• The Playwrights’ Register

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Yr Academi Gymreig, 1984)
    • The poet as sage, sage as poet in 1816: Aesthetics and epistemology in Percy Bysshe Shelley’s ‘Hymn to Intellectual Beauty’

      Whickman, Paul; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2016-09-02)
      Philosophy and poetry for Shelley are considered as inter-related or even interchangeable. Nevertheless, critics have often struggled to reconcile the two sides of the figure of Shelley; the Romantic poet and the Enlightenment-inspired sceptical philosopher. If, in a Lockean sense, language is both an imperfect conveyor of knowledge and, as for Thomas Paine, the tool of tyranny, then this raises the question of how Shelley is to operate as a poet. Focusing on ‘Hymn to Intellectual Beauty’, this essay considers not only how Shelley’s philosophy is thematically an aspect of the poem but also how this manifests itself aesthetically. The philosophical problem of the relationship between language and knowledge, this essay contends, is an aesthetic one. Aesthetics and epistemology therefore intersect in the poem, overcoming the perceived tension between Shelley as poet and Shelley as philosopher.
    • Poland translated: post-Communist writing in Poland: a survey

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Springer Verlag, 2010)
    • The Politics of literature: Poland 1945-89

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (University of Wales Press, 1989)
      This study explores the relationship between literature and politics. It asks what literature can tell us about politics, and it does so by exploring Polish literary-political culture in the years 1945-89. During these years the Communist Party, for all its opposite intent, preserved the power of the word and the moral and political position of writers at a time when in western Europe and America writers were no longer taken very seriously as political commentators. This was a period when writers in Poland occupied a position of great moral authority. Many believed that, in spite of Soviet power, an independent Polish socialism was a possibility, and that even if they were not able to shake off the power of Moscow they might still be able to turn communism into a force for good.
    • Popular experience and cultural representation of the Great War, 1914-1918

      Larsen, Ruth M.; Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017-09-01)
      This book considers the diversity of the experiences and legacies of the First World War, looking at the actions of those who fought, those who remained at home and those who returned from the arena of war. It examines Edwardian ideals of gender and how these shaped social expectations of the roles to be played by men and women with regards to the national cause. It looks at men’s experiences of combat and killing on the Western Front, exploring the ways in which masculine gender ideals and male social relationships moulded their experience of battle. It shows how the women of the controversial White Feather campaign exploited traditional ideas of heroism and male duty in war to embarrass men into volunteering for military service. The book also examines children’s toys and recreation, underlining how play helped to promote patriotic values in children and thus prepared boys and girls for the respective roles they might be called upon to make in war. A strong sense of British identity and a faith in the superiority of British values, customs and institutions underpinned the collective war effort. The book looks at how, even in captivity at the Ruhleben internment camp, the British gave expression to this identity. The book emphasises the extent to which this was a conflict in which Britain sought to defend and even extend its imperial dominion. It also discusses how different political and cultural agendas have shaped the way in which Britain has remembered the War. As such, the book reflects the diversity of popular experience in the War, both at home and in the empire. Britain’s entry into the War in 1914 helped to ensure that it became a truly global conflict. The contributors here draw attention to the significant social, cultural and political legacies for Britain and her empire of a conflict which, one hundred years later, continues to be the subject of considerable controversy.
    • Popular music and the breast.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014-09)
      This A-to-Z encyclopedia explores the historical magnitude and cultural significance of the breast over time and around the world. My entry looks at how the breast is mediated on LP covers.
    • Portraits from green fingered.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Photoworks North Ltd., 2015)
    • Positioning children as artists through a ceramic arts project and exhibition: children meaning making

      Yates, Ellen; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-03-15)
      This article describes a ceramic arts research project that provided children with opportunities for meaning making using bone china clay, a medium with strong cultural and historical links to the city where the research took place. The children were positioned as artists and their work was curated and presented for exhibition by an international ceramic artist, affording equal status to their work as that of adults. Findings identified that children made meaning based on lived experiences, popular culture, unique family and cultural heritage, and school identities. We also acknowledge that adult attitudes and school schedules can both enable and limit children’s creativity. We further assert that the professional exhibition validated children’s processes, competence, cultural funds of knowledge and agency.
    • ‘The postman wears out fast’: Retiring sick in London’s Victorian post office

      Green, David; Brown, Douglas; McIlvenna, Kathleen; Shelton, Nicola; Kingston University; Kings College, London; University of Derby; University College London (Taylor and Francis, 2019-09-26)
      The Post Office was an extremely important institution and London was the focal point of its operations. Throughout the nineteenth century, London was the main sorting centre and accounted for a third of the mail delivered in Britain. However, London postal workers were relatively unhealthy and the majority retired before they reached 60, mainly because of ill health. Using new evidence drawn from pension records, this article explores the extent of ill health in the London workforce, comparing it to that in the Metropolitan Police. For postmen, orthopaedic conditions were the main problem, relating to the ability to walk long distances. This was similar to the problems encountered in the police. For other postal workers, notably letter sorters, mental illness and poor vision were the main problems, relating to the pressure of having to work irregular hours, often at night-time and in poorly designed and overcrowded workspaces. These problems were exacerbated by the increasing frequency of mail deliveries and the constant shortage of space in the main headquarters building. In response to these issues and workers’ concerns, the Post Office introduced a range of measures including a medical service and generous sickness pay, more offices, new technologies to speed the flow of mail, better lighting, and changed working practices to ease pressures on the workforce.
    • A preservice teacher’s learning of instructional scaffolding in the EAL practicum

      Nguyen, Minh Hue; Penry Williams, Cara; Monash University (Victoria, Australia) (MHN); La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia) (CPW) (Australian Literacy Educator's Association, 2019-10-01)
      This qualitative case study examines how a preservice English as an Additional Language (EAL) teacher from the Faculty of Education at a large Melbourne-based university learned to scaffold EAL learning during a two-week practicum in a secondary school and the factors shaping his cognition. The data sources include individual interviews, oral reflections on lessons and recordings of those same lessons. The study was underpinned by a sociocultural perspective on scaffolding and van de Pol, Volman, and Beishuizen's (2010) framework for analysing scaffolding, which is based on a synthesis of previous models and findings. The findings indicate that the preservice teacher implemented a number of scaffolding strategies during the EAL practicum. The use of these strategies was shaped by the preservice teacher’s theoretical knowledge of scaffolding and belief about its importance, which he gained from the teacher education coursework and his prior practicum experience. Learning within practice was also found to be important in his cognition of scaffolding as through the practicum he developed knowledge about his students’ abilities and their difficulties in learning EAL, which are the basis for his contingent scaffolding strategies. Based on the findings, the paper suggests that instructional scaffolding is an important area of professional learning, especially for teachers working with EAL students, and needs to be explicitly built into teacher education in both coursework and the teaching practicum.
    • Primo Levi as storyteller: The uses of fiction, creative non-fiction and the hard to classify in Levi’s narrative of the Holocaust.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013-04)
      The varied forms of short prose writing used by Primo Levi in his continued narrative of the Holocaust allows a reconsideration of him as not merely its witness, but also as its storyteller. Taking The Periodic Table ([1975] 1986) as a conscious shift in Levi’s writing direction this article examines where the fictional developments and memory collide, and attempts to assess if this produces a more memorable format in order to reveal a difficult history. Do we continue to read Levi because his honesty is greater than the bare facts, and is there such a thing as a Holocaust aesthetic?
    • Printing Animation: a conference paper delivered for the Creative Animation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), Edge Hill University

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-07)
      A critical practice proposal that examines how animation can be reclaimed from the ephemeral and digital and returned to a tangible and material visibility. The proposal takes its cue from Disney’s partnership with Xerox and photomechanical printing processes in the late 1950s when in response to the complexity of the animation design for feature animation ‘101 Dalmations’ (1961), Ub Iwerks simplified the ink and paint process by copying the animator’s paper drawing directly onto acetate cell and removing the intermediary inking process. My research methodology involves a reengagement with a mechanical, machine and tool based craft process (screen printing, monoprinting, photocopying and typewriting) not to imbue the discipline in a romantic quasi-medievalism, nor to propose further economies in the industrial production pipeline, but instead to reintroduce notions of serendipity, chance, wrongness, interruption, iteration and materiality. Printing is a rich repository for metaphor: duplication, doubling, remaking, copying, contact. These characteristics allow animation to explore, inhabit and exploit the liminal space between digital production and analogue mechanical processes. This approach also suggests how classical animation production and print processes may be repurposed to create a new hybrid tangible animated state that is visible, material, spatial and plastic - existing outside the conventional notions of animated time.
    • Professional standards and recognition for UK personal tutoring and advising

      Walker, Ben; Manchester Metropolitan University; University of Derby (Frontiers Media SA, 2020-10-14)
      The Higher Education and Research Act established both a regulatory framework and the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) with associated metrics for student retention, progression and employability in the United Kingdom. As a key site in meeting these requirements, the significance of personal tutoring is clear. Despite this, according to existing institutional research, there is a need for developmental support, greater clarification on the requisite competencies, and adequate recognition for those undertaking this challenging role. Moreover, arguably compounding these concerns is the lack of distinct professional standards for personal tutoring and advising against which to measure effective practice, only recently addressed by the publication of The UKAT Professional Framework for Advising and Tutoring. Through a review of the literature supported by findings from a survey of practitioners, this paper discusses the need for such standards, and the skills and competencies populating them. Additionally, the usefulness of pre-existing standards pertinent to tutoring work (such as the United Kingdom Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting LearninginHE)areevaluatedandthevalueandrecognitionwithwhichpersonaltutoring standards could be associated are advanced. The survey supported the need for specificstandards–representedbytheUKATframework–asevidentfromtheliterature. Justificationsprovidedforboththisandtheopposingviewareexamined.Clarityforboth individual practitioners and institutions was stipulated along with meaningful recognition and reward for this work which is considered highly important and yet ‘invisible.’ The participants and literature reviewed identify relevant content along with illuminating the debate about the relationships between personal tutoring, teaching and professional advising roles. Valuable analysis of standards, recognition and reward also emerged. This is considered by discussing the connection between standards and changes to practice, responses to policy developments and the purpose of ‘standards’ in comparison to ‘guidance.’ The paper proposes that the recent introduction and use of a bespoke framework is a necessary response to alleviate some of the current tensions which beset personal tutoring and advising in higher education.
    • Professionalism in Careers

      Hooley, Tristram; Johnson, Claire; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Careers England and the Career Development Institute, 2016-03)
      This briefing paper sets out the background, evidence and key issues relating to professionalism in careers work in England. The work is produced on behalf of Careers England and the Career Development Institute (CDI), but the paper does not represent the policy of either organisations.
    • The protectorate playhouse: William Davenant's cockpit in the 1650s

      Watkins, Stephen; University of Derby (John Hopkins University Press, 2019-07)
    • Puff of smoke: Curator's symposium.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (The Tetley, 02/05/2014)
      This day-long workshop and symposium at The Tetley is geared at curators, producers and programmers who already work with performance practices in a gallery context or intend to. It will be an opportunity to shape debate and to create new networks and communities of practice. The day will begin with a case study of Lisa Watts' touring research project Skittish (2013 -2014) presented by artist and writer Joanne Lee (Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at NottinghamTrent University). The research and dialogue for this case study has prompted a series of provocations which will initiate the day's discussions, which will be led by four artist/performers; Jordan McKenzie (artist of performance/ film/ site specific art); Ralph Dartford (ACE officer, writer, performance poet); Victoria Gray (artist of performance/ video) and Sarah Spanton (artist, performer, facilitator and arts consultant). Intended to be a richly conversational session, participants will be encouraged to share and discuss their own experience of and questions about curating live works in a gallery context.
    • ‘Queering’ the speaking subject in Sarah Waters’s The Little Stranger

      Bishton, Joanne; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
    • Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (Oriel Davies Gallery, 2016-10)
      Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run” (Two Screen-prints) exhibited in the Imaginary worlds exhibition. Imaginary Worlds was an exhibition of artworks by 52 illustration and book artists from Wales, other parts of the UK, Europe and Australia.
    • Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run 1

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2015-02)
      This work is one of a number of responses that have been inspired by and made about the village that I live in. The village has one remaining farm within the curtilage of the built environment and the villager’s occupations have drastically changed over the years. There was 480 acres under cultivation at the time of the Domesday Book and at one time there was thirty working farms recorded in the village. My images focus on the environment, the evolution of the land without the control of the farming community, and the consequences this has on nature & rural living. Exhibited at University of Derby, Nature Connections exhibition and Art via post exhibition at Arts at the Armory in Somerville, MA. USA