• Tissue-conducted spatial sound fields

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Institute of Acoustics, 14/10/2014)
      We describe experiments using multiple cranial transducers to achieve auditory spatial perceptual impressions via bone (BC) and tissue conduction (TC), bypassing the peripheral hearing apparatus. This could be useful in cases of peripheral hearing damage or where ear-occlusion is undesirable. Previous work (e.g. Stanley and Walker 2006, MacDonald and Letowski 2006)1,2 indicated robust lateralization is feasible via tissue conduction. We have utilized discrete signals, stereo and first order ambisonics to investigate control of externalization, range, direction in azimuth and elevation, movement and spaciousness. Early results indicate robust and coherent effects. Current technological implementations are presented and potential development paths discussed.
    • To the Ladies Turbutt: Three women, three wills and three legacies.

      Flint, Alison Claire; University of Derby (Women's History Network, 2016-09)
      The paper demonstrates that three women from one Derbyshire Gentry family, the Turbutt family through wills and legacies influenced, shaped and controlled the matrilineal line for well over two hundred years. From paper and ink to text and the digital screen the consequences of their decisions reverberate into the twenty-first century. A judicious evaluation of the archival collection of the Turbutt family indicated that this group of records would yield rather more than a regular male oriented family pedigree. The paper argues that through bequests in both life and death the three women had agency to help, guide and empower. It explores the choices made by later generations of the same family that society would otherwise have prohibited; in these choices the women would not only enrage their close male relatives but also later generations of the familial patrilineal line. The paper explores how the platform of letters enabled/allowed women to step out of the hegemonic ideal of domesticity and into a world outside the gates of the landed estate. It will see how legacies and letters afforded two women to play the nineteenth-century stock market, and furthermore, it demonstrates the difference a century made in the nature of the financial subjects about which the Ogston women were writing to determine what and whom was of greatest concern.
    • Towards being a "Good Cuban": socialist citizenship education in a globalized context.

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Springer, 21/10/2016)
      Considering the renewed diplomatic relations with the United States and to a globalized world, the Cuban State is forming global citizens while trying to retain socialist values in the face of increased market liberalization. Since the revolutionary period (1960s), Cuban education has stressed the intersecting values of fervent, resistant patriotism, hard work and active, solidary internationalism, as integral parts of the New Socialist Man/Woman or the “buen revolucionario” (good revolutionary). In this new economic, political and social context the Cuban government, its school system, and parents are challenged with preserving socialism and its accompanying values while preparing its young people for work and life in an evolving society and globalized world. Drawing on school textbooks and a wide range of interviews with young Cubans conducted by three education researchers, between 2011 and 2014, this chapter examines Cuban young people’s struggle to reconcile the contradictions and tensions between these ideals and the pragmatic reality of life, implying the need for new forms of national, international, global citizenship. Cuban youth are demanding a larger role in shaping their society if the government wants to keep them on the island. Consequently, the development of the buen revolucionario is taking on new meaning in the twenty-first century globalized world.
    • Towards ‘regenerative interior design’: exploring a student project

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Derby (Cumulus, 2021-09-28)
      Interior designers should design for regenerative systems in order to achieve advanced sustainability, beyond the current ‘neutral’ sustainable design approach. A broader and more positive regenerative design and development approach supports building social and natural capital within the new ecological paradigm. The interior design discipline has made little contribution to this agenda. This paper thus explores interior design strategies, which relate to regenerative design strategies, through a student project proactively implemented within the Interior Design department at the University of Derby, in an existing 3rd year module. A qualitative research design is used to analyse and code students’ proposals, using a constructivist, grounded theory approach. The results present ‘regenerative interior design strategies’. These varying strategies are used throughout the project, of which the most grounded tap into various social and environmental sustainability benefits. This can inform teaching about sustainability in interior design for a new ecological paradigm.
    • La tradición de la organización comunitaria y la participación social en un preescolar de la Ciudad de México

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; González Peral, Adriana; Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México (El Colegio de SonoraJuan Pablo Editor, 2015)
    • Training Needs Analysis

      Moore, Nicki; Osmani, Argjend; Teched Consulting Services, Ltd.; University of Derby (European Union Office in Kosovo, 2015)
      The training needs analysis was conducted beteeen February and April 2015 for the EU funded project: ICT in Education in Kosovo. The processes required to perform the traning needs analysis have been.  The design of a framework of competences;  The identification of target groups;  The creation and implementation of an online survey to assess the competence of education sector personnel against the competences contained in the framework;  The collation, preparation and analysis of the survey data; and  Reporting the research findings.
    • La transición del preescolar a la primaria ¿Cómo aprenden los niños a leer el contexto escolar?

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México (Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México, 2017)
    • La transición del preescolar a la primaria: El papel de las familias y el rol activo de los niños.

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; González Peral, Adriana; Martínez Valle, Claudia Osiris; The Ibero-American University (Universidad Autónoma del Estado de MorelosJuan Pablos Editor, 2014)
    • Transitory literature or 'Brave New Text'? a comparative analysis of José Agustín's work

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2007)
      This paper presents an aspect of an ongoing research project on the changing nature of the text in the works of the Onda literary movement in Mexico in the mid to late 1960s. The works analysed in this article are the stories 'La tumba' (1963) and '¿Cuál es la onda?' (1968) by José Agustín. The aim of the paper is to examine the triad of the creation/destruction/recreation of the text by identifying the changing roles played by the narrator(s) and the dissolution of the protagonists. The analysis also addresses multiple transcultural influences on the two texts and determines whether the conflicting combination thereof leads to the complete destruction of the text or the appearance of a new narrative form.
    • Troublesome learning journey

      Cottle, Vanessa; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08)
    • A Trusted Voice: The Threat to Irish Local Radio News Journalism

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (Future of Journalism Conference 2021 Cardiff University, 2021-09-22)
      For an anxious public living through the triple threat of biological, environmental, and economic crises, the need for rigorously gathered and trusted news and information has arguably never been more important. The proliferation of fake or unreliable news disseminated by social media, among other sources, puts into sharper focus the need for an independent, robust and publicly funded voice to cut through the nonsense and clutter. Radio remains the most trusted source of news and information in the Republic of Ireland (Reuters Institute 2018) and with 81% of all adults tuning in to radio daily (Ipsos MRBI 2021) news and current affairs output from the Irish Radio Industry is a particularly valuable public service. Much of this is as a result of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland’s licencing conditions, however, this overlooks the fact that local radio’s unique selling point, and that which draws audiences to them and away from the public service broadcaster RTÉ, is their knowledge and coverage of local news, current affairs, weather and sport. Furthermore, the commercial sector is much more adept and responsive to change in response to adversity and new challenges and can be the leader of transformation in the industry (McMahon 2019). As a result, local radio holds its own against the sizeable and well-resourced RTÉ and on average local stations enjoy around 50% market share (Ipsos MRBI 2021). However, the Irish Radio Industry has been experiencing a sustained period of economic hardship since the great recession in 2008 crippled the Irish economy. Add to this the competition for audience attention and advertising spend posed by the digital behemoths Facebook and Google and the picture is somewhat grim and pessimistic for this medium that is relied upon so much by the public for trustworthy news. RTÉ has not been immune to these pressures and it too is in a dire financial situation at present with cuts and asset sales ongoing to balance the books. Local radio news departments are the largest and most expensive cost centres for local radio stations due to the aforementioned quality of coverage offered and are therefore under threat. Less resources will inevitably lead to a reduction in the depth and breadth of news coverage. The primary threat to Irish radio’s news and journalism comes in the form of the agglomeration of radio stations by powerful multinationals into fewer entities. Under this form of structure stations typically cover larger areas but with a more homogeneous output and, crucially a centralised (McDonald & Starkey 2016) and generic news service which is cheap and limited in its scope. This rationalisation of radio has been the trend in the United Kingdom over the past decade (Hendy 2000; Waterson 2020) and the recent takeover of Communicorp, Ireland’s largest commercial radio group, by Bauer Media suggests a similar trend is on its way to Ireland. Using the Irish Radio Industry as its focus this paper draws from interviews with Irish industry professionals and considers what action the industry might take in the coming years and what government measures might help protect radio as a trusted and valued voice.
    • Twenty-first century book studies: the state of the discipline

      Noorda, Rachel; Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Project Muse, 2019-10-23)
    • Twofoldness/threefoldness: Marc Lüders' photopicturen

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars, 2018-11)
      My essay 'Twofoldness/Threefoldness: Marc Lüders' Photopicturen' used as the text accompanying Marc Lüders' exhibition - 'Marc Lüders/Twofoldness' at the Levy Gallery, Hamburg in November 2018.
    • The Ukrainian crisis, the Crimean referendum and security implications for the European Union

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, Skopje, 2014-12-01)
    • The uncertain story of career development

      Bright, Jim; International Centre for Guidance Studies (International Centre for Guidance Studies, College of Education, University of Derby, 2016)
      In this paper, the central role of uncertainty in career development and its implications for counselling, coaching and education practice as well as policy will be explored. It is argued that although uncertainty was recognised in the earliest formulations of career counselling models, it was subsequently largely ignored or deemed unimportant in nearly all of the dominant theories of career development for the remainder of the 20th century. More recently theorists have begun to acknowledge once more the central importance of uncertainty in career development, and more broadly in areas as diverse as science and politics. The reasons and importance of this renewed focus is explored with particular emphasis on chaos and complexity theories. The Chaos Theory of Careers (CTC) (Pryor & Bright, 2011) will be presented as theory that provides a powerful way of understanding the relationship between order and chaos, pattern and surprise as composites not opposites. Accepting that uncertainty is an inevitable, inescapable and ubiquitous part of life leads to new approaches to career development practice, theory and policy.
    • Under my (editorial) thumb: hegemonic masculinity and text ownership in the works of the Mexican Onda

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2010)
      Connell and Messerschmidt's article 'Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept' (2005) re-evaluates the popular term to produce 'a more complex model of gender hierarchy' (829). The notion of hierarchy influenced by power redistribution is the foundation of the present study of the works of the Mexican Onda movement. Instead of adopting an expected gender perspective, this article presents a study of text ownership based upon a narratological interpretation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity as a mechanism of controlling the text. The analysis will examine the power struggle between the first-person narrator and editor with a view to determining the effect this struggle has on character (re)creation. The study will employ Ricoeur's interpretation of non-linear narrative, and various studies of transculturation and its effect on the interpretations of literary texts. The texts analysed in this article include the story La tumba (1964) by José Agustín, Gustavo Sainz's novel Obsesivos días circulares (1969), and Parménides García Saldaña's short story 'Goodbye Belinda' from the collection El rey criollo (1971).
    • Understanding career management skills: findings from the first phase of the CMS LEADER project

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; International Centre for Guidance Studies (2016)
    • Understanding employers' graduate recruitment and selection practices. BIS Research Paper 231.

      Pollard, Emma; Hirsh, Wendy; Williams, Matthew; Buzzeo. Jonathan; Marvell, Rosa; Tassinari, Arianna; Bertram, Christine; Fletcher, Luke; Artess, Jane; Redman, Jennifer; et al. (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, 2015)
      This research examined the approach to graduate recruitment adopted by employers and how this has evolved in recent years. In particular the study aimed to explore patterns in graduate recruitment, behaviours of graduate employers and interactions between graduate employers and universities. It therefore provides a picture of long-term trends in practice from pre-recruitment activities through to entry, induction and beyond, and before, during and after the recession; and indicates the ways in which employers’ thinking about recruitment and selection have, and are, changing and developing. The research was driven by a need to update the evidence and understanding of recruitment practice as the population of graduates has increased dramatically and become more heterogeneous; the labour market has changed, emerging from difficult economic conditions; and there is increasing policy interest in diversity and particularly in social mobility.
    • Understanding the careers cold spots.

      Boys, Jonathan; Hooley, Tristram; Barbone, Lucia; Hedges, Sophie; Spekesser, Stefan; The Careers & Enterprise Company (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2016)
      This paper sets out our cold spots analysis which provides us with some important insights about how opportunities are organised in England. In the report we examine which areas have: high levels of engagement between schools and employers; young people who are making opportunity informed decisions and achieving positive outcomes in terms of education and employment. We also examine the areas in which young people are most likely to experience substantial barriers. This analysis allows The Careers & Enterprise Company to understand where more career support is needed and to direct our resources towards these areas. We hope that it this analysis will also guide the activities of others working in this space.
    • Understanding the part-time researcher experience

      Hooley, Tristram; Kulej, Malgorzata; Edwards, Carol; Mahoney, Kate; Vitae (CRAC, 2009)