• Techniques to encourage early and frequent writing.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (The Professional and Higher Partnership, 2017-06-19)
      As the result of recent changes in the research landscape, researchers are now commonly required to do more than just research. For example, they are often expected to take responsibility for post-research activities, including engagement with government, business, and the public. To meet these expectations, an array of skills is required, including communication, networking, leadership, and the management of stakeholders. The need to develop such skills in researchers presents a challenge to those responsible for their development. These include researcher developers, principal investigators, research supervisors, staff developers, careers professionals, research office staff, and research centre managers. These developers face additional demands from the need to help researchers develop their careers and employability. 53 solutions, each tested in practice, for meeting these challenges are presented here, accompanied by practical advice on their implementation and the potential pitfalls involved.This book's 45 contributors provide practical strategies, drawn from experience across several continents, to enhance the practices and policies of researcher development. Designed for dipping into, the book enables researcher developers, supervisors and academic developers to: enrich their approaches; innovate to enhance and embed educational value; and do more with limited resources.
    • Telephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

      Gilbody, Simon; Brabyn, Sally; Lovell, Karina; Kessler, David; Devlin, Thomas; Smith, Lucy; Araya, Ricardo; Barkham, Michael; Bower, Peter; Cooper, Cindy; et al. (Cambridge University Press, 2018-01-02)
      Background Computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials. Aims We tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT. Method We compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months. Results Use of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5–3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI –0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints. Conclusions Telephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.
    • Television dramas as memory screens

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2011)
      Abstract: Within this article I am focus upon the construction of both social and personal memories within the television drama, drawing upon Landsberg’s notion of prosthetic memory and King’s identification of ‘afterwardsness’ as ways of comprehending the construction of memory and the past within texts. The examples are The Long Walk to Finchley (Tony Saint, BBC 4, 2008) and Life on Mars (2007-8). Both dramas share a number of concerns yet each has a very different context within British television. The relationship between viewers’ adopting memories from the dramas and incorporating these into their own sets of memories, including my own memories of the dramas is considered. Equally, the negotiation of the media and public discourses as memory screens with which we interact is a primary concern.
    • The “Three Ps” (perfecting, professionalization, and pragmatism) and their limitations for understanding Cuban education in the 1970s

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Rowman & Littlefield, 24/08/2018)
      This book provides, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the 1970s which challenges prevailing interpretations. Drawing from multidisciplinary perspectives and exploring a range of areas--including politics, international relations, culture, education, and healthcare--its contributing authors demonstrate that the decade was a time of intense transformation which proved pivotal to the development of the Revolution. Indeed, many of the ideas, approaches, policies, and legislation developed and tested during the 1970s maintain a very visible legacy in contemporary Cuba. In highlighting the complexity of the 1970s, this volume ultimately aims to contribute to a greater understanding of the Cuban Revolution and how it chooses to face the challenges of the twenty-first century.
    • Theory on theory.

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2017-07-19)
      Key debates in the domain of ‘Theory on Theory’ have this year focused upon the legacies of the theorists grouped together under the name ‘poststructuralism’, often drawing on material made available in recent decades by Barthes, Foucault and Deleuze which adds new facets to critical understanding of their work. Reflecting on their contributions, it appears that individual theorists can illuminate or extend each other’s oeuvres: Foucault in particular has attracted considerable attention in this vein in 2016, with books appearing which respectively place his ideas alongside those of Marx, Derrida and Deleuze. His lectures on ‘governmentality’, meanwhile, have prompted some to claim that his account of neoliberalism therein demonstrated a ‘quiet appreciation’ of it (Peter Fleming, The Mythology of Work: How Capitalism Persists Despite Itself (Pluto Press [2015]), p. 45). Turning to Barthes, we find re-evaluations...
    • Theory on theory.

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2016-05-19)
      Theory on Theory' names a body of work which investigates the inheritances of theory and suggests future directions. As David Winters has observed in a previous edition, writing of this kind has been associated with declarations of the'death of theory' (YWCCT 22:i[2014] 2), the contention that we exist 'after' it. On the contrary: theory continues to mutate. This chapter will focus upon work published in 2015; the variety of topics covered attests to the growing range of theoretical concerns. There have been re-evaluations of the work of major figures in the field: a new journal focusing on the work of Roland Barthes, accompanied by a feast of newly-translated material written by him, prompts a consideration of his legacy and its significance for future work; studies of the relationships between the ideas of Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno, and of Lacan and Marx, add new insights to the existing scholarship on these thinkers and demonstrate the ways in which they can continue to illuminate theoretical debate. Books drawing on a range of theoretical and philosophical sources have also appeared on the nature of literature, the recent development of interest in the 'nonhuman', and the 'horror of philosophy'.
    • ‘They get a qualification at the end of it, I think’: incidental workplace learning and technical education in England

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby; College of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-10-20)
      Workplace learning is increasingly central to the international lifelong learning agenda but has made limited contributions to full-time vocational education in England during the last 30 years. A more central role is envisaged within the technical education proposed by the 2016 Sainsbury Review and Post-16 Skills Plan, with access to work placements dominating discussion of policy implementation. A multicase study of workplace learning among post-16 students in England on current ‘study programmes’ was mapped to four of the technical routes designated by the Sainsbury Review and Skills Plan, using documentary, observation and interview data. The study drew on theorisation of the workplace as the site of situated or incidental learning, whilst noting that its opportunities are differentially allocated according to organisational or personal differences, in ways that have particular implications for young people on placements. Whilst access to more advanced learning opportunities was secured through planned, collaborative approaches, reliance on incidental learning offered more routinised experiences to students less prepared for autonomous learning. The study indicates that questions of access, knowledge and pedagogy remain to be addressed if plans for ‘technical education’ in England are to provide meaningful learning opportunities and support transitions to fulfilling work.
    • 'They got to go': SKA versus America

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014-01)
      Dynamics of Interconnections in Popular Culture(s) is an eclectic and free-ranging collection of articles grounded in a combination of the social sciences with the populist humanities. The collection is further unified by an approach that considers changes and linkages within and between cultural systems as evidenced through their respective popular cultures. The key underlying assumption is that our collective popular expressions create an arena of global cultural exchange, further precipitating new cultural adaptations, expressions, and connections. The volume is divided into two sections. The first consists of articles investigating theoretical and methodological approaches to the dynamics of history and cultural changes. These include cultural anthropology, history, economics, and sociology. The second section is made up of explorations into a myriad of cultural practices and expressions that exemplify not only the wide diversity of popular cultures and their workings, but also the interconnections between and within those cultural systems. A wide variety of specific case studies are presented to evidence and support the more general points made in the previous section. The collection demonstrates that the everyday lives of ordinary people, while varying from culture to culture, are unified through their expressions of shared humanity.
    • 'They've got their backs to the sea': Careers Work in Kent's coastal schools

      Shepherd, Claire; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-02)
      Kent's coastal schools are a highly diverse group of institutions which serve a range of different communities. In a literal sense the young people of Kent have got their backs to the sea. Despite their relative proximity to the economic heartland of England, they remain separated by distance and geography. Many of the challenging issues that have been identified for young people in coastal towns are strongly related to their careers. Career describes the individual’s progression through life, learning and work. Individual’s careers are profoundly influenced by the context within which they pursue them. But, context does not wholly define your career. With the right information, support and education people can make the most out of their circumstances, seize the opportunities around them and change, improve or leave their immediate environment. Career guidance describes a range of educational interventions that are designed to help people to realise their potential and make the most of their career.
    • Thirteen

      Shore, Tim; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (10/09/2016)
      Thirteen interrogates the history and significance of 27/28 Queen Street, Derby, a now derelict building that was once the home of John Flamsteed (1646-1719), the first Astronomer Royal. A series of works, including a digital animation, gifs, digital prints and an artist’s book. The work will be exhibited at the Wirksworth Festival 2016 and also at Derby Cathedral. The publication will include commissioned essays that consider the themes of Thirteen from range of disciplines, it will be published by QUAD. Before moving south to Greenwich in 1675, Flamsteed compiled a ‘great catalogue of the stars’ from a series of observations all based on a Derby Meridian that ran through the back garden of his Derby home. The place from where the position of every other place – on Earth, and in the Heavens - was determined was in his back garden in Derby. Thirteen considers the resonance of Derby having shifted from being the centre or beginning of the world, to being 5 minutes 54.6 seconds behind. Thirteen was commissioned by D-LAB Digital Art in Derbyshire and supported by a University of Derby College of Arts Research grant. Digital animation by Tim Shore. Sound by Michael Brown.
    • This Time and Now: identity & belonging in the Irish Diaspora: the Irish in Britain and second generational silence

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Rodopi Press, 2012)
      The Irish in Britain have only recently been granted ethnic status. This blind spot which existed towards the Irish community, even as highly visible negative assumptions about the Irish circulated, resulted in a strange invisibility which simultaneously derided as it denied Irish identity, and failed to acknowledge the Irish as an ethnic group. This has effected how the generation born from the 1950’s/60’s migration into England can both consider and describe their notion of identity. Silence, denial and over identification reveal how the sense of non belonging, or ‘otherness’ is a common touch stone, and identification as a constant outsider is a prominent note. Criticisms of national identity levelled against the second generation from within the community reveal attitudes about ownership of a ‘nationhood’ which is still contested ground. Identity displayed through those visible traditions which are frequently stronger in displaced communities can not be taken as the sole markers of national belonging as memories, silences and post memories impact on such constantly evolving groups as are created by emigration. Historic patterns and beliefs which are traceable through the images, stories and customs which were originally brought over create an image bank with which the generation born in England might consider and negotiate its relationship to nation and home. This paper asks whether the models this generation grew up with, and which have begun the journey from lived experience into literature and into folklore, can still have a relevant social function when we consider the idea of identity and belonging?
    • Tibet in the Western Imagination

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
      Neuhaus explores the roots of the long-standing European fascination with Tibet, from the Dalai Lama to the Abominable Snowman. Surveying a wide range of travel accounts, official documents, correspondence and fiction, he examines how different people thought about both Tibet and their home cultures.
    • Tickled pink.

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2017-03)
      Research into small publishing projects. Exploration of current market competition in illustrated publications and zines. An extensive investigation into risograph printing process in order to create limited edition publication.
    • Time tides: An exploration of dynamic loop-based performance diffused in a multi-channel environment.

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Sounds in Space Symposium, 27/06/2017)
      This performance at Sounds in Space Symposium (University of Derby) by the audio-visual duo, Time.lus, explores (through live interaction) the dynamic dialogue between rhythmic, audio-visual materials in space. Original source material is presented then deconstructed and improvisationally reimagined in real-time, to create synchronous / asynchronous rhythms and textures. The work is evolved through the use of audio-visual effects and dynamic processors.
    • A time to grieve: Women, mourning and remembrance in the Irish diaspora community.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Edge Publishing, 2017)
      From the private to the public. Social attitudes to bereavement and the expression of grief relating to female public expression in the Irish Diasporic community in England. A writer considers personal experience in its social context and examines attitudes to behaviours and expressions of grief both past and present which allow the establishment of a female voice and presence.
    • Tissue-conducted spatial sound fields

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Institute of Acoustics, 14/10/2014)
      We describe experiments using multiple cranial transducers to achieve auditory spatial perceptual impressions via bone (BC) and tissue conduction (TC), bypassing the peripheral hearing apparatus. This could be useful in cases of peripheral hearing damage or where ear-occlusion is undesirable. Previous work (e.g. Stanley and Walker 2006, MacDonald and Letowski 2006)1,2 indicated robust lateralization is feasible via tissue conduction. We have utilized discrete signals, stereo and first order ambisonics to investigate control of externalization, range, direction in azimuth and elevation, movement and spaciousness. Early results indicate robust and coherent effects. Current technological implementations are presented and potential development paths discussed.
    • To the Ladies Turbutt: Three women, three wills and three legacies.

      Flint, Alison Claire; University of Derby (Women's History Network, 2016-09)
      The paper demonstrates that three women from one Derbyshire Gentry family, the Turbutt family through wills and legacies influenced, shaped and controlled the matrilineal line for well over two hundred years. From paper and ink to text and the digital screen the consequences of their decisions reverberate into the twenty-first century. A judicious evaluation of the archival collection of the Turbutt family indicated that this group of records would yield rather more than a regular male oriented family pedigree. The paper argues that through bequests in both life and death the three women had agency to help, guide and empower. It explores the choices made by later generations of the same family that society would otherwise have prohibited; in these choices the women would not only enrage their close male relatives but also later generations of the familial patrilineal line. The paper explores how the platform of letters enabled/allowed women to step out of the hegemonic ideal of domesticity and into a world outside the gates of the landed estate. It will see how legacies and letters afforded two women to play the nineteenth-century stock market, and furthermore, it demonstrates the difference a century made in the nature of the financial subjects about which the Ogston women were writing to determine what and whom was of greatest concern.
    • Towards being a "Good Cuban": socialist citizenship education in a globalized context.

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Springer, 21/10/2016)
      Considering the renewed diplomatic relations with the United States and to a globalized world, the Cuban State is forming global citizens while trying to retain socialist values in the face of increased market liberalization. Since the revolutionary period (1960s), Cuban education has stressed the intersecting values of fervent, resistant patriotism, hard work and active, solidary internationalism, as integral parts of the New Socialist Man/Woman or the “buen revolucionario” (good revolutionary). In this new economic, political and social context the Cuban government, its school system, and parents are challenged with preserving socialism and its accompanying values while preparing its young people for work and life in an evolving society and globalized world. Drawing on school textbooks and a wide range of interviews with young Cubans conducted by three education researchers, between 2011 and 2014, this chapter examines Cuban young people’s struggle to reconcile the contradictions and tensions between these ideals and the pragmatic reality of life, implying the need for new forms of national, international, global citizenship. Cuban youth are demanding a larger role in shaping their society if the government wants to keep them on the island. Consequently, the development of the buen revolucionario is taking on new meaning in the twenty-first century globalized world.
    • La tradición de la organización comunitaria y la participación social en un preescolar de la Ciudad de México

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; González Peral, Adriana; Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México (El Colegio de SonoraJuan Pablo Editor, 2015)
    • Training Needs Analysis

      Moore, Nicki; Osmani, Argjend; Teched Consulting Services, Ltd.; University of Derby (European Union Office in Kosovo, 2015)
      The training needs analysis was conducted beteeen February and April 2015 for the EU funded project: ICT in Education in Kosovo. The processes required to perform the traning needs analysis have been.  The design of a framework of competences;  The identification of target groups;  The creation and implementation of an online survey to assess the competence of education sector personnel against the competences contained in the framework;  The collation, preparation and analysis of the survey data; and  Reporting the research findings.