• Black libraries

      Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (Candlelight Records, 2015-10)
      Taken from the debut album 'The Calendrical Cycle: Eye of Earth' out now on Candlelight Records.
    • Blasphemy and politics in romantic literature: Creativity in the writing of Percy Bysshe Shelley

      Whickman, Paul; University of Derby (Springer International Publishing, 2020-06-07)
      This book argues for the importance of blasphemy in shaping the literature and readership of Percy Bysshe Shelley and of the Romantic period more broadly. Not only are perceptions of blasphemy taken to be inextricable from politics, this book also argues for blasphemous ‘irreverence’ as both inspiring and necessitating new poetic creativity. The book reveals the intersection of blasphemy, censorship and literary property throughout the ‘Long Eighteenth Century’, attesting to the effect of this connection on Shelley’s poetry more specifically. Paul Whickman notes how Shelley’s perceived blasphemy determined the nature and readership of his published works through censorship and literary piracy. Simultaneously, Whickman crucially shows that aesthetics, content and the printed form of the physical text are interconnected and that Shelley’s political and philosophical views manifest themselves in his writing both formally and thematically.
    • BlindSpot: a site-specific film installation at the Workhouse, Southwell (National Trust) for New Expressions 3 (New Opportunities Award)

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2015-07)
      The site-specific installation captures the passing of time, tracing the patterns of sunlight and shadow cast by the iron window frames of the building across the floors of the empty dormitories. The Rev. J.T. Becher, the founder of the Workhouse said that ‘An empty workhouse is a successful one’ and the film plays with nothingness and emptiness - the absence of the people the building was designed to hold - and the slow passing of light and time which recalls the lives of the inmates and people who have lived and worked at the Workhouse.
    • The body as instrument: tissue conducted multimodal audio-tactile spatial music.

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (25/08/2017)
      We describe early progress in exploring the compositional potential for multimodal music of a multi-transducer audio-plus-vibrotactile apparatus, utilising ambisonics encoding; the tactile component is an incidental by-product, carried by the same transducers. An elicitation exercise with one hundred uninstructed listeners who gave responses in their own words was conducted and responses were transcribed and aggregated to identify emergent descriptive themes. The tactile components of the stimuli assume greater importance in the perceptual experience than originally considered, suggesting compositional opportunities in utilizing additive effects of audio-plus-tactile signals. This could engender assistive technologies for those with some degree of conductive hearing loss, ameliorating music-deprivation and addressing quality-of-life (QoL) issues.
    • Bonfire of the inanities

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (30/09/2010)
      Times are hard and cuts have to be made, so let’s start by putting an end to verbosity and all those mind-bogglingly long assignments, research papers and reports,writes Peter Lennox, succinctly
    • Book Review: Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity: confronting the fear of knowledge, by Joanna Williams

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-04-04)
      Book Review
    • The boy who cried wolf [Arabic edition]

      Jenkins, Saffy; Broadley, Leo; University of Derby (Harper Collins (Big Cat), 01/08/2016)
      Collins Arabic Big Cat is a guided reading series for ages 3 to 11. The series is structured with reference to the learning progression of Arabic at nursery and primary schools researched especially for Collins. This carefully graded approach allows children to build up their reading knowledge of Arabic step by step. Level 5 books are for children who are ready to read stories with more challenging word patterns or non-verbal sentences with 2 or 3 words, and with total support through illustrations and extensive use of repetition. Double spacing is used between words to ensure children see where each new word in a sentence begins and ends to ensure the focus remains on reading core words. A shepherd boy decides to play a trick on the people in his village by telling them that there is a wolf nearby. But will the villagers believe him when a wolf really does turn up? This witty retelling of the traditional story was written by Saffy Jenkins.
    • Brain activity and mental workload associated with artistic practice

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; Wilson, Max; Maior, Horia; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 09/02/2018)
      We present the first stage of our on-going artist-driven BCI collaboration, where we equipped an artist with the brain scanning technique functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative practice. We artists are interested in exposing the hidden cognitive processes involved in our creative practice, in order to reuse or integrate the data into our performances. The computer science researchers are interested in collecting unstructured ‘in the wild’ fNIRS data, and to see how the artists interpret the data retrospectively. We highlight some interesting early examples from the data and describe our on-going plans. We will have completed a second data collection before the workshop.
    • Brecht in pidgin: Oladipo Agboluaje's mother courage in Africa

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (African Theatre Association, 2018)
      African British performances and dramas mutually share their collective interest in the tempestuous afterlife of colonialism and post-independence and the different vibrations they carry into the present but in Africa’s performance forms and the various cultural ‘beats’. Regardless of their routes to Europe, Africans living in new national spaces of the diaspora yearn for Africa; hence, African British performances that emerge are caught between the longing to present Africa, which they left behind or one that is fading in their memories, and the diaspora with its pervasive pitiless demands. The interpretation of African British plays demands a more nuanced appreciation not only because of the multi-stranded and multi-voiced identities, but because they share a collective interest in the complex ‘afterlife’ following political independence of Africa from the colonialists to the present. Oladipo Agboluaje’s Mother Courage demonstrates that theatrical presentation, informed by the African British playwrights’ identification with the African continent reproduce local, transnational and/or trans-border dimensions. The essay traces the dialogue between Agboluaje’s adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Brecht’s original text, focusing on how the African playwright’s travel between different ‘worlds’, across borders develops into a new web of ideas, characters, and words.
    • The brick eater

      Broadley, Leo; University of Derby (2016-03)
      Illustrated 32 x Picture Book for 4-7 year olds related to issues of the current global obesity epidemic in children. The metaphor for food as a brick, with a central non-human character is the USP of this work. The text is a non-rhyming text that can be translated into world languages and avoids issues of ‘self-loathing’ in children. This simply means that works about obesity should not refer to fatness, or physical size as a measure of obesity as this can lead to identification and victimisation of individuals in class. Current medical research points to the idea that children and adults may be ‘fat on the inside’ and that no obese child in the class should be made to feel that they are identified (by peers) in relation to the story, and that actual health refers to access to balanced diet, enough sleep, physical fitness as well as good nutrition.
    • bricolage, poetics, spacing

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2017-11-28)
      Contemporary concern for bricolage both transcends and supersedes de Certeau’s important intervention that resituated the term as actions undertaken in everyday life. In particular, he engaged the notion of bricolage in ways that presented tactics, evasions, resistances, ruses and even tricks in his consideration of everyday life as practiced. Whilst these considerations may be read, as indeed he asserted, as ‘making do’, there are further possibilities of this term. For example, bricolage may be considered to ‘occur’. In this we may take the anthropologist Hallam and Ingold’s grasp of creativity as something in our bodily and mental response to situations, calm, anxious and otherwise; responding to the detail of a situation, a required or desired action.
    • Brides and widows: Iconic dress and identity in Howard Barker’s costumes

      Kipp, Lara Maleen; University of Derby (Intellect, 01/06/2017)
      One of the strongest recurring motifs in the work of contemporary British playwright Howard Barker is women’s marital status: brides and widows abound in his work. Their status as such is often crucially configured, but also subverted through their costumes (in a Western cultural context). This paper considers the central role that brides and widows play in a variety of Barker’s dramatic texts and identifies some core working principles with regard to his use of costume. It explores the notion of the iconic garment (cf. Hannah 2014) and its influence on these characters’ identities. Drawing on aesthetic discourse, in particular that of the sublime, I analyse how Barker proposes a reconsideration of stable subject identity through these recognisable, yet ambiguous and unstable female figures.
    • 'Bridging' the gap between VET and higher education: permeability or perpetuation?

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (VETNET, 2019-09-22)
      Demands for admission to higher education from vocational routes are widespread across Eu-rope but take different forms, depending on the recognition of tertiary VET or whether sharp-er distinctions between VET and higher education exist. In England, alongside policies pro-moting more employer-responsive tertiary provision, opportunities for ‘bridging’ from voca-tional routes to general university education, and vice versa, have been discussed. The study reported here examined four cases of existing provision supporting transitions into higher edu-cation, potential sites of practices supporting bridging across pathways. Each case provided valued support for progression to higher levels of study; yet these practices focused on exist-ing routes rather than transitions between more academic or vocationally-oriented sites. It is suggested, therefore, that the explicit denotation of separate tertiary provision may be more likely to constrain ‘bridging’ provision than for the latter to help students move beyond their existing route into substantially different forms of higher education.
    • The British Espernatist 10.

      Bareham, Paul; Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Spirit Duplicator, 2018)
    • British invasion: The crosscurrents of musical influence

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014-11)
      Before The Beatles landed on American shores in February 1964 only two British acts had topped the Billboard singles chart. In the first quarter of 1964, however, the Beatles alone accounted for sixty percent of all recorded music sold in the United States; in 1964 and 1965 British acts occupied the number one position for 52 of the 104 weeks; and from 1964 through to 1970, the Rolling Stones, Herman’s Hermits, the Dave Clark Five, the Animals, the Kinks, the Hollies, the Yardbirds and the Who placed more than one hundred and thirty songs on the American Top Forty. In The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence, Simon Philo illustrates how this remarkable event in cultural history disrupted and even reversed pop culture’s flow of influence, goods, and ideas—orchestrating a dramatic turn-around in the commercial fortunes of British pop in North America that turned the 1960s into “The Sixties.” Focusing on key works and performers, The British Invasion tracks the journey of this musical phenomenon from peripheral irrelevance through exotic novelty into the heart of mainstream rock. Throughout, Philo explores how and why British music from the period came to achieve such unprecedented heights of commercial, artistic, and cultural dominance. The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence will appeal to fans, students and scholars of popular music history—indeed anyone interested in understanding the fascinating relationship between popular music and culture.
    • British urban trees: A social and cultural history, 1800-1914

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (White Horse Press, 2016)
      Whether we consider the great London Planes which are now the largest trees in many British urban streets, the exotic ornamentals from across the globe flourishing in numerous private gardens, the stately trees of public parks and squares or the dense colourful foliage of suburbia, the impact of trees and arboriculture upon modern towns and their ecosystems is clear. From the formal walks and squares of the Georgian town to Victorian tree-lined boulevards and commemorative oaks, trees are the organic statuary of modern urban society, providing continuity yet constantly changing through the day and over the seasons. Interfacing between humans and nature, connecting the continents and reaching back and forward through time to past and future generations, they have come to define urbanity while simultaneously evoking nature and the countryside. This book is the first major study of British urban arboriculture between 1800 and 1914 and draws upon fresh approaches in geographical, urban and environmental history. It makes a major contribution to our understanding of where, how and why trees grew in British towns in the period, the social and cultural impact of these and the attitudes taken towards them. CONTENTS Chapter One. Private Urban Garden Trees Chapter Two. Trees in Public Parks and Gardens Chapter Three. Trees in the Victorian Cemetery Chapter Four. Trees in Victorian Nottingham c. 1840–1880 Chapter Five. Victorian and Edwardian Glasgow Chapter Six. Towards a National Capital: Cardiff Chapter Seven. Urban Trees and Smoke Pollution Chapter Eight. Trees for Heath and Pleasure: Spa and Resort Towns
    • Bruno Schulz.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Boiler House Press, 2018-07)
      A creative non-fiction memoir of a lost friend who introduced me to Bruno Schulz. This is a chapter in a pro-EU anthology which was published on the anniversary of Brexit in response to surges of violent British nationalism and political paranoia. Edited by JT Welsch and Ágnes Lehóczky the anthology marks the vital contribution of non-UK-born writers to the UK's poetry culture. Wretched Strangers brings together innovative writing from around the globe, celebrating the irreducible diversity such work brings to ‘British’ poetry. While documenting the challenges faced by writers from elsewhere, these pieces offer hopeful re-conceptions of ‘shared foreignness’ as Lila Matsumoto describes it, and the ‘peculiar state of exiled human,’ in Fawzi Karim’s words.
    • Burning Worm

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2001)
      a novel