• Olivia Dunham and the new frontier in fringe

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (McFarland, 2019-07-12)
      From the Star Wars expanded universe to Westworld, the science fiction western has captivated audiences for more than fifty years. These twelve new essays concentrate on the female characters in the contemporary science fiction western, addressing themes of power, agency, intersectionality and the body. Discussing popular works such as Fringe, Guardians of the Galaxy and Mass Effect, the essayists shed new light on the gender dynamics of these beloved franchises, emphasizing inclusion and diversity with their critical perspectives.
    • On going out and the experience of students.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      Proposes a model for undergraduate culture in the night-time economy, mapping three stages from an HEI-centric culture into a heterogeneous culture and finally a homogenous culture, as youth culture and the night-time economy develop through the twentieth century.
    • On rigidity, Reus and Reich.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2016)
    • On the water

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Cheeseman, Matthew; Southampton Solent University (Solent Press, 2017-04)
      On The Water is a collection of prose, non-fiction, performance writing and poetry, which has been written and assembled by writers from Southampton. The book is arranged to take the reader on a journey. It's not organised into sections of prose or poetry but from the feel of the pieces. We begin with the most emotional and personal pieces and end with the most universal and abstract. This is our own interpretation of being 'on the water'. I wonder what the woman whose voice is blared through loudspeakers across the country is like herself. I wonder if she's even alive, I wonder how she'd feel knowing her voice announced deaths a dozen times a day in the most loosely veiled code commuters know. I wonder how many voices break a year to her voice.
    • On the water.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Southampton Solent University (Solent Press, 2017)
      A creative writing journal for Southampton Solent University, featuring the work of staff, students and local residents. It was designed through collaboration with Go! Grafik and students.
    • Only a "scrap of paper": The prison reading of British conscientious objectors, 1916-1919

      Feely, Catherine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
    • Only qualifications count: Exploring perceptions of continuing professional development (CPD) within the career guidance sector.

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-05-03)
      This paper explores the views of a group of career development practitioners undertaking a postgraduate qualification as a form of continuing professional development (CPD). It offers insights into how these practitioners perceive and view different forms of CPD. A case study methodology was adopted to gather examples of CPD activities practitioners engaged in and the value placed on these in supporting the development of professional practice. Their views were synthesised to create a typology representing a differentiated model of CPD. The model proposes three types of CPD: operational, experiential and formal. Formal CPD is perceived as having the highest value in developing professional practice. The study supports a deeper understanding of how careers practitioners engage with and understand CPD.
    • Opening up the debate: Irish radio, Facebook, and the creation of transnational cultural public spheres.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Transcript Verlag, 02/10/2018)
      Radio has become an increasingly digitised medium in recent years with a growing online presence becoming ever more integral to the medium’s output and identity. Furthermore, it has become integral to radio stations’ audience recruitment and retention strategies. While radio has long been a platform for on-air public debate and discourse, the limitations of technology always meant that only a limited number of listeners could take part. The largest social network site, Facebook, now provides the infrastructure for public spheres to exist online which means a much wider audience can participate and contribute to discussions and debates including the extensive Irish diaspora – which has grown significantly as a cohort since 2008 due to mass emigration – making it a transnational phenomenon. Using the Irish radio industry and Radio Kerry as a case study this research found that although some instances of traditional Habermasian public spheres exist on radio station Facebook pages, such instances were very limited. Instead audiences are participating in what closely resemble cultural public spheres (McGuigan 2005) where the topics of discussion are of a cultural, social or emotional nature, eschewing debates on current affairs/public issues. This chapter looks at the use of Facebook for audience recruitment and retention from an Irish context and within that is focused on the local commercial radio station Radio Kerry. The methodology included textual analysis of Facebook page content, interviews with industry professionals, an audience survey and one in-depth interview with an audience member.
    • Orpheus Suite

      Wilson, Colin; University of Derby (2014-09)
      Exhibition of black & white, archival, hand-printed, mural, analogue photographs, comprising three bodies of work; ‘Silent Compositions’, ‘Minor Consolations’ and ‘Morpheus’.
    • The Orrery/The Orrery: between image and object

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2012)
    • Otherlings

      Bartram, Angela; McCloskey, Paula; Baker, Steve; Davies, Huw; Basi, Philip Ranjit; Fisher, Craig; Vardy, Sam; Rushton, Stephanie; Mallinson, Mally; Parker, Christine; et al. (University of Derby, 18/10/2019)
      Otherlings is an exhibition featuring work from Ang Bartram, Steve Baker, Huw Davies and Philip Ranjit Basi, Craig Fisher, Paula McCloskey and Sam Vardy, Stephanie Rushton and Mally Mallinson, and Christine Parker. The overarching theme of the artworks within the exhibition suggests something beyond the parameters of dominancy and its cultural representation. The work in many ways offers explicit or implicit ways to connect us to other perspectives, and experiences through different and often unseen and discussed encounters. It thus opens up new paradigms for debate, for how we might live with care and compassion and function with others, as part of a world shared by many.
    • Our Story on Screen: Understanding Immigration Through the Experiences of Others

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-06-22)
      Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby gathers the personal testimonies of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England, who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The content has been collated into a 26-minute film that offers a compendium of stories, anecdotes and personal adventures which aims to offer the audience a better understanding of the experiences of emigrants in the hope they will develop a better appreciation of the migrant’s perspective on the often-thorny issue of immigration. By better understanding how emigration worked in the past the author argues that society can better understand how it works today. The personal perspectives of the contributors act as a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour. This is especially poignant during the current uncertainty caused by Brexit which threatens to revive old divisions between cultures and communities. This practice-based research output aims to inform the public of how rich and diverse British society is and how by being open to learning about other cultures and the immense contribution they make socially, politically, economically and culturally, that perhaps a more equal and accepting society can be cultivated. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This creative practice-based research is an oral history project at its core and was crewed by undergraduate media production students thus offering applied pedagogic benefits and a publicly disseminated media output. This project was produced for inclusion in REF21 and the survey methodology and key findings and themes that have arisen will also be discussed. The author proposes a 10-minute presentation including a 3-minute promo video of interview samples for context.
    • Our Story: Forging Connections Through Oral History

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-04-24)
      Our Story: A History of Irish in Derby is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of members of the Irish diaspora (N=14) that emigrated to the Derby (UK) in the 1950s and 60s. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project offers examples of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and the United Kingdom. In addressing the theme this case study is an example of how oral histories and first-person testimonies can help forge connections between different generations of the Irish community and help form their Irish identities. It also aims to form connections between different communities in Derby to foster a more vibrant sense of community and improve awareness and understanding of the Irish immigrant and diaspora experience. The research demonstrates how original testimonies can help to facilitate comparisons between the Irish and other diasporas in the UK to develop better understandings of the make-up of the diverse Derby community. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. To offer context a 4-minute film will be shown which offers a sample of the project and the personal stories for the audience.
    • Our Story: Preserving and Disseminating the Experiences of the Irish Diaspora in Derby

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-07-10)
      This paper proposes to discuss the project Our Story: A History of Irish in Derby (2020) as a case study for examination of the production process of editing over 8 hours of content from 14 contributors into an accessible 26-minute video for online public dissemination. Our Story is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of the Irish diaspora who emigrated to Derby city in the 1950s and 60s. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project acts as a recognition of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It also offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and the United Kingdom. This paper discusses the value of capturing the personal experiences of the ageing members of our population before their memories fade. The recordings therefore act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their experiences and contributions and use these to develop their own identities. The production and editing decisions were difficult but necessary as the producers worked towards creating an engaging work with a coherent narrative from multiple voices that would be viewed by a wide audience. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. To offer context a 4-minute audio visual piece will be shown which offers a sample of the project and the stories for the audience.
    • Our Story: The Experiences of Mid-Century Irish Emigrants to the UK

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-06-04)
      The purpose of Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby was to gather the personal testimonials of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England with a view to better understand their emigration and integration experiences as well as their contributions to the UK midlands region economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus was put on the members of the Irish community who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The 26-minute film of edited interviews offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour, the United Kingdom, to foster greater understand and acceptance of other nationalities. This is especially poignant during the period of uncertainty caused by Brexit. The recordings act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their Irish culture and heritage and use these to develop their own identities. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This paper will share some of the common themes that arose from the interview data which carry many elements of nostalgia as participants recount their migratory experiences. To offer context a 4-minute extract will be shown which offers a flavour of the project.
    • Our teachers: Collected memories of primary education in Derbyshire schools from 1944 - 2009

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (InScience Press, 2019-05-01)
      This paper presents findings from narrative interviews undertaken with 24 narrators who attended primary school in the decades from 1944 - 2009. Deductive themes were first selected by examining the quantity of content and relevance to the study. Four deductive themes were drawn from the narrators’ recollections: Our Teachers; The Lessons We Learned; Our Friendships and the Games We Played and finally The Books we Read. The focus of this paper is on the findings from one of the deductive themes: Our Teachers. Once the stories had been transcribed, they were analysed for inductive themes. These were identified as: Pupil-teacher relationship, noted across each of the decades. A gendered workforce, reflected in each decade, except 1999-2009. Teacher personality was common across all decades. Corporal punishment was common in the decades from 1944-1987, but not present after 1987. Finally, Teacher professionalism was a prevalent theme in most decades except 1999-2009. Key findings related to the connections that come with the relationship the teacher forms with their pupils. Teachers who break the mould are well remembered by pupils. The nature of the primary school workforce has changed since 1944, and is now perceived as being female dominated. Because of changes to legislation, the role of the teacher has evolved, the changes in professional behaviour are noted in the narrators’ stories, from decade to decade.
    • Overview of childhood (Mexico).

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Overview of early childhood education (Mexico)

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020-10-26)
      This article is part of the Bloomsbury Education and Childhood Studies online resource. It discusses the current educational system in the country for children under six, in the levels of Initial Education and Preschool Education. It includes issues on age range, the role of government in ECE, key providers, programs and services, staff and current challenges.
    • PaintingDigitalPhotography: Synthesis and difference in the age of media equivalence

      Hilliard, John; Honlold, Astrid; Robinson, Carl; Rosenstein, Tatiana; Rushton, Stephanie; Simson, Henrietta; Speidel, Klaus; Walker, Jame Faure; Weir, Catherine M; Wooldridge, Duncan; et al. (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 01/09/2018)
      We live in a digital age where the mediums of art are inextricably bound to the binary code, and painting and photography are redefined in their interconnected relationship through digital reconfiguration. As digitisation unmoors these mediums from their traditional supports, their modes of production, display and dissemination shift. These changes bring about new ways of creating, and engaging with, artworks. Through this, the innate qualities of the mediums, previously anchored in their analogue nature, are re-evaluated through their connection with “the digital”. Born out of the PaintingDigitalPhotography conference, held at QUAD Derby, UK, in May 2017, this anthology of essays investigates aspects of interconnectivity between painting, digital and photography in contemporary art practices. It contributes to critical discourses around networks of associations by examining where syntheses occur, and differences remain, between these mediums at the beginning of the twenty first century.