• The Alternative Document

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2018-11)
      A guest edited volume by Angela Bartram. Contents: Introduction, by Angela Bartram; Absence makes the heart grow fonder: rethinking intentional material loss in temporary art, by Sophie C. Kromholz; The Italic I – between liveness and the lens, by Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton; I am here – you are there: let’s meet sometime, by Andrew Pepper; HOW – Heathrow Orchard Walks, observations and explorations of vibrant land, by Kate Corder; Documentation with the result of its own performing, by Una Lee; Constructions of the moving body: drawing and dancing, by Rochelle Haley; WRITING/ PAINTING/READING/DRAWING: something not yet, and yet, still something, by Steve Dutton; (Mythologies of) diving, flying and in-between, by Louise K. Wilson; A sense of becoming and alienation: the retrospective in the work of Jordan McKenzie, by Angela Bartram.
    • The alternative document exhibition.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016)
      Artists: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Rochelle Haley, David Brazier & Kelda Free, Hector Canonge, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Chris Green & Katheryn Owen, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson, Bartram O’Neill. Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document exhibition at University of Lincoln seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. An accompanying symposium to the exhibition was held in Lincoln Performing Arts Centre on Saturday 13th February 2016 with a keynote address by Tim Etchells, and opened with a performance by Jordan McKenzie on the evening of Friday 12th February 2016.
    • The Alternative Document symposium.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (2016-02)
      Beyond most ephemeral artwork a memory remains in the mind of the observer and this forms part of the legacy of the fleeting event. However, memory is mostly a personal experience, that shifts, mutates, and fades over time to become distant, different to its origin, and in this way its archival potential is unreliable. To overcome this dilemma a variety of lens-based archival methods have become the tradition of recording the ‘actual’ event in as far as it is possible. Although a recorder, of any variation, can provide footage that gives place and context of the archive document, they present a dilemma – how much do they indicate what it was like to ‘be there’. For recordings are mediated and translated for posterity through the direction of the person holding the device and document their viewpoint and subjective encounter with the work. This creates an archival document open to subjective discussion, as a memorial and work in its own right, and of which alternatives are often sought. It is in this way that the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation are abandoned in favour of a mode of practice that allows for a greater level of mutual critique. For documentation is also subject to the same vagaries of time as the event itself. Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived Peggy Phelan represents a position on this subject of “you have to be there” in order to understand the ephemeral. Phelan acknowledges that a performance “become[s] itself through disappearance.” This argument draws empathy, but in practice is a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing ephemeral works, for how is the work to exist beyond the moment if not recorded in some way. The Alternative Document symposium, which accompanies the opening of the exhibition of the same name at University of Lincoln, seeks to expand on the idea of the ephemeral and its loss, by offering a platform where different acts of legacy can be witnessed and discussed. A guest edited edition of Studies in Theatre and Performance will be published from the project as a whole in the near future. The symposium was originated and led by Angela Bartram. The day coincided with the launch of the exhibition of the same name, and featured presentations by the artists in the exhibition (plus others). Tim Etchells delivered the symposium's keynote paper, and Jordan McKenzie gave a keynote performance to open the event at the same time as the launch of the accompanying exhibition on the evening of Friday 12 February 2016. Presenters: Tim Etchells, Jordan McKenzie, Annalaura Alifuoco, Hector Canonge, Ana Carvalho, Rachel Cherry, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker & Clare Thornton, Stewart Collinson, Kate Corder, Rochelle Haley, Min Kim, Sophie Kromholz, Anya Lifting, Chiara Passa, Andrew Pepper, Louise K Wilson. Created and led by Angela Bartram as part of the Alternative Document project. The symposium took place at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, 12-13 February 2016.
    • Be your dog

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (KARST Gallery, Plymouth, 06/11/2016)
      In partnership with the Live Art Development Agency, 'Be Your Dog' is a project that aims to transcend the hierarchies of pet and owner. The project sees humans and their dogs aim to demonstrate a connection with each other based on mirrored actions that demonstrate empathy and equality. This public event is a result of workshops, and you may see pairs sitting or laying together, looking in each others eyes, or involved in small reciprocal actions. Of course this might not happen, as all are collaborators and the dogs will bring their own contribution to the work, but whatever happens you will see collaborating pairs being responsive in whatever way they deem right.
    • Collaborating animals: Dog and human artists.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (University of Adelaide, 2017)
      Be Your Dog was a Live Art Development Agency DIY funded project that aimed to explore and analyse relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept of two companions are necessary for a functional co-species cohabition. This is in response to scientific findings in animal behavioural studies that suggests hierarchy is unproductive in interspecies domestic cohabitation, and that non-human animals respond to other beings through emotional contagion and empathy. Palagi, Nicotra and Cordoni state in Rapid Mimicry and Emotional Contagion in Domestic Dogs “emotional contagion, a basic building block of empathy, occurs when a subject shares the same affective state of another,” which the project tests and explores with selected artists and their dogs. The project sees participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other, and with other pairs to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. Essentially, the project tests scientific findings through art practice, and concludes that it is possible to learn about, and relate to the cohabiting animals when empathy and equality is engaged instead of dominance. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. Analysis of Be Your Dog was presented as a video paper, ‘Collaborating Animals: Dog and Human Artists’ presented at Animal Intersections, at the 7th AASA Conference at University of Adelaide, 3-5 July 2017. Reworked video footage from the public event included in the conference’s accompanying exhibition at Peanut Gallery and Nexus Arts, Adelaide, 4-16 July 2017. Additionally, he paper, ‘Collaborative Animals: Dogs and Humans as Co-Working Artists, was presented at the conference ‘Living With Animals/Seeing with Animals, 22-26 March 2017 at Eastern Kentucky University.
    • Collaborative animals: Dogs and humans as co-working artists.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (Eastern Kentucky University, 2017-03)
      Be Your Dog was a Live Art Development Agency DIY funded project that aimed to explore and analyse relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept of two companions are necessary for a functional co-species cohabition. This is in response to scientific findings in animal behavioural studies that suggests hierarchy is unproductive in interspecies domestic cohabitation, and that non-human animals respond to other beings through emotional contagion and empathy. Palagi, Nicotra and Cordoni state in Rapid Mimicry and Emotional Contagion in Domestic Dogs “emotional contagion, a basic building block of empathy, occurs when a subject shares the same affective state of another,” which the project tests and explores with selected artists and their dogs. The project sees participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other, and with other pairs to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. Essentially, the project tests scientific findings through art practice, and concludes that it is possible to learn about, and relate to the cohabiting animals when empathy and equality is engaged instead of dominance. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. Analysis of Be Your Dog was presented as a video paper, ‘Collaborating Animals: Dog and Human Artists’ presented at Animal Intersections, at the 7th AASA Conference at University of Adelaide, 3-5 July 2017. Reworked video footage from the public event included in the conference’s accompanying exhibition at Peanut Gallery and Nexus Arts, Adelaide, 4-16 July 2017. Additionally, he paper, ‘Collaborative Animals: Dogs and Humans as Co-Working Artists, was presented at the conference ‘Living With Animals/Seeing with Animals, 22-26 March 2017 at Eastern Kentucky University. The project was housed by KARST, Plymouth, accompanying photographs by Dom Moore.
    • Documents, Alternatives #1

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Airspace Gallery, Stoke on Trent, 2017-11)
      ‘Documents, Alternatives #1’ is an exhibition presenting works by 15 internationally exhibited artists and artist collaborations. Built upon a series of time-based works that rely on performative process and created experience, the project 'Documents, Alternatives,' which comprises linked exhibitions (of which this is number 1), symposium and text, aims to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this it acknowledges their need for change, so that they remain continuous and in process, through staging a practical and thought provoking visual discussion. Positioned to operate at the intersection of artistic and academic domains, the project is as creatively stimulating and progressively invigorating as theoretically interrogatory and analytical. This is an experimental, discursive curatorial strategy whereby the document becomes a new artwork and the artwork becomes a new document to keep the ephemeral evolving and in transition. ‘Documents, Alternatives #1’ and the project to which it belongs, are in response to, and as a continuation from the pilot exhibition that curated a selection of international artists’ work to demonstrate the ways in which ephemeral practice can be renewed through re-staging the document as new artwork. It is a re-drafting, re-configuration, re-grouping and re-working of this pilot, ‘The Alternative Document’ at Project Space Plus in Lincoln (13th February - 11th March 2016), and as such it continues the conversation and the lifespan of these works and their relation to others with the exhibition. The project and 'Documents Alternatives #1' are led and curated by Angela Bartram. Includes work by: Angela Bartram, Andrew Bracey, Brazier and Free, Luce Choules, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Tim Etchells, Rochelle Haley, Morrad + McArthur, Andrew Pepper, Louise K. Wilson. The exhibition was accompanied by an artist's talk at Staffordshire University in association with Airspace Gallery as part of Airspace Curriculum on 23 November 2017, and Bartram was commissioned for the window exhibition space, where a new video artwork 'Santa Dogs' showed throughout the duration of 'Documents, Alternatives #1.'
    • Documents, Alternatives #2

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Verge Gallery, Sydney, 2018-01)
      The documentation of ephemeral artwork, works made to be transient, changeable and un-fixed, is often problematic for the intent and premise of creation as it aligns itself with a particular moment, place and viewpoint in time. Lens-based methods are mostly relied upon to communicate actuality and happening and to fix the un-fixed memory of the artwork, and this is part of that problem. Effectively, this type of documentary device works in opposition to the concept of the artwork, cementing into a fragmentary history when all it wants is to be fleeting in its temporarality. The lens-made recording tends to generalise vision and, by extension, it does not fully communicate the experience of ‘being there’ and present. Experience is difficult to replicate through a lens. This is problematic for artwork whose very premise is to be transient and time-based, and for which direct experience is a priority. ‘Documents, Alternatives’ is a collection of interlinked exhibitions that include time-based works reliant on performative process and created experience for understanding, which aim to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this they acknowledge their need for change so to remain continuous and in process through staging a practical and thought provoking dialogue across venues. Positioned to operate at the intersection of artistic and academic domains, the project is as creatively stimulating and progressively invigorating as theoretically interrogatory and analytical. This is an experimental, discursive curatorial strategy whereby the document becomes a new artwork and the artwork becomes a new document to keep the ephemeral evolving and in transition. This is exhibition number 2 in the series. To be true to the nature of ephemera, the discursive environment that is ‘Documents Alternatives’ is curated to map a staging that is in ‘motion’ and responsive to artistic meaning and intention. Here, the artworks learn from their prior incarnations, and respond to a re-grouping with the others in the collection of ‘conversational’ exhibitions, of which they are now becoming familiar, and their own concepts to be kept very much in the present. Moving beyond traditional unsympathetic means used as sole mode of translation, it offers a more effective way of communicating the artwork by keeping it current and active, and by denying its relegation to the historic past. To do this it positions the artwork as document and new work simultaneously thereby creating a generating loop of reflexive and developing activity. The exhibitions foreground fluidity and diversity of translation and includes multiple art voices and modes of output including video, light and holography, text, painting, print, web work, ethnographic environmental trace, jam making, and sound. The 'Documents Alternatives' project is led and curated by Angela Bartram. Artists include: Tim Etchells, Andrew Pepper, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Rochelle Haley, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Luce Choules, Morrad + McArthur, Brazier and Free, Andrew Bracey, Louise K. Wilson, and Angela Bartram. ‘Documents, Alternatives #2 was in the 5% of successful exhibition proposals for Verge Gallery's 2018 programme.
    • Documents, Alternatives #3

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Bath School of Art and Design, Bath, 2018-04)
      The documentation of ephemeral artwork, works made to be transient, changeable and un- fixed, is often problematic for the intent and premise of creation as it aligns itself with a particular moment, place and viewpoint in time. Lens-based methods are mostly relied upon to communicate actuality and happening and to fix the un-fixed memory of the artwork, and this is part of that problem. Effectively, this type of documentary device works in opposition to the concept of the artwork, cementing into a fragmentary history when all it wants is to be fleeting in its temporarality. The lens-made recording tends to generalise vision and, by extension, it does not fully communicate the experience of ‘being there’ and present. Experience is difficult to replicate through a lens. This is problematic for artwork whose very premise is to be transient and time-based, and for which direct experience is a priority. ‘Documents, Alternatives’ is a collection of interlinked exhibitions that include time-based works reliant on performative process and created experience for understanding, which aim to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this they acknowledge their need for change so to remain continuous and in process through staging a practical and thought provoking dialogue across venues. Positioned to operate at the intersection of artistic and academic domains, the project is as creatively stimulating and progressively invigorating as theoretically interrogatory and analytical. This is an experimental, discursive curatorial strategy whereby the document becomes a new artwork and the artwork becomes a new document to keep the ephemeral evolving and in transition. This is exhibition number 3 in the series. To be true to the nature of ephemera, the discursive environment that is ‘Documents Alternatives’ is curated to map a staging that is in ‘motion’ and responsive to artistic meaning and intention. Here, the artworks learn from their prior incarnations, and respond to a re- grouping with the others in the collection of ‘conversational’ exhibitions, of which they are now becoming familiar, and their own concepts to be kept very much in the present. Moving beyond traditional unsympathetic means used as sole mode of translation, it offers a more effective way of communicating the artwork by keeping it current and active, and by denying its relegation to the historic past. To do this it positions the artwork as document and new work simultaneously thereby creating a generating loop of reflexive and developing activity. The exhibitions foreground fluidity and diversity of translation and includes multiple art voices and modes of output, and the work is significantly adapted for this version from those previously staged at Airspace Gallery (Stoke on Trent, 2017) and Verge Gallery (Sydney, 2018). Artists include: Tim Etchells, Andrew Pepper, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Rochelle Haley, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Luce Choules, Morrad + McArthur, Brazier and Free, Andrew Bracey, Louise K. Wilson, and Angela Bartram.
    • Documents, alternatives - a symposium of artistic process and practice.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (20/04/2018)
      The documentation of ephemeral artwork, works made to be transient, changeable and un-fixed, is often problematic for the intent and premise of creation as it aligns itself with a particular moment, place and viewpoint in time. Lens-based methods are mostly relied upon to communicate actuality and happening and to fix the un-fixed memory of the artwork, and this is part of that problem. Effectively, this type of documentary device works in opposition to the concept of the artwork, cementing into a fragmentary history when all it wants is to be fleeting in its temporality. The lens-made recording tends to generalise vision and, by extension, it does not fully communicate the experience of ‘being there’ and present. This is problematic for artwork whose very premise is to be transient and time-based, and for which direct experience is a priority. ‘Documents, Alternatives (#3)’ is an exhibition that includes time-based works that rely on performative process and created experience, which aims to resolve this issue by making the document and artwork reflexive. In doing this it acknowledges their need for change so that they remain continuous and in process through staging a practical and thought provoking visual discussion. The symposium accompanies this exhibition at BSAD, and acts in response to process with artistic practice and the experience of the artwork. It situates a series of opportunities for the experience of process through a structure of colloquialism adjacent to the exhibition, to open the nature of artistic process to critical debate. To enable a dialogue about process (as that exhibited and that discussed) informed by both academic and creative domains, symposium speakers are the artists with work in the accompanying exhibition. Hosted by the Art Research Centre, Bath School of Art and Design BSAD Gallery and BSAD main Lecture theatre. The symposium is staged simultaneously with the exhibition Documents, Alternatives (#3) at BSAD gallery, which is open to the public 20th April – 1st May 2018. The exhibition and symposium are part of the Alternative Document, a project by Dr. Angela Bartram, Associate Professor and Head of Arts Research, at University of Derby.
    • “Does that mean I have to hump Monica?”: the sexual dynamics of a human / nonhuman dog pack.

      Bartram, Angela; Hurley, Paul; University of Derby; University of Southampton (Human-Animal Studies Conference, 2018-08)
      Jacques Derrida said that animal is a name humans “have given themselves the right and the authority to give to another creature. ” This agency of naming separates human from animal, humanity from animality, despite shared behavioural traits. Sex, and sexuality and being ‘in sex’ remind us of animal (in the human and the non-human) primal drives. The genitals reference ‘sex’ (as site, as pleasure, anatomically), and locate where dogs are ‘in heat.’ Dog or human, the heat of sexual enhancement is a force that ignites a biological drive at the expense of cognate sensibilities. It makes us animal, in spite of our species. What does is it to be ‘in heat,’ in the heat of the moment and subject to the impulses of another (species)? Be Your Dog, an interspecies collaborative project at KARST (2016), sees human and dog companions learn the others behaviours and establish empathy. Here, the dogs led the humans (astray) in performative interactions, including those of inter-gender experiences of neutered/intact and sexually receptive/non sexually interested, and a sexually ripe and ‘on heat’ female. This paper, a scripted conversation between Paul Hurley (Be Your Dog, participant) and Angela Bartram (organiser), analyses the investment of sexual tensions brought by the ‘in heat’ canine participant in the group, and her effect on the other dogs and humans.
    • Dogs and the elderly

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (09/04/2019)
      We seek comfort from other beings, which in the absence of other humans often finds a solution in relationships with dogs. The positivity for health is particularly relevant to the elderly, who may be especially isolated and emotionally vulnerable. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried for the dog’s fate should they be separated by entering housing or care facilities, or by illness or death. This seminar discusses the dilemma of leaving a ‘burden’ through the art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly,’ which analyses the importance of the interspecies relationships for physical and emotional health and wellbeing.
    • Dogs and the elderly: significant cohabitation and companionship towards the end of life

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (29/04/2019)
      We seek comfort from other beings and this often finds a solution in our relationships with dogs. Walter Benjamin said “no single dog is physically or temperamentally like another,” which in part attests to our interspecies domestic closeness based on reliance and need. Nowhere is this seen more than in their companionship with the elderly. The positivity for health of a life with dogs is relevant to the elderly, those may feel isolated and vulnerable without another with whom to share life. Here, dogs become a vital companion, alleviating depression and isolation and giving a sense of usefulness. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this concerns being worried of their dog’s fate should they enter managed housing or care facilities, or if separated by illness or death. The ‘burden’ they would leave sees the elderly intentionally deny homing another dog should theirs die. This denial renders the dog a last memorial to the significance of the companionship that informed life. This presentation discusses my art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly’ that focuses on the significance and benefit of interspecies companionship towards the end of life. This project with the Alzheimer’s Society demonstrates how interspecies cohabitation is valuable for emotional health and wellbeing. Participants offer heart-warming and heart- breaking accounts of a lonelier and dog-free life when their current companion becomes their last. The fear of not being able to ensure safe continuing care produces a self-imposed loneliness, one where it seems better to know they will not commit a dog to an unknown future than to benefit from their friendship now. The dog becomes the living remains of a relationship that can no longer be accommodated.
    • Dogs and the elderly: the significance of end of life interspecies companionship.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (05/11/2018)
      We seek comfort from other beings, which in the absence of opportunities to communicate with other humans often finds a solution in relationships with the dogs. Walter Benjamin said “…no single dog is physically or temperamentally like another,” and they bring this individuality to the co-dependence that is living with humans, an interspecies domesticity based on mutual physical and emotional need. The positivity for health of a life with dogs is particularly relevant to the elderly, those who may feel isolated and emotionally vulnerable due to illness, infirmity or being housebound. Their canine companion becomes the energy for life alleviating depression and isolation, creating instead a sense of usefulness to another. Although sharing one’s life with a dog gives purpose and comfort, it also brings anxieties regarding care and separation should that relationship change or cease. For the elderly, this specifically concerns being mindful and worried of the dog’s fate should they enter managed housing or care facilities, or if separated by illness or death. The ‘burden’ they would leave in this situation often sees the elderly intentionally deny homing another dog should theirs die, thus inflicting a self-imposed loneliness. This decision increases sadness and isolation, often with elevated levels of depression becoming a consequence. This illustrated presentation discusses this dilemma through the lens of the social art project ‘Dogs and the Elderly,’ which analyses the significance and benefit of companion relationships towards the end of life. Working with participants from the Alzheimer’s Society’s Memory Café’s in Nottingham, the project analyses the importance of the interspecies relationships for physical and emotional health and wellbeing. Participants, who are interviewed and photographed in their homes with their dogs, discuss their current and past interspecies companions, offering equally heart-warming and heart-breaking accounts as discussions move to a lonelier and dog-free life when their current companion becomes their last. The fear of burden and lack of being able to ensure safe care of a beloved dog once they cannot prescribes a self-imposed loneliness, one where it seems better to know they will not commit a dog to an unknown future than to benefit from their friendship now. The presentation was delivered as part of ARC Artistic Research Forum, De Nieuwe Regentes, The Hague, 5th November 2018.
    • Ephemeral art and documenting the un-documentable.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (06/07/2018)
      Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived when lost to the fractures of time, Peggy Phelan suggests “you have to be there.” Phelan states that ephemera, specifically performance “become[s] itself through disappearance,” which draws empathy with Walter Benjamin’s notion of the “aura of the original.” In practice this a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing such artworks, for how can they exist beyond the moment of making if not recorded, in order to map their histories? Archival devices are however, problematic, for how do we suitably record the remains of these artworks that, by their very premise, deny longevity and fixity? This paper interrogates the critical, sensitive and individualized distance necessary when capturing ephemeral artwork to allow it to remain true to intent. Moving beyond the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation, it interrogates how divergent and sympathetic modes of practice allow for a greater level of sustainable critique. This complex and problematic terrain will be analysed to question if appropriate documents, with the varied and differing demands of works of art, can ever be possible. Based on artworks within ‘The Alternative Document’ exhibition (Project Space Plus, Lincoln UK, 2016, which I curated to include a collection of archival documents reconfigured as new artworks) I discuss the potential for legacy beyond formal and traditional means. Through this, I will suggest how it is possible to move beyond formal academic, artistic and museological conventions when documenting and re-staging ephemeral art.
    • Guest talk: Be your dog.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Live Art Development Agency, 16/05/2018)
      Shaun Caton’s Prancing Poodles and Preposterous Pugs is a visual tour through some of his extraordinary collection of vintage and historic photographs, and an illustrated talk exploring the animal as performer for the camera, live audience, and the collective creative imagination. Looking at bizarre photographs of animals both dead and alive, Shaun will evince their forgotten stories and pinpoint the human relationships within a performance context. Jack Tan’s Four Legs Good is a live revival of the medieval animal trials, where animals who had committed some offence were charged in court, prosecuted and defended by barristers, and sentenced in full hearings before a judge. In advance of the first sitting of the Animal Court at Compass Festival 2018 in Leeds, Jack will give a presentation about the Animal Court and offer advice to all dogs present who may have fallen foul of the law on how to bring or defend a case. Angela Bartram’s Be Your Dog explores relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept that two companions are necessary for a functional co-species co-habitation. The project saw participants and their dogs attend workshops to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection, and strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other and to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. She will talk about Be Your Dog and her other work with animals including the significance of dog/human cohabitation at the end of life, using dog walking as a way to engage community, and giving access to animal theory to animals themselves. Artist and researcher Sibylle Peters will facilitate conversations.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      A paper was delivered remotely at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference at Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius, via two performing 'bodies'. The 'script' for these bodies was exhibited in the Performance Ephemera exhibition as a paper document at Practice Gallery, University of Worcester. The paper abstract for Vilnius: The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries (displaced)

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami and "Here and There: Two Works, Ten Countries" for The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place (Vilnius).This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami acting as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. The work distances the performers bodies, despite their being ‘present’ as audience through Skype and mobile phone. It explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant. The paper displaced the authors: one was in her living room whilst the other was at the conference, yet only one spoke. The text in Irish was delivered from the 'script' by the author in her home, whilst the other gave her role to a conference delegate at the start of the session. A role he had no idea he would take prior to walking in the room and meeting her invite. The author present at the conference documented the event from the back. Both authors answered questions afterwards.
    • Here and There: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (22/05/2015)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This paper explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Vilnius Academy of Arts, 2016)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. Here we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. This specifically relates to the performance using remote and scripted bodies at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference in Vilnius 2016. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This text offers the script for the performance, which opened up and explored the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of the dynamic of present and absent bodies and artistic agencies, thus seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.