• William Melville: The Queen's detective.

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Radio Kerry, 2014-05)
      In this classic detective drama, set in the summer of 1889, Melville’s skills are put to the test as he is assigned to protect the visiting Shah of Persia as Fenian anarchists aim assassinating the royal guest. This drama is based on actual events and creates an intriguing insight into the world of political intrigue, criminality, and espionage that would have existed in late Victorian London. The drama was produced for the audience in county Kerry where William Melville was from and was intended to educate and entertain the listeners young and old about one of the county's most decorated sons.
    • With a little help from my friends: The Irish radio industry's strategic appropriation of social network sites for commercial growth.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (IGI Global, 2017)
      Ireland has faced significant economic hardship since 2008, with the Irish radio industry suffering as advertising revenues evaporated. The difficult economic circumstances have forced radio station management to devise new and cost effective ways of generating much-needed income. The answer has come in the form of Facebook, the leading Social Network Site (SNS) in Ireland. Using Ireland as a case study, this chapter looks at how radio station management are utilising the social network strategically in a bid to enhance their audiences and revenues. Radio station management consider Facebook to be an invaluable promotional tool which is very easily integrated into radio programming and gives radio a digital online presence, reaching far greater audiences than possible through broadcasting. Some radio stations are showing ambition and are realising the marketing potential that Facebook and other SNSs hold. However, key changes in practice, technology and human resources are required to maximise the profit-making possibilities offered by Facebook.
    • Work based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach.

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Moran, Monica Catherine; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2015)
      This report Work-based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach describes the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) funded project of the same name. It focuses on the rationale for, the development of and the piloting of a tool for observing and giving feedback on an individual student’s behavior in an interprofessional team based activity. The study was conducted during 2012–2014 with a project team initially led by the University of Queensland, and included team members from five Australian universities in three states (University of Queensland, University of Technology Sydney, The University of Sydney, Central Queensland University and Curtin University), as well as from the UK (University of Derby) and Canada (University of British Columbia).
    • Working together.

      Johnston, Jane; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • World Heart Day 2017

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      A national campaign that engaged social media, fashion design, publication and media to engage in the world heart day. A diverse visual response to the open theme of the heart, capturing cultural, and humorous characterisation associated with hearts. Engaged media in the campaign and raise awareness of the charity globally.
    • World-class apprenticeship standards: Report and recommendations

      Mieschbuehler, Ruth; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, College of Education, University of Derby, 2016)
      The aim of this research was to identify world-class apprenticeship standards and to make suggestions as to how these could be applied to the English system. By ‘world class’ we mean that the standards described here are acknowledged to be among the best in the world. Thirteen indicators for world-class apprenticeship standards were identified through the research and these have been divided into four sub-sections: (1) training, (2) skills and expertise, (3) recognition and (4) progression. Each of the indicators is explained separately in this report but they have to be understood as being in close relationship to each other. As well as identifying world-class apprenticeship standards the indicators are also designed to compare these standards to apprenticeship standards that are of a good level but do not necessarily feature amongst the best in the world. Identifying and applying standards in apprenticeships is important because apprenticeship training, especially if delivered at a world-class standard, can raise the number of people in employment, increase individual and company productivity and enhance economic growth. The findings from our research suggest that world-class apprenticeship standards require: • extended apprenticeships of between three to four years; • broad and in-depth scientific and industrial skills and knowledge; • the presence of a ‘master’ in the company to train an apprentice; • high-quality knowledge-based education and training; • recognition through an occupational title on completion of the training; • apprentices to acquire all the skills and knowledge necessary to work effectively in an occupation; • apprentices to become skilled workers in an occupational area with a critical and creative approach; and • progression routes into employment as well as into further education and training. This report is based on interviews with seven experts from Australia, Denmark, England, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands and South Korea on vocational education and training with a review of the literature.
    • Writing & responsibility

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Routledge, 2005)
      In a world where literary scandals often end up in court, the issue of responsibility in writing has never been more important. In this groundbreaking study, Carl Tighe asks the questions every writer needs to consider: • What is it that writers do? Are they responsible for all the uses to which their writing might be put? Or no more responsible than their readers? • How are a writer's responsibilities compromised or defined by commercial or political pressures, or by notions of tradition or originality? • How does a writer's audience affect their responsibilities? Are these the same for writers in all parts of the world, under all political and social systems? The first part of this book defines responsibility and looks at its relation to ideas such as power, accuracy, kitsch and political correctness. The second part examines how particular writers have dealt with these issues through a series of often controversial case studies, including American Psycho, Crash and The Tin Drum. Writing and Responsibility encourages its readers to interrogate the choices they make as writers.
    • You anorak!: the Doctor Who experience and experiencing Doctor Who

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013)
    • You're Hired! Job Hunting Online: The Complete Guide

      Hooley, Tristram; Bright, Jim; Winter, David; University of Derby (Trotman, 2016-04)
    • Young children’s views on play provision in two local parks: A research project by early childhood studies students and staff

      Yates, Ellen; Oates, Ruby; University of Derby (Sage, 2019-04-08)
      This article describes a collaborative research project which aimed to elicit the views of children, young people and the local community in relation to the play provision within two local parks that were in need of renovation. It involved 13 undergraduate students on a BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies degree, academics, a local landscape architect, children in two local schools, young people from the local youth club and parents attending the local Sure-Start centre. This article focuses on phase 1 of the project which involved undergraduate students and staff in primary research with children in two schools.13 third year students were enrolled on an option module entitled ‘Creative Opportunities and Possibilities’ which required them to evaluate an outdoor space as part of the module assessment. These students engaged in primary research and produced evaluations of each park, based on photographs and notes taken from site visits. This was followed by primary research with two year 2 classes in two local schools. Findings clearly identified that traditional playground equipment was important to children as well as ‘risky’ play features. Children also preferred play equipment for different ages on the same site, so they could play alongside older and younger siblings. Short term or semi-permanent provision was very popular and a keen interest in nature was expressed. The children’s knowledge and awareness of health and safety was a key finding and they were already very risk-averse. The researchers conclude that involving children in primary research needs careful planning and researchers need to be mindful of how children’s authentic voices can be heard and how they are positioned within the research. Constraints to the approach were recognised, the students were inexperienced researchers and as such the depth and complexity of the data was limited.
    • Young Enterprise: Evaluating the impact of the Team programme

      Moore, Nicki; Sahar, Arif; Robinson, Deborah; Hoare, Malcolm; University of Derby (2016)
      This report sets out the findings of the evaluation of the Team programme conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University in 2016. The project adopted a mixed methodology which focussed on the experiences of staff, students and business advisers in a sample of twenty schools selected from a possible 40 which are funded for the Team programme as part of the DfE Character programme. The research findings are encouraging and show that the Team programme has a positive impact on the development of the knowledge, skills and attitudes required by young people to make a successful transition to learning, work and the adult world.
    • Youth organizations in revolutionary Cuba, 1959–1962: from Unidad to Vanguardia

      Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016)
      The ubiquitous billboards in Cuba featuring the emblem of the Young Communist League (UJC) are part of the landscape of the revolution. The profiles of Che Guevara, Camilo Cienfuegos, and Julio Antonio Mella, staring into a blissful future under the slogan “Estudio, Trabajo, Fusil” (Study, Work, Rifle) are among the most recognizable motifs of communist Cuba. Such organization came from the first three years of the revolution; its existence cannot be taken for granted. The enthusiasm of the early years is not in doubt, but a closer assessment of the search for stability and meaning is timely. Youth is a case in point. The high expectations, uncertainty, and excitement for young people become evident through an examination of the evolution of youth organizations between 1959 and 1962. Initiatives aimed at unity largely coordinated by the Young Socialists (JS), the ascendance of a culture of mass participation with the meteoric rise of the Association of Young Rebels (AJR), and the creation of the UJC in 1962 show the move to selectivity and youth politics as opposed to other, broader initiatives. The story of the youth organizations not only reveals the reasons behind the failure to sustain a mass organization for young people, but also the rapid change and levels of uncertainty to which young Cubans were exposed in the early years of the revolution as they sought to be and become young rebels and young communists within an evolving social revolution