• Here and there: two works, ten countries

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      A paper was delivered remotely at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference at Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius, via two performing 'bodies'. The 'script' for these bodies was exhibited in the Performance Ephemera exhibition as a paper document at Practice Gallery, University of Worcester. The paper abstract for Vilnius: The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries (displaced)

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami and "Here and There: Two Works, Ten Countries" for The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place (Vilnius).This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami acting as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. The work distances the performers bodies, despite their being ‘present’ as audience through Skype and mobile phone. It explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant. The paper displaced the authors: one was in her living room whilst the other was at the conference, yet only one spoke. The text in Irish was delivered from the 'script' by the author in her home, whilst the other gave her role to a conference delegate at the start of the session. A role he had no idea he would take prior to walking in the room and meeting her invite. The author present at the conference documented the event from the back. Both authors answered questions afterwards.
    • Here and There: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (22/05/2015)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This paper explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Vilnius Academy of Arts, 2016)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. Here we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. This specifically relates to the performance using remote and scripted bodies at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference in Vilnius 2016. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This text offers the script for the performance, which opened up and explored the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of the dynamic of present and absent bodies and artistic agencies, thus seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Unsettling action and text: a collaborative experience.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Routledge, 2016)
      The original abstract for this text was written in 2009, and reflected the beginning of a collaboration informed by two individuals’ research confidences and disciplines. A work titled ‘Oral/Response’, which combined the documentation of a performance within its structure, allowed a conversation to emerge between disciplines and ways of working, of live action and its textual documentation. ‘Oral / Response’ explored the dynamic, but often disjointed relationship between these two linked but separate elements within the performance itself. The simultaneous dialogue between action and text in this work aimed to highlight the ways in which performance and its legacy as documentation can be reflexive and co-dependent. By making the text as evanescent as the act it describes, this work became the foundation of a new form of practice for both collaborators, a nexus of theory and practice that combined different languages, different ways of knowing and experiencing. The rules and regulations that direct and confine solo compositions in text and action became less rigid, more malleable and symbiotic. In the interim and beyond this work the collaboration has developed in such a way that the distinction between these disciplines, specifically in critical theory and arts practice, has become insignificant. While initially the partnership provided access to each other’s disciplines there is now fluidity, confidence, and trust whereby the roles ascribed to each varies depending on the requirement of the work. The lines have become blurred, and the separation of roles foggy allowing each collaborator the safety and space to take risks by entering domains that are less familiar research methodologies. Therefore the collaboration, aside from the actual work produced, has a significant extra dimension - it allows each partner to become confident and articulate in the others field. Dynamic elements have been liberated for the possibility of an analysis of the range of co-efficiencies and motivations that abound from this fusion, and speaks of the nature of collaboration itself. A reflexivity in approach and position has reshaped, informed, and re-informed the possibilities for emergent research, where trust allows each participant to be confident in a range of methods for creating knowledge. This chapter traces the development of the collaborative relationship from its beginning in two distinct areas of expertise and strength to a partnership where there is now more overlapping of roles.