• An action repeated: a conference paper delivered for the Format International Photography Festival Film & Photography Conference 2015

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2015-04)
      An action repeated by thousands of hands, thousands of times at the pace established for each shift. (Cities & Signs:5, Invisible Cities, Italio Calvino). The presentation is about my research made in developing a commission (New Expressions, Visual Arts Network) to make an artwork in collaboration with a museum. The work will explore the meaning and experience of the working day for the mill workers of the early textile mills.
    • BlindSpot: a site-specific film installation at the Workhouse, Southwell (National Trust) for New Expressions 3 (New Opportunities Award)

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2015-07)
      The site-specific installation captures the passing of time, tracing the patterns of sunlight and shadow cast by the iron window frames of the building across the floors of the empty dormitories. The Rev. J.T. Becher, the founder of the Workhouse said that ‘An empty workhouse is a successful one’ and the film plays with nothingness and emptiness - the absence of the people the building was designed to hold - and the slow passing of light and time which recalls the lives of the inmates and people who have lived and worked at the Workhouse.
    • Finding lines

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 15/07/2017)
      A series of 10 drawings and one video (titled Faint/Feint) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘Finding Lines – A Celebration Of Drawing And Mark Making’ at Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The ten drawings for Finding Lines are not drawings, they are carbon copies made with small sheets of typewriter carbon paper placed underneath the paper that will be drawn on, and on top of a second sheet of paper which receives the impression of the drawing. Each drawing is made of a series of straight lines drawn with the aid of a set square. Faint/Feint privileges the most basic elements of drawing; pencil, line, paper and tool. The carbon copy is an ‘automatic’ record of the corporeal (and cognitive) act of drawing: it captures all the mistakes I make; the slips, smudges, misalignment and movement - and replicates them. The drawing is a poor performance of an activity that could easily be automated. I have approached drawing as a corporeal exercise that relies on concentration and stamina and which is always imperfect because in doing it I can never match the precision of the computer (although the carbon copy nods to the perfect copying of the photocopier and the printer). Faint/Feint 10 x A1 carbon copy drawings, 60gsm newsprint.
    • Forge

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. The ‘Forge’ installation was part of the DerwentWISE ‘Pulse’ project and was installed in partnership with Quad, Derby. The collaborative work will be developed further through planned engagement with a range of national and international locations and historical narratives, with particular reference to industrialization and the societal impact of technological development.
    • From pillar to post

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-03)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. ‘From Pillar to Post’ was a digital animated film displayed at Strutt’s Mill Belper using projection-mapping technology as part of the launch for the refurbished and remodeled exhibition spaces.
    • From Pillar to Post (and back again): animation projection mapped onto the basement pillars of Strutt’s North Mill, Belper for a Museums at Night Event.

      Shore, Tim; Bosward, Marc; Mellor, Shane; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-05)
      From Pillar to Post (and back again) was projected onto eight of the monumental mill-stone grit piers in the basement of Strutt’s North Mill - the pillars are all that is left of Jedediah Strutt’s first mill of 1786 that burnt down in 1803 – they form the foundation of the ‘new’ mill built in 1804. The abstract animation was composed of short sequences of choreographed blocks of light and colour that was mapped on to the blocky rectangular geometry of the pillars. The animation playback was synched to an audio track using Isadora software. Visitors were able to walk between the pillars affecting the animation by breaking the projection light beam and changing the animation sequences by adding their own audio in the form of shouting, clapping and stamping. Pillar to Post (and back again) created an immersive animation that the audience were able to walk into and affect by interrupting the audio track by making random sounds that changed the order and play of the animation. The audience were able to perform the animation.
    • A history

      Shore, Tim; Jennings, Humphrey; University of Derby (2015)
      'A history' is an artists’ book (edition of 10) made from Corrugated card, tissue paper, newsprint, letterpress, binding screw and string. The book presents repetitions of the phrase “1. the factory, 2. the school, 3. the workhouse, 4. the prison” taken from a note by Humphrey Jennings in his anthology ‘Pandaemonium: The Coming of the Machine As Seen by Contemporary Observers (1660-1886)’. Jennings comments on ‘The History of Derby’ (1817) in which W. Hutton recounts his experiences as a child apprentice at the Derby Silk Mill c.1730: “The abstract horror of the image derives in part from the unspoken acknowledgement of the truth as far as 18th century poor were concerned: 1. the factory, 2. the school, 3. the workhouse, 4. the prison, were all the same building.”
    • Luddite Drawings: a series of drawings (3) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘From Here & There: drawings from Colorado and Wales.

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-09)
      Luddite Drawings is a series of three A1 drawings made with pencil and carbon paper and using guides made in Adobe Indesign. Each drawing consist of two sets of closely aligned lines that cross each other at right angles. Luddite Drawings explores ideas around drawing, work, craft, repetition, copying and the presence and performance of the body in the drawing process. In making the drawings I set myself rules that I could not meet. I devised a game that pitched the production of the drawing against factors like tiredness, concentration, measurement and correctness. My methodology was guided by Marina Warner’s writing about play and the haptic qualities of making and experiential learning, David Pye’s theory of ‘the workmanship of risk and the workmanship of certainty’ and Tim Inglold’s notions of Wayfaring and Transport. The completed drawings were digitised and printed as A2 Giclée prints for the exhibition From Here and There: Drawings from Colorado and Wales. The exhibition was part of an international exchange of contemporary drawings between artists in Colorado and Wales. Exhibition catalogue available.
    • Place Setting: an art installation (comprising 22 China cups, 22 Tesco Toilet Tissue cardboard cores, some IKEA cardboard packaging) for the group exhibition ‘The Most Beautiful Things Cannot Be Seen’

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-02)
      Taking the work of William Morris as its starting point my work for The Most Beautiful Things Cannot Be Seen explores the relationship between beauty, nature and imagination. Place Setting is made up of 22 china tea and coffee cups turned upside down, to create a fairy ring of china ‘mushrooms’ on the gallery floor. The cheap, mass-produced, mostly transfer printed, china challenges William Morris’s romance of craft and production and his command ‘‘to have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful”. Place Setting exploits the transformative power of the ‘ready-made’ or found object. The act of making a tea cup resemble a mushroom, by turning it upside down, responds to the natural world and the flora and fauna that the Arts and Crafts Movement referenced in their work. In arranging the cups in the form of a fairy ring, the work makes a connection between the idealism of Morris and the location of Thornton. It is a place setting rich in folklore and myth making from Brontë shrines, Cottingley with its dubious photographic fairies, to nearby Keighley, once the centre of British theosophy and spiritualism.
    • Printing Animation: a conference paper delivered for the Creative Animation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), Edge Hill University

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-07)
      A critical practice proposal that examines how animation can be reclaimed from the ephemeral and digital and returned to a tangible and material visibility. The proposal takes its cue from Disney’s partnership with Xerox and photomechanical printing processes in the late 1950s when in response to the complexity of the animation design for feature animation ‘101 Dalmations’ (1961), Ub Iwerks simplified the ink and paint process by copying the animator’s paper drawing directly onto acetate cell and removing the intermediary inking process. My research methodology involves a reengagement with a mechanical, machine and tool based craft process (screen printing, monoprinting, photocopying and typewriting) not to imbue the discipline in a romantic quasi-medievalism, nor to propose further economies in the industrial production pipeline, but instead to reintroduce notions of serendipity, chance, wrongness, interruption, iteration and materiality. Printing is a rich repository for metaphor: duplication, doubling, remaking, copying, contact. These characteristics allow animation to explore, inhabit and exploit the liminal space between digital production and analogue mechanical processes. This approach also suggests how classical animation production and print processes may be repurposed to create a new hybrid tangible animated state that is visible, material, spatial and plastic - existing outside the conventional notions of animated time.
    • Rebirth: a light and sound show. Animation projection mapped onto the windows of Strutt’s North Mill

      Shore, Tim; Bosward, Marc; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-03)
      Rebirth is a series of looped abstracted animations, made by Poynton and Shore, with sound by Bosward, that was projected onto the windows of the first floor and basement of Strutt’s North Mill Belper as part of the celebrations to mark the museum’s Summer Opening event. The work references the elemental forces that helped shape the mill including fire, water and iron. Strutt’s North Mill was built in 1804 and is one of the oldest surviving examples of an industrialised, iron framed ‘fire proof’ building. Animation sequences were constructed using a convoluted and slow process that draws on both digital and analogue practices. In constructing a ‘slow animation’ sequence the actual animation or movement is made visible to the animator. Through an engagement with a range of machine processes (both analogue and digital) the work is able to foreground the artificial nature of animation, commenting on both animation’s craft legacy and its constructed nature.
    • Thirteen

      Shore, Tim; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (10/09/2016)
      Thirteen interrogates the history and significance of 27/28 Queen Street, Derby, a now derelict building that was once the home of John Flamsteed (1646-1719), the first Astronomer Royal. A series of works, including a digital animation, gifs, digital prints and an artist’s book. The work will be exhibited at the Wirksworth Festival 2016 and also at Derby Cathedral. The publication will include commissioned essays that consider the themes of Thirteen from range of disciplines, it will be published by QUAD. Before moving south to Greenwich in 1675, Flamsteed compiled a ‘great catalogue of the stars’ from a series of observations all based on a Derby Meridian that ran through the back garden of his Derby home. The place from where the position of every other place – on Earth, and in the Heavens - was determined was in his back garden in Derby. Thirteen considers the resonance of Derby having shifted from being the centre or beginning of the world, to being 5 minutes 54.6 seconds behind. Thirteen was commissioned by D-LAB Digital Art in Derbyshire and supported by a University of Derby College of Arts Research grant. Digital animation by Tim Shore. Sound by Michael Brown.