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      Lane, Kit; University of Derby (2014-05)
      A variety of source material was used including original photographic and video images, computer generated imagery and Creative Commons licensed images. A lack of suitable rigging positions for projectors was overcome by utilising a single projector and a projection mapping system in place of three projectors.
    • 3-D Sound: Massive and minute

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (2006-06)
      A Technical, perceptual and aesthetic exploration of cellular "multi-scale" artificial auditory environments
    • 32 significant moments: An artist's practice as research.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby ([Self-published], 01/03/2014)
      The booklet is 23,000 words and is structured with an introduction and the SASs are shown as charts on several pages. Then the main body of the book is in thirty two sections. Each section starts at on a fresh page and can involve a quote from the studio, photographs, text that explains the moment and on twelve occasions an in-depth essay into the moment captured. The book is written in a creative fun manner.
    • 3D EDM (Electronic Dance Music)

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; University of Derby (2016)
      This presentation discusses my work with Sonic Emotion’s Wave Field Synthesis system - Wave 1. I have spacialized a pre-recorded EDM performance (consisting of 4 stereo tracks) to investigate how my stereo work translates to 3D and the potential uses of 3D sound within a club environment.
    • Acting alone

      Hunt, Ava; Branson, Tilly; Scott, Ivan; University of Derby (2016)
      Acting Alone is a practice-as-research solo performance (ACE funded; Amnesty International Derbyshire commission) which toured nationally/ internationally during (2014-2016). An autobiographical provocation inspired by the Israeli/Palestinian conflict based on Hunt’s experience of witnessing Playback theatre in the West Bank. The performance presented this human rights conflict to international audiences asking - can one person make a difference? Historical characters, who acted heroically, against the unheroic acts of Hunt in Palestine where woven throughout. This immersive piece created a strong performer/audience relationship which created powerful moments, during the performance, of audience participation e.g. joining in, helping, with small tasks contributing to the storytelling, leading to the final transformative moment when the audience would be invited to complete the show by crossing the dramaturgical divide. Acting Alone performed to multi-faith communities, studio theatres, non-theatre venues, schools, and at the Just Festival Edinburgh Fringe (receiving 5 star reviews) . The artistic and creative design of Acting Alone was inspired by Boal’s Forum Theatre, where audiences, as Spect-actors, are invited to rehearse a revolutionary act challenging their oppression, however, Acting Alone explored the role of the by-stander or the tritagonist. The tritagonist position is neither protagonist nor antagonist but opens up the third role exploring the agency of the international community. Performances and papers were presented and performed at academic conferences in UK, Ireland, New Zealand, USA and Sweden where Dr Rand (Massey University New Zealand) presented a paper to the IFTR conference inspired by the production entitled: Re-Enacting Palestine and the Performance of Credibility. Detailed responses from audiences (over one thousand) demonstrated discourse, political activism as well as controversial commentary including accusations of falsification and anti-Semitism. Enquiry into the by-stander or tritagonist role through audience/performer immersion, highlighted this new area of knowledge and practice which will be developed in Hunt’s forthcoming PhD.
    • Acting alone

      Hunt, Ava; Branson, Tilly; University of Derby (2016)
      Acting Alone was written and performed by Ava Hunt with dramaturgy and direction by Tilly Branson. This creative and artistic research used autobiographical solo performance explored social/political engagement through the creation and structure of the performer/audience relationship. The piece used autobiographical, verbatim and documentary theatre approaches demonstrating the complexities of being an artist making applied theatre. The piece enquired into the risks of taking direct action or experiencing the fear and humiliation of inaction. Retelling Hunt’s experience in a refugee camp watching a piece of Playback Theatre performed by Palestinian theatre company – The Freedom Theatre, this witnessed event was returned to throughout against other intertwining narratives: presenting historical/heroic characters (Irena Sendler and Rachel Corrie) who took direct action, together with verbatim accounts of people that Hunt met in Israel and Palestine e.g. an outspoken UN Lawyer, a young Israeli soldier from Birmingham. The piece also contains four simple folk tales that are told to help to illustrate the historical and political complexities of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict in an accessible form. Primarily, the piece explores human rights issues from a by-stander/international perspective by weaving participation throughout into a performance provocation, a space in which the audience were invited to cross the dramaturgical divide and engage in the Israeli/Palestinian conflict posing the question - can one person make a difference? Originally commissioned by Amnesty International Wirksworth, this applied theatre practice: Acting Alone toured throughout the UK and internationally performing to a thousand people in different communities, countries and contexts including the Edinburgh Fringe Festival as part of the Just Festival at St Johns Church, where it received critical reviews including: Five Stars from TV Bomb 2016: “Acting Alone .. ingeniously goes against audiences’ expectations regarding both the theatre art-form itself and the handling of the overly yet ineffectively debated topic of the sufferings of Palestinians.” Audiences engaged positively in the discourse created by this artistic research although for some the Israeli/Palestinian conflict is highly controversial and accusations of the piece being unbalanced were received, and the authenticity of the material questioned. Branson and Hunt responded to audience feedback where appropriate recognising that autobiographical and verbatim theatre offers alternative narratives offering audiences insight into Palestinian people’s experiences that are not widely reported. However, when critical reviews such as British Theatre Guide 2016 - Keith Mckenna said “….a thoughtful play given an engaging performance by Ava Hunt…..Theatre can help ensure that those suffering injustice are not isolated. The solidarity of those inside Palestine and those beyond make sure that those wanting change are not acting alone.” The tour enabled valuable primary data to be collected to support the research question creating discourse for audiences to enquire into the by-stander role as part of an international community.
    • Acting Alone - Can one person make a difference?

      Hunt, Ava; Tilly Branson; Ivan Stott; University of Derby; Andy Purves (2015-11)
      Acting Alone is artistic research using solo performance, autobiographical, verbatim and documentary theatricals. Exploring the Israeli/Palestinian conflict through interwoven stories, the piece asks questions of the audience: Can one person actually make a difference? In 2014 Amnesty International (Derbyshire) commissioned Ava Hunt to create a provocation in response to the renewed confliction and humanitarian crises in Gaza. In its exploration of the complex situation faced by those living in Palestine, Acting Alone challenged the theatrical conventions most often experienced by audiences. Using immersive and participatory invitations, the piece encouraged the audience to interact and to cross the dramaturgical divide creating an ending where no-one, including the performer, knows the resolution. This artistic research builds on Hunt’s enquiry and work with artists and educators working in the West Bank, where she worked with children at the Aida Refugee Camp with Dr. Abedelfattah Absourer whose belief and commitment in the use of the arts in the community is to inspire ‘the beautiful resistance’. The performance offered a creative response to this ongoing war, oppression and abuse of human rights opening up a discourse of what is our responsibility and what action is possible from an international community perspective – a performative of hope.
    • An action repeated: a conference paper delivered for the Format International Photography Festival Film & Photography Conference 2015

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2015-04)
      An action repeated by thousands of hands, thousands of times at the pace established for each shift. (Cities & Signs:5, Invisible Cities, Italio Calvino). The presentation is about my research made in developing a commission (New Expressions, Visual Arts Network) to make an artwork in collaboration with a museum. The work will explore the meaning and experience of the working day for the mill workers of the early textile mills.
    • Afterword: Reading mad men in the era of Trump

      Forde, Teresa; McNally, Karen; University of Derby; London Metropolitan University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-12-12)
      This edited collection examines the enduringly popular television series as Mad Men still captivates audiences and scholars in its nuanced depiction of a complex decade. This is the first book to offer an analysis of Mad Men in its entirety, exploring the cyclical and episodic structure of the long form series and investigating issues of representation, power and social change. The collection establishes the show’s legacy in televisual terms, and brings it up to date through an examination of its cultural importance in the Trump era. Aimed at scholars and interested general readers, the book illustrates the ways in which Mad Men has become a cultural marker for reflecting upon contemporary television and politics.
    • Alba

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (Nature Connections, 2016)
      The photographs highlight the bleak and often brutal landscape of the region and the signs of past habitation. The ancient monuments of the stone-age, the strongholds of medieval clan control, sites of conflict, the ruins of the cleared villages are all evidence of a region with a rich cultural history, a culture that was systematically eroded from the early fifteenth century.
    • Alba

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (2014-01)
      This exhibition combines the artist’s love of the Highlands in Scotland and photography with particular interest in historically significant sites and the change in land use in the region.
    • The Alternative Document

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2018-11)
      A guest edited volume by Angela Bartram. Contents: Introduction, by Angela Bartram; Absence makes the heart grow fonder: rethinking intentional material loss in temporary art, by Sophie C. Kromholz; The Italic I – between liveness and the lens, by Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton; I am here – you are there: let’s meet sometime, by Andrew Pepper; HOW – Heathrow Orchard Walks, observations and explorations of vibrant land, by Kate Corder; Documentation with the result of its own performing, by Una Lee; Constructions of the moving body: drawing and dancing, by Rochelle Haley; WRITING/ PAINTING/READING/DRAWING: something not yet, and yet, still something, by Steve Dutton; (Mythologies of) diving, flying and in-between, by Louise K. Wilson; A sense of becoming and alienation: the retrospective in the work of Jordan McKenzie, by Angela Bartram.
    • Antarctica: Live surround exploration

      Crossley, John; Lane, Kit; University of Derby (2016-02)
      A surround sound music composition by John Crossley inspired by the sounds of the Antarctic, with accompanying video sequences. Source material included survey data and images from various research institutes including NASA. As well as photographic and video images, geographical and geological data was manipulated to create original visualisations.
    • Applied theatre solo performance: “Acting Alone” – artist led research exploring boundaries of performer / audience relationships

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (23/04/2016)
      Acting Alone is a solo performance based on seven years of artistic and creative research into the theatrical conventions used within Applied Theatre practice. Hunt’s solo performance research challenges the theatrical form, raises questions and provokes debate through the use of immersive conventions. Acting Alone toured extensively throughout the UK at festivals, theatre venues, in schools and colleges. The piece performed to a wide range of self-selecting audiences – age, class, religion, gender and cultural identity. Verbatim experiences of ordinary Palestinian people where told against documentary accounts of historical and autobiographical stories woven together to provide counter arguments against racist discourse. This applied theatre practice challenged the theatrical boundaries of performer/audience relationships through subtle moments of participation finishing with an invitation to make a difference.
    • Are my cognitive maps the same as yours? …or even, the same as mine?

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (29/01/2013)
      Cognitive map metaphors have become ubiquitous in diverse spatial perception research fields. Tolman's original 1948 formulation referred to way-finding in mazes, O'Keefe and Nadel described particular neural structures that can support spatial behaviours. Other usages may be more metaphorical and may even be incommensurate, one with the other. This talk was a discussion piece to compare and contrast current usages
    • Are training and education mutually exclusive?

      Lane, Kit; Lewis, Simon P.; University of Derby (2015)
      Stage’ at the PLASA London show, October 2015. Our talk was in response to a view held widely in the live event industry that degree level programs do not adequately prepare students for the industry. We outlined the approaches to real-world learning that we have applied over the years in the Sound, Light and Live Event Technology degree and the Technical Theatre Degree and described the Learning Theatre. We presented a number of case studies of high profile graduate destinations.
    • Audio-tactile multimodal perception of tissue-conducted sound fields

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; University of Derby (26/05/2017)
      Approximately 5% of the World’s population, that is, 360 million people, suffer from “disabling hearing loss” and the proportion of over-65s rises to about 33%. 13.4% of geriatric patients have significant conductive components to their hearing loss. For this segment of the population, “music deprivation” may have significant long-term health and wellbeing consequences amounting to diminished quality of life (QoL). Assistive technologies implementing sensory augmentation could ameliorate the effects of lack of ready access to music, the experiential attributes of music listening can be reinstated and tangible benefits might accrue.
    • Be/come closer to home: Narratives of contested lands in the visual practices of Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 27/05/2016)
      Women from Cyprus and Palestine are citizens of divided countries and have experienced conspiracies and invasions that have confiscated their homelands. This article investigates visual practices of women artists and the ways in which they are embedded in the space of each location. It aims to reflect on artists' experiences of borders, location and narrations of homeland. It focuses on the artistic practices of Greek-Cypriot artist Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal, who engage in questioning and challenging issues on homeland, borders, history, citizenship, identity and exile. This article will enquire as to how the idea of homeland 'real or imagined' is represented in visual works and will investigate how the usage of images and narratives can challenge the concept of home. Through the discussion of images this article will consider how these practices serve as a reminder of exile and develop a critical understanding of contemporary events and our reaction to them.
    • The benefits of an arts education

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (University of Derby, 06/12/2017)
      Latest reports suggest the creative industries are under pressure and question whether they can provide a useful education to young people. David McGravie, Head of the School of Arts at the University of Derby explains why an arts education is important and how it can benefit students
    • Between excess and subtraction: Scenographic violence in Howard Barker’s Found in the Ground

      Kipp, Lara Maleen; University of Derby (Centre de recherche VALE, 23/06/2017)
      The article examines the violence produced by the scenography of Howard Barker's Found in the Ground, which emerges out of the play’s formal experimentation. Thematically, the play is rife with violence, such as former Nuremberg judge Toonelhuis’ consumption of the remains of high-ranking Nazis he sentenced to death, the continuous burning of books and the retelling of various murders by the war criminal Knox. Found in the Ground re-visions the collective European memory of the Holocaust; this thematic violence is expanded and subverted by scenographic means, radically reimagining the historical context. The particularity of the spatio-temporal, audio-visual rendering of violence in Barker’s text is the focus of this article. The article relates the play to Artaud’s conception of cruelty and to Lyotard’s thinking on the sublime. It contextualises the play through Barker’s theoretical writings, Lingis’ notion of catastrophic time (2000) and Aronson’s proposition of the stage as an abyss (2005).