collaborating pairs being responsive in whatever way they deem right.
    • Collaborating animals: Dog and human artists.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (University of Adelaide, 2017)
      Be Your Dog was a Live Art Development Agency DIY funded project that aimed to explore and analyse relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept of two companions are necessary for a functional co-species cohabition. This is in response to scientific findings in animal behavioural studies that suggests hierarchy is unproductive in interspecies domestic cohabitation, and that non-human animals respond to other beings through emotional contagion and empathy. Palagi, Nicotra and Cordoni state in Rapid Mimicry and Emotional Contagion in Domestic Dogs “emotional contagion, a basic building block of empathy, occurs when a subject shares the same affective state of another,” which the project tests and explores with selected artists and their dogs. The project sees participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other, and with other pairs to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. Essentially, the project tests scientific findings through art practice, and concludes that it is possible to learn about, and relate to the cohabiting animals when empathy and equality is engaged instead of dominance. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. Analysis of Be Your Dog was presented as a video paper, ‘Collaborating Animals: Dog and Human Artists’ presented at Animal Intersections, at the 7th AASA Conference at University of Adelaide, 3-5 July 2017. Reworked video footage from the public event included in the conference’s accompanying exhibition at Peanut Gallery and Nexus Arts, Adelaide, 4-16 July 2017. Additionally, he paper, ‘Collaborative Animals: Dogs and Humans as Co-Working Artists, was presented at the conference ‘Living With Animals/Seeing with Animals, 22-26 March 2017 at Eastern Kentucky University.
    • Collaborative animals: Dogs and humans as co-working artists.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (Eastern Kentucky University, 2017-03)
      Be Your Dog was a Live Art Development Agency DIY funded project that aimed to explore and analyse relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept of two companions are necessary for a functional co-species cohabition. This is in response to scientific findings in animal behavioural studies that suggests hierarchy is unproductive in interspecies domestic cohabitation, and that non-human animals respond to other beings through emotional contagion and empathy. Palagi, Nicotra and Cordoni state in Rapid Mimicry and Emotional Contagion in Domestic Dogs “emotional contagion, a basic building block of empathy, occurs when a subject shares the same affective state of another,” which the project tests and explores with selected artists and their dogs. The project sees participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other, and with other pairs to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. Essentially, the project tests scientific findings through art practice, and concludes that it is possible to learn about, and relate to the cohabiting animals when empathy and equality is engaged instead of dominance. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. Analysis of Be Your Dog was presented as a video paper, ‘Collaborating Animals: Dog and Human Artists’ presented at Animal Intersections, at the 7th AASA Conference at University of Adelaide, 3-5 July 2017. Reworked video footage from the public event included in the conference’s accompanying exhibition at Peanut Gallery and Nexus Arts, Adelaide, 4-16 July 2017. Additionally, he paper, ‘Collaborative Animals: Dogs and Humans as Co-Working Artists, was presented at the conference ‘Living With Animals/Seeing with Animals, 22-26 March 2017 at Eastern Kentucky University. The project was housed by KARST, Plymouth, accompanying photographs by Dom Moore.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      A paper was delivered remotely at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference at Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius, via two performing 'bodies'. The 'script' for these bodies was exhibited in the Performance Ephemera exhibition as a paper document at Practice Gallery, University of Worcester. The paper abstract for Vilnius: The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries (displaced)

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami and "Here and There: Two Works, Ten Countries" for The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place (Vilnius).This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami acting as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. The work distances the performers bodies, despite their being ‘present’ as audience through Skype and mobile phone. It explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant. The paper displaced the authors: one was in her living room whilst the other was at the conference, yet only one spoke. The text in Irish was delivered from the 'script' by the author in her home, whilst the other gave her role to a conference delegate at the start of the session. A role he had no idea he would take prior to walking in the room and meeting her invite. The author present at the conference documented the event from the back. Both authors answered questions afterwards.
    • Here and There: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (22/05/2015)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This paper explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Vilnius Academy of Arts, 2016)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. Here we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. This specifically relates to the performance using remote and scripted bodies at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference in Vilnius 2016. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This text offers the script for the performance, which opened up and explored the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of the dynamic of present and absent bodies and artistic agencies, thus seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Recto Verso: redefining the sketchbook.

      Bartram, Angela; El-Bizri, Nader; Gittens, Douglas; University of Lincoln (Ashgate Publishing Ltd., 2014)
      Bringing together a broad range of contributors including art, architecture, and design academic theorists and historians, in addition to practicing artists, architects, and designers, this volume explores the place of the sketchbook in contemporary art and architecture. Drawing upon a diverse range of theories, practices, and reflections common to the contemporary conceptualisation of the sketchbook and its associated environments, it offers a dialogue in which the sketchbook can be understood as a pivotal working tool that contributes to the creative process and the formulation and production of visual ideas. Along with exploring the theoretical, philosophical, psychological, and curatorial implications of the sketchbook, the book addresses emergent digital practices by way of examining contemporary developments in sketchbook productions and pedagogical applications. Consequently, these more recent developments question the validity of the sketchbook as both an instrument of practice and creativity, and as an educational device. International in scope, it not only explores European intellectual and artistic traditions, but also intercultural and cross-cultural perspectives, including reviews of practices in Chinese artworks or Islamic calligraphy, and situational contexts that deal with historical examples, such as Roman art, or modern practices in geographical-cultural regions like Pakistan.
    • Unsettling action and text: a collaborative experience.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Routledge, 2016)
      The original abstract for this text was written in 2009, and reflected the beginning of a collaboration informed by two individuals’ research confidences and disciplines. A work titled ‘Oral/Response’, which combined the documentation of a performance within its structure, allowed a conversation to emerge between disciplines and ways of working, of live action and its textual documentation. ‘Oral / Response’ explored the dynamic, but often disjointed relationship between these two linked but separate elements within the performance itself. The simultaneous dialogue between action and text in this work aimed to highlight the ways in which performance and its legacy as documentation can be reflexive and co-dependent. By making the text as evanescent as the act it describes, this work became the foundation of a new form of practice for both collaborators, a nexus of theory and practice that combined different languages, different ways of knowing and experiencing. The rules and regulations that direct and confine solo compositions in text and action became less rigid, more malleable and symbiotic. In the interim and beyond this work the collaboration has developed in such a way that the distinction between these disciplines, specifically in critical theory and arts practice, has become insignificant. While initially the partnership provided access to each other’s disciplines there is now fluidity, confidence, and trust whereby the roles ascribed to each varies depending on the requirement of the work. The lines have become blurred, and the separation of roles foggy allowing each collaborator the safety and space to take risks by entering domains that are less familiar research methodologies. Therefore the collaboration, aside from the actual work produced, has a significant extra dimension - it allows each partner to become confident and articulate in the others field. Dynamic elements have been liberated for the possibility of an analysis of the range of co-efficiencies and motivations that abound from this fusion, and speaks of the nature of collaboration itself. A reflexivity in approach and position has reshaped, informed, and re-informed the possibilities for emergent research, where trust allows each participant to be confident in a range of methods for creating knowledge. This chapter traces the development of the collaborative relationship from its beginning in two distinct areas of expertise and strength to a partnership where there is now more overlapping of roles.