• Part-time higher education in English colleges: Adult identities in diminishing spaces

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-01-21)
      Adult participation in higher education has frequently entailed mature students studying part time in lower-ranked institutions. In England, higher education policies have increasingly emphasised higher education provision in vocational further education colleges, settings which have extensive adult traditions but which mainly teach employment-based skills and are widely regarded as ‘outside’ higher education. This paper interrogates the significance of these dimensions of college higher education, through a qualitative study of identity formation by adult part-time students. Their accounts, developed through individual interviews and focus groups, emphasised the significance of work to their interpretations of higher education participation: these are compared here to a range of conceptualisations of identity that have been applied in relation to work organisations. This analysis indicates some of the ways in which pathways which adults may interpret as meaningful in terms of work-related identities may correspondingly be constrained by a narrow discourse of work-based skills and credentials.
    • Participatory arts: Mothers make art to heal minor mental health trauma.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (Mental Health Network, 03/11/2017)
      The course was for twelve weeks, three hours a week, and we had a crèche for the Mothers’ children. The group of women were recruited from playgroups and attended the course wishing to question their experience of birth, parenting and fertility through art. The group was not a co-facilitation group as such, but instead over the duration of the course they brought their skills and knowledge to their individual art practice. Whilst I facilitated the group I was simultaneously in another themed group therapy, as a participant, with an art therapist for women that had experienced minor trauma in the birth or early months of their child.
    • Past and future of science fiction theatre

      Callow, Christos Jr; Gray, Susan; Birkbeck, University of London (2014)
      The article focuses on the past history and future developments of science fiction theatre. It reports that science fiction theatre has existed unofficially since the 19th century and discusses several theatrical plays including "R.U.R," "Back to Methuselah," and "Endgame". It further mentions that science fiction theatre concerns with the impact of technology on our lives and is also capable of providing importance to theatre and science fictional culture in future.
    • Patient and clinician engagement with health information in the primary care waiting room: A mixed methods case study

      Penry Williams, Cara; Elliott, Kristine; Gall, Jane; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (Page Press, 2019-03-11)
      Background. Primary care waiting rooms can be sites of health promotion and health literacy development through the provision of readily accessible health information. To date, few studies have considered patient engagement with televised health messages in the waiting room, nor have studies investigated whether patients ask their clinicians about this information. The aim of this study was therefore to examine patient (or accompanying person) and clinician engagement with waiting room health information, including televised health messages. Design and methods. The mixed methods case study was undertaken in a regional general practice in Victoria, Australia, utilising patient questionnaires, waiting room observations, and clinician logbooks and interviews. The qualitative data were analysed by content analysis; the questionnaire data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results. Patients engaged with a range of health information in the waiting room and reportedly received health messages from this information. 44% of the questionnaire respondents (33 of 74) reported watching the television health program, and half of these reported receiving a take home health message from this source. Only one of the clinicians (N=9) recalled a patient asking about the televised health program. Conclusions. The general practice waiting room remains a site where people engage with the available health information, with a televised health ‘infotainment’ program receiving most attention from patients. Our study showed that consumption of health information was primarily passive and tended not to activate patient discussions with clinicians. Future studies could investigate any link between the health infotainment program and behaviour change.
    • Pauper inventories, social relations, and the nature of poor relief under the old poor law, England, c. 1601–1834.

      Harley, Joseph; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2018-06-13)
      ABSTRACT During the old poor law, many paupers had their possessions inventoried and later taken by authorities as part of the process of obtaining poor relief. Historians have known about this for decades, yet little research has been conducted to establish how widespread the system was, what types of parishioners had their belongings inventoried and why, what the legal status of the practice was, and how it affected social relations in the parish. Using nearly 450 pauper inventories, this article examines these historiographical lacunae. It is argued that the policy had no legal basis and came from local practices and policies. The system is found to be more common in the south and east of England than in the north, and it is argued that the practice gradually became less common from the late eighteenth century. The inventorying of paupers’ goods often formed one of the many creative ways in which parishes helped the poor before 1770, as it guaranteed many paupers assistance until death. However, by the late eighteenth century the appraising of paupers’ goods was closely tied to a negative shift in the attitudes of larger ratepayers and officials, who increasingly wanted to dissuade people from applying for assistance and reduce expenditure.
    • Pax: variations

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2000)
      a novel
    • Pecking Order

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (TES Global Ltd, 2010-02)
      Peter Lennox keeps chickens, and they have taught him a great deal about behaviour, ethics, evolution and the psychopathic nature of modern 'efficiency' More Info: Light-hearted article in Times Higher Education. Co-authored with Edie, Dolly, Gertie and Flo
    • Pedagogies for developing undergraduate ethical thinking within geography

      Healy, Ruth. L; Ribchester, Chris; University of Derby (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019-12-05)
      Ethical issues are an example of ‘supercomplexity’, whereby ‘the very frameworks by which we orientate ourselves to the world are themselves contested’ (Barnett 2000, p. 257). Reflecting on ethical issues develops practical, critical thinking skills for dealing with such ‘supercomplexity’, as the frameworks students use to analyse ethical issues may be challenged and are likely to change over time. Yet, despite the wide-ranging potential, teaching ethics is often marginalized and segregated in the geographical curriculum, with ethics frequently being limited to prescriptive research considerations. This chapter offers a holistic approach to how ethical thinking might be embedded within geography programmes through a set of key principles related to: 1) recognizing; 2) reviewing; and 3) responding to ethical issues. This framework enables tutors to work with students to address ethical thinking and problems both inside and outside the curriculum, as well as to prepare students for their futures, including in the graduate-level workplace. It is suggested that encouraging students to reflect on ‘everyday’ ethical problems may sometimes act as a helpful first step prior to addressing ethical challenges within the content and practice of the discipline.
    • People in my world.

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (Oriel Davies Gallery, 2016-02)
      Digital image making print on characterisation. Limited edition Screen printed publication on the theme of weather A peer selected exhibition by Alex boyd Jones Curator, Director of Oriel gallery Amanda Farr and Chris Glynn Senior lecturer, Cardiff Metropolitan University.
    • A perceptual approach to the composition of meaning in artificial spatial audio

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; University of Derby; University of York (Audio Engineering Society, 01/03/2007)
      This paper describes research to inform the production of spatial audio that consolidates knowledge from several disparate fields. A perceptual model is proposed, based on contemporary perception theories, as the basis for new approaches to audio spatial understanding and a new approach to the generation of artificial sound fields. A fine-grain, modular model of perception is suggested that will allow audio attributes to have perceptual significance with respect to their causal trajectories. This represents an evolution towards the construction of believable sound fields from the traditional geometric, direction based approach to sound spatialisation.
    • Perceptual cartoonification in multi-spatial sound systems

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; University of Derby; University of York (24/06/2011)
      This paper describes large scale implementations of spatial audio systems which focus on the presentation of simplified spatial cues that appeal to auditory spatial perception. It reports a series of successful implementations of nested and multiple spatial audio fields to provide listeners with opportunities to explore complex sound fields, to receives cues pertaining to source behaviors within complex audio environments. This included systems designed as public sculptures capable of presenting engaging sound fields for ambulant listeners. The paper also considers questions of sound field perception and reception in relation to audio object scaling according to the dimensions of a sound reproduction system and proposes that a series of multiple, coordinated sound fields may provide better solutions to large auditorial surround sound than traditional reproduction fields which surround the audience. Particular attention is paid to the experiences since 2008 with the multi-spatial The Morning Line sound system, which has been exhibited as a public sculpture in a number of European cities.
    • Personal tutoring – boundaries in student support and success

      Walker, Ben; Manchester Metropolitan University (2018-10)
    • Perspectives on musical time and human/machine agency in the development of performance systems for live electronic music.

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Ferguson, John; University of Derby; Griffith University (08/09/2017)
      This paper investigates the exploration of musical time in Live Electronic Music and discusses the authors’ novel, technological systems that embrace experimental processes and discovery. Prevalent theories of creativity are investigated, as well as tools and techniques that can be utilised to provoke unanticipated, but satisfying outcomes. The exploratory use of digital tools and chance operations is considered alongside more determinate predictable processes. While musical metre in commercial music production often revolves around metronomic timing, and the industry-standard quantization grid can often steer producers towards chronometric precision, this is at odds with expressive human timing. By standardizing the way in which we perceive musical time, much commercial software fails to recognise the full worth of musical metre and misses opportunities to explore alternative modes of rhythm and groove. However, some software does include a capacity to move beyond quantization grid restrictions and delve into an exciting world of complex timing, and graphical programing/generative music can also offer exciting possibilities. This paper reflects on a number of practical experiments and new works that foreground rhythmical complexity. Some familiar historical examples are also contextualised alongside relevant contemporary artists. The authors foreground their own practices; Ferguson draws from recent work including ‘Drum Thing’, which celebrates the automation of percussion objects using computer-controlled solenoids, with software written in Pure data this project explores various approaches to randomisation with an Euclidean rhythm generator, where the greatest common divisor of two numbers is used rhythmically to drive beats and silences. Ferguson also discusses his work with ‘Circles’, where semi-random/quasi-intelligent sequencing and the creative negotiation of imagined agency is the main agenda. Vandemast-Bell’s work draws on contemporary Techno music in which he explores techniques not unlike those pioneered by Steve Reich and later developed by Brian Eno in their experiments with phase. He uses original electronic source material that is presented then deconstructed and improvisationally reimagined in real-time, to create synchronous / asynchronous rhythms and textures. Dynamic audio looping plays a central role in his performances and is invoked through Native Kontrol’s MIDI Remote Scripts for Ableton Live that extends Live’s looping potential. He uses a custom Ableton Push controller mapping to interact with the electronic material, which is evolved through the use of audio effects and dynamic processors. The overall agenda is to elucidate the role of human/technological agency. The authors reflect upon and compare/contrast their individual practices, from initial concept through creative process to final realization. Further to these individual perspectives, they collaboratively develop and discuss new musical materials and algorithmic processes using Pure data, these patches will be published with the paper, the overall goal being to encapsulate their collaborative perspective on the generation of complex rhythmical material in Live Electronic Music.
    • Perspectives on musical time in the development of performance systems for live electronic music.

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Ferguson, John; University of Derby; Griffith University (Routledge, 12/07/2019)
    • The philosophy of perception and stupidity

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (10/07/2015)
      Of all the strange phenomena in the so-far-known universe: exotic particles, black holes, dark energy/matter, 9-dimensional strings, none is stranger, more implausible or mysterious than the one right under our nose: perception. Perception does not simply consist of processing recentlyreceived sense data—that’s the smallest part of it. Perception fundamentally attempts the impossible: to try to reduce our situational ignorance to manageable proportions, to know the future. More, it is aimed at choosing the right future— the one that still has the perceiving organism in it. Repeat, ad infinitum until ultimately, it ends in failure. Ignorance is simply: not knowing, and is something we are all faced with every day. Stupidity lies in not knowing what it is that we don’t know, behaving as though we do know. A special kind of stupidity consists in hiding the extent of our own stupidity from ourselves. A criminal kind of stupidity consists of imposing our stupidity on others. The story of the evolution of intelligence is also the story of the rise of increasingly complex forms of stupidity. Academic study is the process of traveling to the frontiers of known territory to reach the edge of the land of ignorance, where we are all idiots. Research is simply an extension of the principle of perception, the impossible attempt at stupidity reduction. Stupidity is a fundamental feature of organic life, a driving force that underpins all development. Many study perception but few systematically study stupidity. Yet.
    • Photocinema:the creative edges of photography and film

      Campbell, Neil; Cramerotti, Alfredo; University of Derby (Intellect Books, 2013)
      Taking as its starting point the notion of photocinema—or the interplay of the still and moving image—the photographs, interviews, and critical essays in this volume explore the ways in which the two media converge and diverge, expanding the boundaries of each in interesting and unexpected ways. The book’s innovative approach to film and photography produces a hybrid “third space,” where the whole becomes much more than the sum of its individual parts, encouraging viewers to expand their perceptions to begin to understand the bigger picture. Photocinema represents a nuanced theoretical and practical exploration of the experimental cinematic techniques exemplified by artists like Wim Wenders and Hollis Frampton. In addition to new critical essays by Victor Burgin and David Campany, the book includes interviews with Martin Parr, Hannah Starkey, and Aaron Schuman and a portfolio of photographs from various new and established artists.
    • Place Setting: an art installation (comprising 22 China cups, 22 Tesco Toilet Tissue cardboard cores, some IKEA cardboard packaging) for the group exhibition ‘The Most Beautiful Things Cannot Be Seen’

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-02)
      Taking the work of William Morris as its starting point my work for The Most Beautiful Things Cannot Be Seen explores the relationship between beauty, nature and imagination. Place Setting is made up of 22 china tea and coffee cups turned upside down, to create a fairy ring of china ‘mushrooms’ on the gallery floor. The cheap, mass-produced, mostly transfer printed, china challenges William Morris’s romance of craft and production and his command ‘‘to have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful”. Place Setting exploits the transformative power of the ‘ready-made’ or found object. The act of making a tea cup resemble a mushroom, by turning it upside down, responds to the natural world and the flora and fauna that the Arts and Crafts Movement referenced in their work. In arranging the cups in the form of a fairy ring, the work makes a connection between the idealism of Morris and the location of Thornton. It is a place setting rich in folklore and myth making from Brontë shrines, Cottingley with its dubious photographic fairies, to nearby Keighley, once the centre of British theosophy and spiritualism.
    • Plato's Ambisonic Garden

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (11/12/2007)
      Discussion of the ontological status of items and relationships in extended artificial auditory environments; an explorable musical garden
    • Play

      Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Playing and performance in Uganda: A conversation with Professor Justinian Ssalongo Tamusuza

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd., 2013-11)