• Bonfire of the inanities

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (30/09/2010)
      Times are hard and cuts have to be made, so let’s start by putting an end to verbosity and all those mind-bogglingly long assignments, research papers and reports,writes Peter Lennox, succinctly
    • Book Review: Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity: confronting the fear of knowledge, by Joanna Williams

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-04-04)
      Book Review
    • The boy who cried wolf [Arabic edition]

      Jenkins, Saffy; Broadley, Leo; University of Derby (Harper Collins (Big Cat), 01/08/2016)
      Collins Arabic Big Cat is a guided reading series for ages 3 to 11. The series is structured with reference to the learning progression of Arabic at nursery and primary schools researched especially for Collins. This carefully graded approach allows children to build up their reading knowledge of Arabic step by step. Level 5 books are for children who are ready to read stories with more challenging word patterns or non-verbal sentences with 2 or 3 words, and with total support through illustrations and extensive use of repetition. Double spacing is used between words to ensure children see where each new word in a sentence begins and ends to ensure the focus remains on reading core words. A shepherd boy decides to play a trick on the people in his village by telling them that there is a wolf nearby. But will the villagers believe him when a wolf really does turn up? This witty retelling of the traditional story was written by Saffy Jenkins.
    • Brain activity and mental workload associated with artistic practice

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; Wilson, Max; Maior, Horia; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 09/02/2018)
      We present the first stage of our on-going artist-driven BCI collaboration, where we equipped an artist with the brain scanning technique functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative practice. We artists are interested in exposing the hidden cognitive processes involved in our creative practice, in order to reuse or integrate the data into our performances. The computer science researchers are interested in collecting unstructured ‘in the wild’ fNIRS data, and to see how the artists interpret the data retrospectively. We highlight some interesting early examples from the data and describe our on-going plans. We will have completed a second data collection before the workshop.
    • Brecht in pidgin: Oladipo Agboluaje's mother courage in Africa

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (African Theatre Association, 2018)
      African British performances and dramas mutually share their collective interest in the tempestuous afterlife of colonialism and post-independence and the different vibrations they carry into the present but in Africa’s performance forms and the various cultural ‘beats’. Regardless of their routes to Europe, Africans living in new national spaces of the diaspora yearn for Africa; hence, African British performances that emerge are caught between the longing to present Africa, which they left behind or one that is fading in their memories, and the diaspora with its pervasive pitiless demands. The interpretation of African British plays demands a more nuanced appreciation not only because of the multi-stranded and multi-voiced identities, but because they share a collective interest in the complex ‘afterlife’ following political independence of Africa from the colonialists to the present. Oladipo Agboluaje’s Mother Courage demonstrates that theatrical presentation, informed by the African British playwrights’ identification with the African continent reproduce local, transnational and/or trans-border dimensions. The essay traces the dialogue between Agboluaje’s adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Brecht’s original text, focusing on how the African playwright’s travel between different ‘worlds’, across borders develops into a new web of ideas, characters, and words.
    • The brick eater

      Broadley, Leo; University of Derby (2016-03)
      Illustrated 32 x Picture Book for 4-7 year olds related to issues of the current global obesity epidemic in children. The metaphor for food as a brick, with a central non-human character is the USP of this work. The text is a non-rhyming text that can be translated into world languages and avoids issues of ‘self-loathing’ in children. This simply means that works about obesity should not refer to fatness, or physical size as a measure of obesity as this can lead to identification and victimisation of individuals in class. Current medical research points to the idea that children and adults may be ‘fat on the inside’ and that no obese child in the class should be made to feel that they are identified (by peers) in relation to the story, and that actual health refers to access to balanced diet, enough sleep, physical fitness as well as good nutrition.
    • bricolage, poetics, spacing

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2017-11-28)
      Contemporary concern for bricolage both transcends and supersedes de Certeau’s important intervention that resituated the term as actions undertaken in everyday life. In particular, he engaged the notion of bricolage in ways that presented tactics, evasions, resistances, ruses and even tricks in his consideration of everyday life as practiced. Whilst these considerations may be read, as indeed he asserted, as ‘making do’, there are further possibilities of this term. For example, bricolage may be considered to ‘occur’. In this we may take the anthropologist Hallam and Ingold’s grasp of creativity as something in our bodily and mental response to situations, calm, anxious and otherwise; responding to the detail of a situation, a required or desired action.
    • Brides and widows: Iconic dress and identity in Howard Barker’s costumes

      Kipp, Lara Maleen; University of Derby (Intellect, 01/06/2017)
      One of the strongest recurring motifs in the work of contemporary British playwright Howard Barker is women’s marital status: brides and widows abound in his work. Their status as such is often crucially configured, but also subverted through their costumes (in a Western cultural context). This paper considers the central role that brides and widows play in a variety of Barker’s dramatic texts and identifies some core working principles with regard to his use of costume. It explores the notion of the iconic garment (cf. Hannah 2014) and its influence on these characters’ identities. Drawing on aesthetic discourse, in particular that of the sublime, I analyse how Barker proposes a reconsideration of stable subject identity through these recognisable, yet ambiguous and unstable female figures.
    • 'Bridging' the gap between VET and higher education: permeability or perpetuation?

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (VETNET, 2019-09-22)
      Demands for admission to higher education from vocational routes are widespread across Eu-rope but take different forms, depending on the recognition of tertiary VET or whether sharp-er distinctions between VET and higher education exist. In England, alongside policies pro-moting more employer-responsive tertiary provision, opportunities for ‘bridging’ from voca-tional routes to general university education, and vice versa, have been discussed. The study reported here examined four cases of existing provision supporting transitions into higher edu-cation, potential sites of practices supporting bridging across pathways. Each case provided valued support for progression to higher levels of study; yet these practices focused on exist-ing routes rather than transitions between more academic or vocationally-oriented sites. It is suggested, therefore, that the explicit denotation of separate tertiary provision may be more likely to constrain ‘bridging’ provision than for the latter to help students move beyond their existing route into substantially different forms of higher education.
    • The British Espernatist 10.

      Bareham, Paul; Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Spirit Duplicator, 2018)
    • British invasion: The crosscurrents of musical influence

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014-11)
      Before The Beatles landed on American shores in February 1964 only two British acts had topped the Billboard singles chart. In the first quarter of 1964, however, the Beatles alone accounted for sixty percent of all recorded music sold in the United States; in 1964 and 1965 British acts occupied the number one position for 52 of the 104 weeks; and from 1964 through to 1970, the Rolling Stones, Herman’s Hermits, the Dave Clark Five, the Animals, the Kinks, the Hollies, the Yardbirds and the Who placed more than one hundred and thirty songs on the American Top Forty. In The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence, Simon Philo illustrates how this remarkable event in cultural history disrupted and even reversed pop culture’s flow of influence, goods, and ideas—orchestrating a dramatic turn-around in the commercial fortunes of British pop in North America that turned the 1960s into “The Sixties.” Focusing on key works and performers, The British Invasion tracks the journey of this musical phenomenon from peripheral irrelevance through exotic novelty into the heart of mainstream rock. Throughout, Philo explores how and why British music from the period came to achieve such unprecedented heights of commercial, artistic, and cultural dominance. The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence will appeal to fans, students and scholars of popular music history—indeed anyone interested in understanding the fascinating relationship between popular music and culture.
    • British urban trees: A social and cultural history, 1800-1914

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (White Horse Press, 2016)
      Whether we consider the great London Planes which are now the largest trees in many British urban streets, the exotic ornamentals from across the globe flourishing in numerous private gardens, the stately trees of public parks and squares or the dense colourful foliage of suburbia, the impact of trees and arboriculture upon modern towns and their ecosystems is clear. From the formal walks and squares of the Georgian town to Victorian tree-lined boulevards and commemorative oaks, trees are the organic statuary of modern urban society, providing continuity yet constantly changing through the day and over the seasons. Interfacing between humans and nature, connecting the continents and reaching back and forward through time to past and future generations, they have come to define urbanity while simultaneously evoking nature and the countryside. This book is the first major study of British urban arboriculture between 1800 and 1914 and draws upon fresh approaches in geographical, urban and environmental history. It makes a major contribution to our understanding of where, how and why trees grew in British towns in the period, the social and cultural impact of these and the attitudes taken towards them. CONTENTS Chapter One. Private Urban Garden Trees Chapter Two. Trees in Public Parks and Gardens Chapter Three. Trees in the Victorian Cemetery Chapter Four. Trees in Victorian Nottingham c. 1840–1880 Chapter Five. Victorian and Edwardian Glasgow Chapter Six. Towards a National Capital: Cardiff Chapter Seven. Urban Trees and Smoke Pollution Chapter Eight. Trees for Heath and Pleasure: Spa and Resort Towns
    • Bruno Schulz.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Boiler House Press, 2018-07)
      A creative non-fiction memoir of a lost friend who introduced me to Bruno Schulz. This is a chapter in a pro-EU anthology which was published on the anniversary of Brexit in response to surges of violent British nationalism and political paranoia. Edited by JT Welsch and Ágnes Lehóczky the anthology marks the vital contribution of non-UK-born writers to the UK's poetry culture. Wretched Strangers brings together innovative writing from around the globe, celebrating the irreducible diversity such work brings to ‘British’ poetry. While documenting the challenges faced by writers from elsewhere, these pieces offer hopeful re-conceptions of ‘shared foreignness’ as Lila Matsumoto describes it, and the ‘peculiar state of exiled human,’ in Fawzi Karim’s words.
    • Burning Worm

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2001)
      a novel
    • 'But now we float': Cowper, air-balloons, and the poetics of flight

      Lafford, Erin; University of Oxford (The Cowper and Newton Museum, 2018-06)
    • A cage for the muse and the limits of invention

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2016)
      This paper explores the notion that creativity in the arts, particularly music, benefits from constraints. Expressive freedom is often fostered within education to encourage the pursuit of artistic individualism, but straying too far from stylistic norms can often engender incoherence. This paper does not challenge the breaking of rules that define a style nor does it denigrate the benefits that may arise from conflicting ideas and unusual combinations, but explores the virtue and benefits of boundaries and suggests that freedom, from a creative perspective, is often an illusory construct; strong creative identities are achievable through and often defined by creative constraints. Conclusions focus on the potential profits of constraints that bind expressive ideas and the function and virtue of intuition within the creative process; theorizing upon whether creative confinement, or the awareness thereof, is ultimately a liberating or inhibiting experience. We determine that artistic creative freedom as a concept may indeed be illusory, but the perception of freedom for some is a necessary ingredient in the creative act.
    • Can’t spell, can’t teach? An exploration of stakeholder attitudes towards those with dyslexia, training to be primary classroom teachers

      Charles, Sarah; University of Derby (2017-05-12)
      Aim: This paper seeks to investigate whether the dominance of a standards drive approach to ITE, and the teaching profession, has perpetuated attitudinal barriers to the recruitment and employment of students with dyslexia. Stakeholder understanding of the term dyslexia; perceived strengths/challenges those with dyslexia bring to the profession; what constitutes as reasonable adjustments and employability prospects, based on disclosure, are explored. Content: The presentation will disseminate and discuss key findings related to ITE stakeholder attitudes towards those with dyslexia, training to be primary teachers on ITE programmes. Findings suggest that there remains uncertainty and confusion about dyslexia, its associated characteristics/causes. Many stakeholders perceive dyslexia negatively, couched in deficits rather than difference. This research found strengths such as empathy, inclusive practice and ease of identification of children with dyslexia are attributed to those training to teach with dyslexia. Stakeholder concerns, of those entering the profession, with dyslexia, are identified as being– ability to cope with the demands of the profession; the inability to teach particular age groups/subjects; the level of support needed to ensure success and retention following qualification. This latter concern constitutes a key finding of this research, as the level of support afforded by universities is perceived as being unrealistic in the workplace. The notion of what constitutes ‘reasonable adjustments’ is questioned by many ITE stakeholders. A number of ‘reasonable adjustments’ are perceived by stakeholders as being unreasonable within the teaching profession due to the professional roles, responsibilities and requirements of being a teaching professional. Furthermore, uncertainty exists as to how schools can actually support those with dyslexia, in light of professional standards. A significant majority of stakeholders demonstrated a negative attitude towards the notion of people with dyslexia entering the teaching profession, believing that parents should be concerned if their child is being taught by someone with dyslexia. Both of these findings could have serious implications on the future disclosure of those with dyslexia. This research has found that a fear of stigmatisation and potential discrimination, which deter those with dyslexia from disclosing on course and job applications are justified and real. This research concludes that employability chances are lessened upon disclosure of dyslexia. This presentation will seek to engage the audience to consider their own understanding of dyslexia; their institutional policies regarding disclosure, support and training in light of equality legislation and, ultimately, their own attitudes towards the suitability of those with dyslexia studying on, ITE programmes. Thinking deeply about teacher education: This is a thought provoking presentation which encourages the audience to think carefully about those with dyslexia on ITE programmes, and the potential professional, legal, ethical and moral tensions due to concerns that; “The drive for high literacy standards will be compromised if teachers with ‘weaker’ literacy standards are employed” (Riddick, 2003, p.390). The country/ies to which the presentation relates: This presentation has scope and relevance to all countries where there is incidence of dyslexia and where students are required to meet professional standards to enter the teaching profession.
    • Care + attend.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (Society of Artistic Research, 2015-02)
      Care + Attend comprises a constellation of fragments and extracts - of different intensities and durations - where the exposition of research emerges as poetic and performative, generating moments of potential resonance and dialogue. We explore the theme Unconditional Love through the principles (perhaps even methodologies) of care and attention, as applied within specific (artistic) practices of both the everyday and of the self. Beginning with the observation that both curate and curiosity have shared etymology in the term ‘care’, Care + Attend seeks to develop a research vocabulary based on receptivity, openness, fidelity, integrity, intimacy, friendship and commitment (whilst not ignoring the parallel principles of distraction, inattention, the act of closing one’s eyes or of looking away). Cocker and Lee have invited a range of artists & writers to share and reflect on their own processes, philosophies and politics of care and attention, and to present these through live performance, screenings and spoken word. Contributors include Kate Briggs, Daniela Cascella, Belén Cerezo, Emma Cocker, Steve Dutton + Neil Webb, Victoria Gray, Rob Flint, Mark Leahy, Joanne Lee, Martin Lewis, Sarat Maharaj, Brigid McLeer, Hester Reeve, and Lisa Watts [Society for Artistic Research website].
    • Care of the person with dementia : interprofessional practice and education

      Forman, Dawn; Pond, Dimity; University of Derby; Newcastle University Australia (Cambridge University Press, 2015-11)
      Care of the Person with Dementia responds to the urgent need for health practitioners to take an innovative approach to the challenge of dementia. The first Australian text of its kind, it combines evidence-based resources with interprofessional education and practice, exploring the ethical, social and environmental repercussions of dementia to provide a comprehensive overview of dementia care in an Australian context. The text is structured around a model of interprofessional education and practice (IPE) tailored to dementia care. This model incorporates the context of care, an important element missing from other recognised models of IPE. Throughout the book, principles of IPE are explained within the context of dementia, drawing on exemplars from a body of current, well-researched and evaluated dementia practice. Written by experienced academics, and providing national and international perspectives, this is a unique and crucial resource to develop collaborative skills and professional knowledge in the management of dementia.