• Brain activity and mental workload associated with artistic practice

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; Wilson, Max; Maior, Horia; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 09/02/2018)
      We present the first stage of our on-going artist-driven BCI collaboration, where we equipped an artist with the brain scanning technique functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative practice. We artists are interested in exposing the hidden cognitive processes involved in our creative practice, in order to reuse or integrate the data into our performances. The computer science researchers are interested in collecting unstructured ‘in the wild’ fNIRS data, and to see how the artists interpret the data retrospectively. We highlight some interesting early examples from the data and describe our on-going plans. We will have completed a second data collection before the workshop.
    • Chancel frequencies.

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (20-21 Arts Centre, 2015)
      Chancel Frequencies at 20-21 Arts Centre featured three works especially selected to respond to the former church building as a contemplative space, portraying images of sound, which are otherworldly, and designed to encourage contemplation. Circular projections show vibrations caused by different sound waves through water, filmed as part of her previous Sound Fountains project. In a new site specific work, three shallow steel pools made in the shape of the church window contain motors causing gentle ripples that will be reflected on the surrounding walls. Finally on a wall mounted screen, a film loop shows a single tuning fork shifting between 25Hz and 16Hz – made in connection with Frequency of Trees.This was a commissioned Exhibition at 20-21, from July 9th – October 9th 2015.
    • D.I.Y: Hydrophonics.

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby; University of Chichester (University of Chichester, 2015)
      D.I.Y Too is a new book about “do it yourself” performance, with contributions made by over 30 arts practitioners and collectives. It's a sequel of sorts - or rather; a continuation - to a recent text that platformed a growing community of voices in theatre, art, dance and performance making. Its aim is to articulate and contextualise an ethos and practice within contemporary art called "DIY" theatre and performance. This book is a text that provokes, prescribes, instructs, argues, plays, advises, promotes and describes. Its emphasis is on how theatre makers can encourage and evolve performance making by sharing their theories and practices, to help empower more artists to engage with this way of working. Critically (or theoretically) this book addresses a wide range of perspectives on "DIY" theatre and performance and identifies key axioms and dichotomies between ethos and style. Contributors: Accidental Collective: Pippa Bailey: Simon Bowes: Daniel Bye: Karen Christopher: Helen Cole: Dirty Market: Fictional Dogshelf: Emma Frankland and Keir Cooper: Gob Squad: Donald Hutera: Mamoru Iriguchi: Dan Koop: Lila Dance: Caroline Locke: LOW PROFILE: Rachel Mars: Harun Morrison: Hannah Nicklin: Joseph O'Farrell (JOF): Paper Cinema: Patternfight: Plastic Castles: Sh!t Theatre: Sleeping Trees: Sleepwalk Collective: Tassos Stevens: Shamira Turner, Little Bulb: Uninvited Guests: Hannah Jane Walker: Melanie Wilson: Greg Wohead: Caroline Wright and Helen Paris.
    • The Frequency Of Trees

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (Yorkshire Sculpture Park, 2014-10)
      The Frequency Of Trees is part of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) Open Air collection and has an extremely large footfall (700,000 visitors during 2015/16). Public audiences engage with the research directly when walking through the grounds of the park. Spectators discuss how sound moves and how the body responds. The sculpture comprises of a series of 12 tuning forks tuned to the frequency of different trees within YSP: Oak, Horse Chestnut, Beech and the Cedar of Lebanon in the Formal Garden. The frequency of sound is measured by counting the number of occurrences of an event per unit of time. By measuring the number of times a branch or leaf on a tree moved a certain distance within a set time frame, Locke was able to equate tree movements with Hertz readings, the unit used to measure sound. After striking the tuning forks, spectators are required to listen for the resonating frequencies that continue long after the initial strike – these are the pure musical tones that exist after the initial high overtones recede. The commonly stated human hearing range is 20–16000Hz thus the 16Hz fork appears to have no sound, however , spectators can still enjoy the sight of sound by watching the fork resonate. The work is used as generator for learning on various educational programmes at Yorkshire Sculpture Park .
    • The Hastings sound fountain

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent Unviersity (FACT, Liverpool, 2015-07)
      The term ‘ Performing Data’ was first used by the artist Dr Rachel Jacobs and became the title of Caroline Locke’s research residency at Nottingham University. The Performing Data Project was developed by an interdisciplinary group of HCI (Human, Computer, Interaction) researchers, artists and creative technicians based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute. The Hastings Sound Fountain was developed as part of this project and residency. Locke makes works that ‘Perform data’, revealing data to an audience in various embodied forms - sometimes slowly, sometimes live, to elicit emotions, engage the imagination, extend understanding and to inspire an audience to reflect. Caroline makes links to our natural world and finds ways to expose the beauty in nature. She is keen to find innovative ways of communicating scientific and environmental research to a public audience. The Hastings Sound Fountain at FACT was controlled by data being sent LIVE from Hastings Pier. A sensor on the end of the pier is recording the rise and fall of the sea level and the levels trigger the rise and fall in the sound frequencies being sent to the Fountain. As the sensor tracks the rise and fall of the sea, frequencies sweep through the Sound Fountain, causing ripples and waves on the water surface. A visualisation of the live data and footage of the sea beneath the sensor is projected or viewed on a monitor close to the fountain. Locke contributed to a series of workshops, talks, and events, which were scheduled to facilitate visitor understanding at FACT in Liverpool in July 2015. The Hastings Sound Fountain was exhibited as part of these events.
    • Heart sensing sound fountain

      Locke, Caroline; The University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (FACT, Liverpool, 2015-07)
      The term ‘ Performing Data’ was first used by the artist Dr Rachel Jacobs and became the title of Caroline Locke’s research residency at Nottingham University. The Performing Data Project was developed by an interdisciplinary group of HCI (Human, Computer, Interaction) researchers, artists and creative technicians based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute. The Heart Sensing Sound Fountain was developed as part of this project and residency. The previous work Sound Fountains, where sound is visualized through water has been developed so that audiences can engage in their own unique and sometimes very personal experience with the Sound Fountain, using their body data to make changes within an installation environment. The audience (or 2 participants) are asked to place their fingertip on top of the heart shaped sensor, to hold in place for as long as they like to see what happens to the Sound Fountains. The sensor locates the participant’s heart rate and their pulse triggers tones, which are sent to the Sound Fountains. They watch as the waves synchronize with their own beating heart. The sculpture involves live performance on many levels. An element of performance is at the end of the data flow in the water but also between the two individuals facing each other and the dialogue that occurs between them. The surrounding audience watch as the two participants become performers. Perhaps there is a feedback loop as participants attempt to slow down their heart rate or it speeds up with levels of engagement/excitement. The activity is part of a long period of original and significant research and development. Locke’s research, in its wider sense, reflects on the relationship between the spectator and the performer and the opportunities to blur their respective roles within Contemporary Art Practice. It investigates ways in which a spectator can engage more in the work through direct interaction. For example, spectators became performers and integral to the work by triggering sensors within the exhibition space, allowing their presence to orchestrate changes within the installation.
    • Interactive sound fountains

      Locke, Caroline (25/11/2011)
    • Making a rock

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (N/A, 16/03/2016)
      This collaborative project with Caroline Locke and Debra Swann was developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer Lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition at The Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium in 2016 and then developed further as part of an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017. Making a Rock is an ongoing durational performance that attends to the physical construction of a large-scale object (a cardboard ‘rock’) embracing the potential of duration, temporality, liveness and performativity. Using photography, video and sound to document this process of making, the enquiry expands the vocabulary of sculptural practice through the focus of the durational aspects of making and the idea of the sculptural work in flux. This enquiry explores the process of making and collecting data. It investigates how we understand objects and sound and the properties and qualities they possess. Through the artist/object relationship a focus on the evolution of an object and the artist’s process is examined. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The artists have explored the different kinds of data gathered from their combined artistic practices. They extract the data and rework it in live performances and exhibited works. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity. The composition is cut onto a vinyl record which is played over and over within the exhibition space. The sound of the activity becomes abstract and otherworldly when amplified. Mundane working involves repetition – a strange rhythm develops – a kind of chant.
    • Making shaking shifting pouring sawing

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp; The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Primary Studios Nottingham, 2017-02)
      Making Shaking Shifting Pouring Sawing is an installation, exhibition and live Performance. The work explores the idea of repeated and intensive labour and the data gathered in relation to artistic and domestic processes. The exhibits and performances feature made and found objects and the data collected in relation to repeated activities whilst making or working with the objects. The data is retrieved as sound, physical data, digital imagery and animation. These elements are exposed as part of live performances and exhibited kinetic sculptures and devices. The project involved collaborative research explored by Caroline Locke and Debra Swann and was initially developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collectiv National, Antwerp Gallery in 2016 (Collectiv National, was founded by Janna Beck and is linked to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium). An exhibition and live performance at Primary, Nottingham followed in 2017. As an extension of Locke’s residency at Nottingham University, based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute, Locke and Swann worked with Assistant Professor Max Wilson and Horia Maior, who equipped Debra with a brain scanning device known as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative making processes. Visualisations of the recorded brain data were projected as part of a live performance and exhibition. The brain data was also used to control various devices as part of the exhibition. For example: a motor uses the rate of brain activity to speed up and slow down a record deck. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The ‘music’ was cut onto a vinyl disc and played on the brain data controlled device. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity – The brain effort during the making activity controls the speed at which the record plays during the performances and exhibitions. Shaking Shelves is a kinetic sculpture which is also part of the live performance and exhibition. The brain effort during a cleaning and sweeping process controls the speed at which the motor attached to a shelving unit spins. The shelves are loaded with domestic items and the vibration and movement of the motor causes the shelves to vibrate and the items to shake and sometimes fall. The extended Performing Data research is funded by the Arts Council and explores ideas around body rhythms and physical data in connection with labour, multi-tasking and women's work. Locke is interested in capturing data and using it to control kinetic sculptures within an immersive environment.
    • Singing Pools

      Locke, Caroline (17/04/2013)
    • Sound Fountain

      Locke, Caroline (21/06/2010)
    • Water-fountain-sculpture

      Locke, Caroline; Wermers, Nicole; Pye, William; Janzing, Godehard; Bussman, Valerie; German Forum for Art History; University of Derby (Henry Moore Institute, 28/01/2017)
      This seminar event explored how water and fountains have been used by artists and sculptors for a variety of purposes. The afternoon began with a discussion of Marcel Duchamp's 'Fountain' (1917) and examined more recent examples of water sculpture such as the memorial at Ground Zero. In collaboration with Dr Godehard Janzing (Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte), Valerie Bussmann (independent), Nicole Wermers (artist), William Pye (artist) and Caroline Locke (artist). Godehard Janzing discussed ‘Falling Waters at Ground Zero: when Terrorism turns into Nature’ and how the use of the symbolism of water becomes problematic in this context. Valerie Bussmann continued the theme of the city with an examination of the relationship Paris has with water as both necessity and art. Water as a sculptural material was explored by Nicole Wermers, focusing specifically on her 2011 series ‘Wasserregal’ (‘Watershelves’). William Pye has long been inspired by water and first introduced it as a major sculptural element in his work in the 1980s. Caroline Locke shared the themes of water and vibration, which have formed a key part of her practice and focused on her use of water in connection with her Performing Data projects. She has used her water fountains to animate certain data sets in connection with the human body and environmental data.