• Report on a medium-scale three dimensional artificial soundscape rendition: research and development system

      Lennox, Peter; University of York (UK and Ireland Soundscape Community, 2002-11)
      A geodesic dome housing a 32Xspeaker <3rd order ambisonic system for Sound Art experimentation at the 2002 Maxis Festival
    • Repositioning interprofessional education from the margins to the centre of Australian health professional education - what is required?

      Dunston, Roger; Forman, Dawn; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Steketee, Carole; Rogers, Gary D.; Moran, Monica Catherine; University of Technology Sydney; University of Derby; University of Notre Dame; Griffith University; et al. (CSIRO, 2018-01-16)
      Abstract Objective This paper examines the implementation and implications of four development and research initiatives, collectively titled the Curriculum Renewal Studies program (CRS), occurring over a 6-year period ending in 2015 and focusing on interprofessional education (IPE) within Australian pre-registration health professional education. Methods The CRS was developed as an action-focused and participatory program of studies. This research and development program used a mixed-methods approach. Structured survey, interviews and extensive documentary analyses were supplemented by semi-structured interviews, focus groups, large group consultations and consensus building methods. Narrative accounts of participants’ experiences and an approach to the future development of Australian IPE were developed. Results Detailed accounts of existing Australian IPE curricula and educational activity were developed. These accounts were published and used in several settings to support curriculum and national workforce development. Reflective activities engaging with the findings facilitated the development of a national approach to the future development of Australian IPE – a national approach focused on coordinated and collective governance and development. Conclusion This paper outlines the design of an innovative approach to national IPE governance and development. It explores how ideas drawn from sociocultural theories were used to guide the choice of methods and to enrich data analysis. Finally, the paper reflects on the implications of CRS findings for health professional education, workforce development and the future of Australian IPE. What is known about the topic? IPE to enable the achievement of interprofessional and collaborative practice capabilities is widely accepted and promoted. However, many problems exist in embedding and sustaining IPE as a system-wide element of health professional education. How these implementation problems can be successfully addressed is a health service and education development priority. What does this paper add? The paper presents a summary of how Australian IPE was conceptualised, developed and delivered across 26 universities during the period of the four CRS studies. It points to strengths and limitations of existing IPE. An innovative approach to the future development of Australian IPE is presented. The importance of sociocultural factors in the development of practitioner identity and practice development is identified. What are the implications for practitioners? The findings of the CRS program present a challenging view of current Australian IPE activity and what will be required to meet industry and health workforce expectations related to the development of an Australian interprofessional- and collaborative-practice-capable workforce. Although the directions identified pose considerable challenges for the higher education and health sectors, they also provide a consensus-based approach to the future development of Australian IPE. As such they can be used as a blueprint for national development.
    • Representing camp: Constructing macaroni masculinity in eighteenth century visual satire

      Gowrley, Freya; University of Edinburgh (University of South Florida Tampa, 2019-05-06)
      This article asks how ‘Camp,’ as defined in Sontag’s 1964 essay, ‘Notes on Camp,’ might provide a valuable framework for the analysis of late eighteenth-century satirical prints, specifically those featuring images of the so-called ‘macaroni.’ Discussing a number of satirical prints and contemporary writings on the macaroni, the article reads them against Sontag’s text in order to establish its utility as a critical framework for understanding the images’ complex relationship of content, form, and function.
    • Research methods teaching in vocational environments: developing critical engagement with knowledge?

      Gray, Claire; Turner, Rebecca; Sutton, Carole; Petersen, Carolyn; Stevens, Sebastian; Swain, Julie; Esmond, Bill; Schofield, Cathy; Thackeray, Demelza; University of Derby (Taylor Francis, 2015)
      Knowledge of research methods is regarded as crucial for the UK economy and workforce. However, research methods teaching is viewed as a challenging area for lecturers and students. The pedagogy of research methods teaching within universities has been noted as underdeveloped, with undergraduate students regularly expressing negative dispositions to the subject. These are challenges documented in university-based higher education (HE), yet little is known of the practices and pedagogies of research methods teaching in the college-based HE setting, where the delivery of HE has grown in prominence in recent years. Because college-based HE is widely regarded as primarily vocational, incorporating research methods into curricula may be seen as an additional level of complexity for staff to negotiate. In this article, we report on the data collected within a study to examine research methods teaching in social science disciplines on HE programmes taught in college-based settings in England. Drawing on data obtained from college-based HE lecturers and students, we discuss features of research methods teaching and how these may be applied with a diverse student body, within vocationally focused institutions. Issues of institutional culture, resourcing and staff development are also considered as these are identified as integral to the successful embedding of research methods teaching.
    • Researchers, fixed-term contracts and universities: Understanding the law in context

      Hooley, Tristram; Oliver, Liz; University of Derby; Careers Research and Advisory Centre (Vitae, 2010)
      This report examines UK legislation on fixed-term contracts1 in the context of higher education institutions (HEIs). Since fixed-term employment has become a common feature of working life within universities and periods of fixed-term employment have constituted a key step in many research career contexts, the legislation raises specific issues for HEIs and researchers.
    • Researching surviving cancer and sexuality using visual methods: a reflection on research rationale and negotiating ethical issues

      Hammond, Natalie; Cheeseman, Matthew; Chantry, Andrew; Peng, Guo Chao Alex; Manchester Metropolitan University; Sheffield University (Policy Press, 2015-11-01)
      This article offers an account of incorporating visual methods into a research framework inspired by graphic medicine, where comics are used in patient care. We conducted interviews, focused on sexual wellbeing, with 12 leukaemia survivors. The findings from these interviews were transformed into visual representations. We outline how our study was guided by feminist research principles and reflect on the tension between the flexibility that visual methods require and the rigidity of National Health Service ethical regulations
    • Rethinking live electronic music: a DJ perspective

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; University of Derby (Routledge, 2013-06)
      The author critiques the conventional understanding of live electronic music through empirical research on his own DJ practice and investigates others working in the field. In reviewing the opinions of theorists and practitioners in both the live electronic music genre and DJ-ing he argues against the body/machine dialectic that has determined much of the thinking in the former. The author forms a notion of the DJ as a real-time composer working beyond traditional binary distinctions who brings the human body and machine into a mutual relationship. Through practice-led research he charts an investigation beginning in physical human gesture and culminating in digital machine repetition. He concludes that mechanical and digital repetition do not obscure human agency in the production of live works and that this concern is imaginary.
    • Review: Theatre, performance and new media in Africa by Susan Arndt

      Bishton, Joanne; University of Derby (Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd., 2008)
    • Revisiting the retrospective of the work of Jordan McKenzie.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (20/04/2018)
      The act of art retrospective, specifically that placed within a museum or gallery, is to reflect on, and give knowledge of something past. A retroactive overview of a person’s artistic practice, the retrospective exhibition is backwards facing rather than future focused. As an act that normally specifies finiteness and conclusion a living artist’s retrospective produces an anomaly as a consequence. In 2016 I simultaneously staged the Alternative Document symposium and exhibition. This included Retrospective 2027 by Jordan McKenzie, a living artist, as a keynote performance in the symposium. Positioned as a keynote in the symposium rather than the exhibition it not only offered the retrospective as a representation of the artworks of the living, but also challenged traditional formats of structural placement. Situated within colloquialism rather than exhibition, the aim was to set it adrift from the gallery and the predominantly visual to open it to critical debate. This paper analyses an approach to retrospective that differs from the conventional, as one that is performed, gestural and event-based rather than static and exhibited in a gallery and includes my critical conversation with the artist. It asks what this means for the artwork, the documentary in performance and ephemeral practice, the archive, the exhibition and retrospective in McKenzie’s work. Presented in Documents, Alternatives: a symposium of artistic process and practice, BSAD (Bath), 20 April 2018. The symposium is staged simultaneously with the exhibition Documents, Alternatives (#3) at BSAD gallery, which is open to the public 20th April – 1st May 2018. The exhibition and symposium are part of the Alternative Document, a project by Dr. Angela Bartram, Associate Professor and Head of Arts Research, at University of Derby.
    • The revival of the ancient technique of printing with mordants and dyeing in bi-colourants to achieve contemporary poly-chromic designs

      Wells, Kate; Churn, Kate; University of Derby (NOVA University of Lisbon Campus Caparica / Caparica Portugal, 25/10/2018)
      This paper explores the creation of a range of sustainable patterned fabrics by employing various Bio-colorants (natural dyes) in combination with a range of mordants that have a lesser impact upon the environment to create a poly-chromatic design within single dyeing process. Practice based research was undertaken into dyeing and printing with Madder, Logwood, Weld and Woad or Indigo in combination with a selection of mordants Alum, Copper Acetate, Iron Acetate and Tannins onto a range of fabric bases which includes the new regenerated fibres alongside traditional natural ones as a sustainable option (1, 2). Mordants that have been used from ancient times produce a pattern during the dyeing process. By looking at these historical (3, 4) and traditional applications (5) from across the globe, it was hoped that a more sustainable method of patterning either through printed (screen and block), stencilled or hand-painted techniques could be designed. According to Robinson (6): Pliny the Elder (AD 23-79), writing of the ancient Egyptians, stated that, ‘Garments are painted in Egypt in a wonderful manner, the white clothes being first coated, not with colours but with drugs which absorb the colours. Although the dyeing liquid is one colour, the garment is dyed several colours according to the different properties of the drugs which have been applied to the different parts: nor can this be washed out’ It is thought that this passage was describing madder dye alongside as the various mordants – alum, iron salts and copper salts as they were known at that time (7). Since this ancient time, the application of natural dyes evolved over the centuries into an advanced form of dyeing as this was only form of permanently colouring fabrics until the advent of synthetic dyes by Perkins in 1856. The ‘Art of Dyeing’ became a highly secretive and protected practice with the formation of Dyers Guilds from the 14th c. The technique of the application of different mordants to create more than one colour evolved within the Far East employed initially to produce the ‘Indienne mania’ (Chintz) madder dyed calicos of the 17th c. and 18th c. and later with the development of ‘Turkey Red’ prints, the secrete of which remained undisclosed until the late 18th c. (7). (1) Garcia. 2012, Natural Dye Workshop: Colors Of Provence Using Sustainable Methods, London: Studio Galli. (2) Dean, J, & Casselman, K. 1999, Wild Colour, London: Mitchell Beazley. (3) Bird. 1875. The Dyers Handbook. USA. (4) Hummel, J.J. 1885. The Dyeing of Textile Fabrics. London: Cassell & Company Ltd (5) Bilgrami, N. 1990. Singh jo Ajrak. Pakistan: Department of Culture and Tourism Government of Sindh. (6) Robinson, S. 1969. A History of Dyed Textiles, London: W & J Makckay & Co Ltd. (7) Chenciner, R. 2001. Madder Red: A History of Luxury and Trade. Richmond: Cuzon Press. (8) Storey, J. 1992 The Thames and Hudson Manual of Textile Printing. London: Thames and Hudson.
    • The rhizomatic West: representing the American West in a transnational, global Media Age

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska PressOutsider, 2008)
    • The Right Start in Life: Exploring an innovative new online career solution

      Hooley, Tristram; Sahar, Arif; University of Derby (2016-05)
    • The rise of the citizen author: Writing within social media

      Johnson, Miriam J.; Oxford Brookes University (Springer, 2017-03-03)
      The concept of the citizen author is defined and explored within the publishing industry. In order to understand what positions the citizen author currently, and potentially could, hold it begins with a historical view of their rise, including concepts of their eighteenth century antecedents. But the focus of this research is on their growth alongside that of social media platforms. This allows for drawing out relationships between genre fiction, publishers, and the citizen author, which provides a more full understanding of the power dynamics involved when publishers, social media, and the citizen authors mix in the current industry climate.
    • The rise of the comics künstlerroman, or, the limits of comics acceptance: the depiction of comics creators in the work of Michael Chabon and Emily St. John Mandel

      King, Daniel; University of Derby (Open Library of the Humanities, 2018-12-28)
      The künstlerroman is a genre with a long and celebrated past. From Bret Easton Ellis’ Lunar Park (2005) to John Irving’s The World According to Garp (1978) and Saul Bellow’s Humboldt’s Gift (1975), the genre has occupied a prominent place in bestseller lists and awards shortlists. The enduring popularity and continued critical celebration of the künstlerroman makes it all the more striking that, since the turn of the millennium a new kind of author-protagonist has emerged — the graphic-novelist-protagonist. This move not only inducts graphic novelists into this existing — and prestigious — literary genre, it also draws them into the same struggle for recognition in which other novelist-protagonists have long been involved. Drawing on the recent examples of Michael Chabon’s The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000) and Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven (2014), in this article I argue that there is a clear move toward the serious discussion of comics and comics creators in contemporary literature, an increasing willingness to talk about comics and their makers that is marked by a surprising faith in the fitness of comics as a mode of self-expression and a recognition of the clear kinship between prose authors and graphic novelists.
    • The role of brokerage within career guidance: a literature review

      Hallam, Rachel; Morris, Marian; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; Mackay, Susan; SWQ; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      This paper reports on the findings from a review of the literature relating to the brokerage role of career guidance services. The review initially identified over 15,000 papers for possible inclusion and a systematic process was applied which sifted these down to only the highest quality research papers with direct relevance to the research question: How is effective brokerage between education and employers organised?The review found that much of the research in this area is based on organisations with a sole remit for brokering the links between employers and education. Their funding and delivery models were, in most cases, quite different to that of the current National Careers Service. The studies also focused on the perceived impact and benefits of the links between employers and educational institutions, with rather less evidence on the pre-conditions for such links or on the ways in which they could best be engendered and supported. Nonetheless, the research highlighted the wide-ranging benefits these links can have for both parties, with impacts on: • Schools, colleges and pupils such as: improved motivation and attainment; contextualisation of learning; reduction in NEET; greater understanding of industries and educational pathways; clarification of career aspirations; and improved transitions into further and higher education, training or the workplace. • Employers such as: the development of company personnel; the building of a positive reputation for organisations and the contribution to business recruitment strategies. Based on this evidence, the review provides some summary guidance on the factors that the National Careers Service should consider in the development of a brokerage role between education institutions and employers.
    • The role of education and training in the development of technical elites: work experience and vulnerability

      Esmond, Bill; Atkins, Liz; Suart, Rebecca; University of Derby (VETNET, 2019-09-19)
      Whilst education and training systems in Europe have provided qualifications preparing candidates for highly skilled, responsible occupational roles, early research indicated that firms preferred to promote to such positions internally. Following changes to labour markets, several countries now place greater emphasis on early workplace learning, in the hope that transitions to work will be eased by experience of workplace environments. The outcomes of these shifts were explored through case studies in England of provision where work-based learning provides a high level of course content. Whilst students and educators ascribed value to these early experiences, evidence emerged of a narrowing of skills taught in work settings and em-phasis on behaviours and attributes. This emphasis is reflected among disadvantaged groups such as young women preparing for service roles: this paper argues for attention to the vulnerabilities of these groups, whose exclusion contributes to the reproduction of ‘elite’ occupations.
    • The role of the teacher today

      Hayes, Dennis; Marshall, Toby; University of Derby (SCETT, 2016-03-31)
      This is a collection of essays based on themes discussed at conferences and seminars between 2009 and 2012 organised the Standing Committee for the Education and Training of Teachers (SCETT), a charity (Number 296425) established by the education trade unions in 1981. Visit www.scett.org.uk for more information. A limited number of hard copies of the book are available from Professor Dennis Hayes at the University of Derby for £4.30 which includes postage and packing (email d.hayes@derby.ac.uk) or find the book on Amazon.
    • Roundtable: (Re)presenting the archive.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (ArchiveJournal.net, 2014-03)
    • Route 57 issue 11: the feisty font review

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Ladkin, Sam; Lehóczky, Ágnes; Levick, Carmen; Morris, Paula; Piette, Adam; University of Sheffield (Spirit Duplicator, 2015)
      The creative writing journal of the University of Sheffield. Featuring over fifty writers in non-fiction, poetry, fiction and drama. Ágnes Lehóczky is the poetry editor and Paula Morris the fiction editor.
    • Route 57 issue 12: if anything younger

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Honor Gavin, Alice; Kindellan, Michael; Lehóczky, Ágnes; Zerihan, Rachel; University of Sheffield (Spirit Duplicator, 2016)
      A second edited volume of the creative writing journal. Featuring over fifty writers in non-fiction, poetry, fiction and drama. Ágnes Lehóczky is the poetry editor and Honor Gavin the fiction editor.