• The sister arts: Textile crafts between paint, print, and practice

      Gowrley, Freya; University of Derby (Wiley, 2020-02-05)
      This article explores intersections between portraiture, printed genre images, and conduct literature in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain, focusing on representations of needlework between these cultural forms. In extant scholarship, needlework has been characterised as an important site of debate, a discursive locus wherein the qualities of appropriate femininity were sketched out and redefined. This article centres on the very mechanisms by which this discourse operated, arguing that visual and literary images of needlework were central to the creation of a grammar of respectable femininity, a symbolic language that simultaneously advocated maternal instruction, domestic industry, and marital eligibility.
    • Skittish

      Watts, Lisa; Scott, Samara; University of Derby (The Tetley, 2014)
      Skittish researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Skittish is three exhibitions and is the first stage of two stages in this research. Each set of curators at each of the three galleries collaborated with me curate a sculptor alongside my art. The proposition was that all art forms of sculpture, video and performance, hold similar artistic concerns and artistic processes. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators and artists throughout the three exhibitions.
    • Skittish

      Watts, Lisa; May, Lucy; University of Derby (Spacex Gallery, 2013-10)
      Skittish researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Skittish is three exhibitions and is the first stage of two stages in this research. Each set of curators at each of the three galleries collaborated with me curate a sculptor alongside my art. The proposition was that all art forms of sculpture, video and performance, hold similar artistic concerns and artistic processes. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators, artists and myself throughout the three exhibitions.
    • Skittish

      Watts, Lisa; Kefford, David; University of Derby (Vane Gallery, 2013)
      Skittish researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Skittish is three exhibitions and is the first stage of two stages in this research. Each set of curators at each of the three galleries collaborated with me curate a sculptor alongside my art. The proposition was that all art forms of sculpture, video and performance, hold similar artistic concerns and artistic processes. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators and artists throughout the three exhibitions.
    • Socio-technical imaginary of the fourth industrial revolution and its implications for vocational education and training: a literature review

      Avis, James; University of Huddersfield (Informa UK Limited, 2018-08-21)
      This literature review engages with a diverse and sometimes contradictory body of work, employing an analytic stance rooted in policy scholarship. It discusses rhetorical constructions of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4th IR), locating these in understandings of the economy rooted in a neo-liberalism which rests upon a capitalist terrain. The 4th IR is an ideological construct which reflects specific material interests and has particular implications for education and training. The 4th IR’s association with digitalisation and artificial intelligence is ambivalent. For some writers, this leads to technological unemployment while for others, even though there is labour market disruption, there is no employment crisis that cannot be resolved. The strong connection between the 4th IR and labour market requirements is softened by those writers who adopt a qualitative analysis of advanced manufacturing work. These scholars suggest that the relationship between technology and skill is rather more complex than the protagonists of technological unemployment describe. Neo-Marxist writers develop a qualitatively different account of the current conjuncture to the imaginary of the 4th IR. In this instance, the analysis turns towards the elimination of labour from paid employment, together with the falling rate of profit and bypasses the former arguments. This review concludes by arguing that technology and artificial intelligence are entwined with social relations, being sites of class struggle. How this is played out is an outcome of the balance of power, not only within the social formation but also globally. How far the development of the forces of production is compatible with capitalist relations is a moot point, as this is also a site of struggle. The paper draws out the implications for VET and considers progressive educational responses. However, such a practice needs to be set within a broader politics that is committed to the development of a socially just society.
    • A sociolinguistic perspective on the (quasi-)modals of obligation and necessity in Australian English

      Penry Williams, Cara; Korhonen, Minna; University of Derby (CPW); La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia) (CPW); Macquarie University (New South W,ales Australia) (MK) (John Benjamins, 2020-11-09)
      This article examines the distribution and sociolinguistic patterning of (quasi-)modals which express strong obligation/necessity, namely must, have to, have got to, got to and need to, in Australian English. Variationist studies in other varieties of English have had contrasting findings in terms of distributions of root forms, as well as their conditioning by social and linguistic factors. The corpus analysis suggests real-time increased use of need to and decrease in have got to through comparison to earlier findings. The variationist analysis shows quasi-modals have to, have got to and got to as sensitive to speaker age and sex, and a recent increase of have to via apparent time modelling. Linguistic conditioning relating to the type of obligation and subject form is also found. The study contributes to sociolinguistic understanding of this large-scale change in English and the place of Australian English amongst other varieties.
    • Socrates for Teachers

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-04-04)
      This chapter introduces Plato’s Socrates and his philosophy. The nearest we can get to authentic Socratic thought is in Plato’s earlier dialogues where he presents the views of his tutor in powerful dramatic form. Socrates embodies in his life, and death, a commitment to freedom of speech that was not shared by the polis of Athens (or by most people today). Sections of Plato’s dramatic dialogues are presented at length to illustrate his life, his commitment to argument and to examining all beliefs however strongly held. Socrates embodies the critical spirit and the understanding that freedom of speech was the only way to knowledge. To convince anyone of the power of Socrates’ thinking and his moral example cannot be achieved through any introduction. The success of this chapter will be decided by those who go on to read the dialogues. If you stop here and pick up and read any of the Socratic dialogues, the Apology, the Crito, the Phaedo, the Protagoras, the Meno, or the Theaetetus then you will know the man without any intermediary other than Plato. The lesson of this chapter is: ‘always study the original texts’.
    • Solar patterning: The employment of fast and fugitive colorants via Anthotype, Cyanotype and other photographic techniques.

      Wells, Kate; Greger, Ness; University of Derby (Progress in Colour Studies (PICS), 2016-09)
      This paper discusses on-going research into natural dyes, mineral dyes (Lake pigments or raised colours) and leuco-vat dyes (Inko and SolarFast) with the potential to create a sustainable method of patterning fabric that employs the light sensitivity and fastness properties (fast or fugitive) of the colorants in creating a permanent (photographic) image in colour upon natural or re-generated fibre base.
    • Solaris - Lem/Tarkovsky/Soderbergh: adaptations in space

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Gylphi, 2013)
    • Sort of in Australian English: The elasticity of a pragmatic marker

      Mulder, Jean; Penry Williams, Cara; Moore, Erin E. F.; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (JM); La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia) (CPW); University of Derby (CPW); University of New South Wales, Canberra (A.C.T, Australia) (EEFM) (John Benjamins, 2019-05)
      This study examines the pragmatic functions of sort of in Australian English (AuE), utilising discourse from 12 months of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s television program Q&A. It explores the frequency of sort of uses in context with a focus on multifunctionality. Uses are classified in a data-based schema which synthesises the previously described pragmatic functions of sort of and locates these within Zhang’s (2015) Elastic Language framework. The article thus provides an understanding of the pragmatic functions of sort of in public discussion contexts within AuE, arguing, most notably, that sort of performs five of Zhang’s six functions, rather than just the two previously reported, and that in accounting for the complex uses of this pragmatic marker, a wider range of subtypes needs to be distinguished within two of the functions.
    • Sound Fountain

      Locke, Caroline (21/06/2010)
    • Spatialization and computer music

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2011-04)
      This article is about the possibility of a new kind of music; computer-managed signal processing offers unprecedented possibilities in the control of sound fields, and the promise of three-dimensional music is on the horizon. A paradigm shift is under way; as technological constraints are rolled back, so must conceptual constraints be reevaluated. Some of these are concerned with what spatiality actually is. This article asks if people had evolved without vision, how they would have ever had developed concepts of perfect forms such as triangles, exact circles, precise shapes, and completely straight lines. Auditory spatial perception tends to suffer in direct comparison with vision, but it may be that spatiality in audition is fundamentally different in several important respects. New musical metaphors can illuminate these, and the control possibilities offered by digital audio are at the forefront of these experiments.
    • Special educational needs and disabilities in early childhood education (Mexico).

      Reyes, Andrea Saldivar; Guzmán Zamora, Josué; Universidad de Tlaxcala (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019-01-02)
    • Special needs and disabilities in childhood (Mexico).

      Reyes, Andrea Saldivar; Guzmán Zamora, Josué; Universidad de Tlaxcala (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Staying creative: creative technique, habit and experience

      Wilson, Chris; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2016)
      This chapter focuses analysis on a practice-based research project exploring personal creativity in musical composition. Seeking simply to explore the process and experience of creative routines in a more focused way―most specifically through imposed constraints of discipline, productive time and working materials―the project developed in unexpected ways and the focused act of observation itself led to the development of unanticipated insights. Initial assumptions being that: 1) The right balance of challenge/constraint and creative context can stimulate creative fluency and flow, and; 2) The wrong balance of challenge/constraint and creative context can inhibit creativity, the subtle variations of experience and the delicate structures involved in framing ‘creative balance’ in the composition process developed insights into the relationship between creative boundaries, activities, and creative identity. Creative fluency and creative quality can, and routinely does, emerge from difficult and constrained creative conditions. This text presents a personal insight into the creative experience of working through a defined programme of compositional activity, deliberately designed to test and to challenge, and how the same parameters of creative activity can frame everything from the most positive and affirming of musical activity, to the most desperate and distressing. It is through both pain and pleasure that creative value can emerge.
    • A story to tell

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (2017)
      Thousands of refugees flee from worldwide conflict every day – they continue to arrive on the shores of Europe – but what can we do? A Story to Tell, through poetry, readings and responses to the refugees fleeing conflict, presents first-hand accounts of people who have stood on the shores of the Mediterranean, who have saved lives, who have worked in the Jungle in Calais – these testaments bear witness to the dilemmas of us all who want to do something. An evening of powerful, honest and uplifting accounts – truly inspiring. This is the second piece that Ava has created with Amnesty, the first resulting in Acting Alone which has toured nationally and internationally to sell out performances and critical acclaim: “compelling” John Godber “Acting Alone .. ambitious and provoking” Buxton Fringe “accomplished theatre maker” Theatre Guru
    • Strange days: might as well face it you're addicted

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Cambria Press, 2012)
    • Strange meetings: Moments of recognition and identification in short stories.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (International Conference on the Short Story., 2017)
      In examining how both reader and writer interpret the ‘new’ through their previous understandings this questions how we use those recognition. Do we reinforce the idea of the self & the familiar or do we challenge this familiarity and reconsider how we approach the ‘other’ in our reading and authorship as writers? In re positioning the other we can consider both Orientalism and the different in western short fictions and early short tales as a reflection of the observer rather than the observed.
    • Stratified realities: convergence and mediation in non-fiction collage film.

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (07/09/2018)
      Positivist thinking has been highly influential on the development of documentary film in the English-speaking world. Brian Winston (1995) argues that this is explained by the perception of the camera as a scientific instrument that provides the facility to deliver an unmediated reality intact to the viewer. This conceit has been central to documentary production in the English speaking cannon, underpinning the truth claims of direct cinema and its observational, objective ethos. In contrast, Documentary filmmakers such as Adam Curtis and Joshua Oppenheimer, working within strategies that openly embrace the synthesis of documentary with experimental and fictional practice, have suggested that the language of non-fiction must develop new tools for adequately addressing the heterogeneity and plurality of the social world. This implies that the complexity of unequal relations determining social forces cannot be adequately described by conventional documentary representation, particularly those conventions tied to tenets of objectivity and balance. The research aims to address this need by developing non-fictional collage as a method for interrogating the mechanisms that shape the social world. The project’s practical methodology emphasises fabrication, simultaneity and layering as tools with the potential to extend the vocabulary of documentary film. The paper will present a body of practice research that explores the intersection of collage, found footage film, animation, documentary and critical realism. The practice investigates digital compositing, hybridity and the capacity for spatial layering to generate an intermediate, unstable aesthetic that cannot be assigned to any singular, unitary ontological level. The paper argues that these conditions provoke an elasticity and ambiguity that dissolves binary distinctions between mimesis and abstraction, reflecting the non-dualist standpoint of critical realism at a medial point between positivist and idealist perspectives. The research deploys the particular constructedness and intermediality of collage as a disruption to ideologically conditioned appearance forms. This posits the practice as a challenge to reductive accounts of the socio-historical world in dominant visual cultures under capitalism. The paper claims that in contrast to unmediated live action images, the hybridity of collage has the potential to more adequately describe the complexity and contingency of reality. The paper explores the layered composite of colliding images as the locus of collage as political discourse. This lies in its facility to surpass the limitations of the monovalent image through the dialectical tension of simultaneity and coexistence. The capacity of collage to describe the interdependence and complexity of socio-historical phenomena is underpinned by the critical realist concept of stratified reality, an idea that advances an ontology comprised of co-dependent structures and mechanisms. The project draws from theoretical debates in experimental and animated documentary that assert the legitimacy of explicit construction and fabrication in non-fictional address. The paper argues that the persistence of collage lies in its continuing relevance as a process of working through and negotiating the complexity of an increasing interconnected and disorientating world.