• The McDonaldization of higher education

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; Mandal, Luna; University of Derby (2017-07-12)
      2017 saw the publication of 'Beyond McDonaldization: Visions of Higher Education' (Routledge), the first chapter of which, 'Beyond the McDonaldization of Higher Education', develops and updates the ideas in this paper, which is an edited and revised version of the 'Introduction' to Dennis Hayes and Robin Wynyard’s book 'The McDonaldization of Higher Education' (Bergin and Garvey 2002). This well-received book introduced, and presented some criticisms of, the concept of 'McDonaldization' and examined the consequences of the process of McDonaldization to the university. A notable idea in the 2002 book was the concept of the 'therapeutic university' which, in part, explained the acquiescence of academics and students to the bureaucratising aspects of McDonaldization. The term is now widely used to describe a cultural climate in universities that sees today’s students as emotionally vulnerable and incapable of coping with challenging ideas.
    • The McDonaldization of higher education revisited.

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-06-02)
      Since The McDonaldization of Higher Education was published in 2002 the McDonaldizing processes of efficiency, predictability, reliability and control seem to have come to dominate universities throughout the world through turning students into consumers who buy degrees made up of bite-sized, credit-rated modules, subjecting universities to the requirements of national and global league tables and re-constructing lecturers as facilitators of the ‘student experience’. The success of university management in restructuring universities as McBusinesses is premised on a seeming contradiction. As universities have been McDonaldized they have spontaneously embraced therapy culture and have become therapeutic universities. The therapeutic approach towards students adopted by management was supported by academics who failed to see or challenge the new student-centred culture. Therapy Culture was not contradictory but complementary to the ruthless McDonaldization of universities. Discussions of the marketization and bureaucratization of higher education have been ineffectual in terms of understanding the importance of the therapeutic turn and therefore have not been able to cohere any effective resistance to McDonaldization. Taking our previous work forward, we examine the ineluctable connection between the forces leading to McDonaldization and the therapeutic turn and how they are leading to the McDonaldization of the student soul.
    • Measure learner performance on a scale of 1 to 10

      Walker, Ben; Stalk, Andrew; University of Lincoln (2015)
    • The media, ethnicity and religion as determinants of failed republics in Nigeria

      Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby; Benson Idahosa University (Delmas Communications Ltd, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria, 2010-10)
      This paper analyses the covert influence of ethnicity and religion on the media and voting in Nigerian elections and demonstrates how previous Nigerian republics have been hindered because of the impact of ethnic disservice and election crises, thereby providing opportunities for the military to topple each of those failed civilian administrations. Unfortunately, the press could not play a meaningful role in the 1964/65 election crises because the leaders of the factional groups in those conflicts were equally the owners of the early newspapers. So, they simply converted their papers into channels for fighting wars of personal vendetta. In fact, ethnic rivalry and religious intolerance are today the two major sources of conflict in Nigerian politics. For these reasons the paper advises the media to avoid playing the role of an advocate in the support of individuals and governmental agencies as well as ethnic nationality whose aims and objectives are inimical to the national interest and religious tolerance among the Nigerian public.
    • Medical Ephemera; A series of six screen-printed illustrations

      McNaney, Nicky; Allanson-Smith, Tracy; University of Derby (2015-03)
    • The mental health needs of refugee pupils.

      Hewitt, Shirley; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
    • Mermaids are always welcome

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (The Tetley, 2017-03)
      Screen-printed Artists Book exhibited at the Contemporary Artists’ PAGES, Book Fair, The Tetley, Leeds.
    • Migration and mobility in childhood (Mexico).

      Mancillas Bazan, Celia; Figueroa Diaz, Maria Elena; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • "Mild health I seek thee": Clare and Bloomfield at the limits of pastoral

      Lafford, Erin; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020)
      In The Country and the City (1973), Raymond Williams dismantled the “pastoral assumption” that the rural laboring class were pictures of health and vitality, uncovering instead the reality of embodied suffering in laboring-class poetry. This essay considers how Robert Bloomfield and John Clare interrogated this “pastoral assumption” of rural health, suggesting that to claim they merely rejected it risks losing sight of their subtle forms of poetic critique. The body, mind, and verse of laboring-class poets were subject to simultaneous cultural narratives of robust health and sickly weakness, within which Bloomfield and Clare had to forge their own distinctive poetic voices. They wrote poems, I argue, that ostensibly upheld a pastoral ideal of health emanating from the natural world, but also critiqued this ideal through an artful hesitancy, especially in their use of apostrophe. I consider the influence of Bloomfield’s “To My Old Oak Table” (1806), and “Shooter’s Hill” (1806) on Clare’s early poem “To Health” (1821) and one of his middle-period sonnets in particular. Far from being uncomfortable or under-confident in the pastoral mode, Bloomfield and Clare brought their own aesthetic experiments and experiences of precarious health to bear on some of its key tropes.
    • A Mixed History: Colliding Realities and the Hybrid Aesthetic

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (31/05/2016)
      With reference to historiography, the paper will ask how found footage can be manipulated to create alternate histories that challenge orthodox, ‘grand’ narratives within a hybrid aesthetic that foregrounds the diversity of its components, producing deliberate stylistic and ontological discontinuities. The practice echoes the ubiquity and malleability of video material in contemporary communications and media and examines the reliability and authenticity of the video image as a historical document. The work interrogates appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses.
    • More morphostasis than morphogenesis? The ‘dual professionalism’ of English Further Education workshop tutors

      Esmond, Bill; Wood, Hayley; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-03-27)
      An international repositioning of vocational teachers in relation to knowledge and the workplace is reflected in English Further Education through the terminology of ‘dual professionalism’. Particularly in settings most closely linked to specific occupations, this discourse privileges occupational expertise that vocational educators bring from their former employment alongside pedagogic expectations of the teaching role. In a qualitative study of recently qualified teachers employed substantially in workshop settings, using the analytical framework of Margaret Archer, workplace skills and generic attributes provided a basis for claims to expertise, extending to a custodianship of former occupations. Further augmentation of educator roles, however, appeared constrained by market approaches to development and employment insecurity in the sector and beyond. In Archer’s terms, the current environment appears to cast ‘dual professionalism’ as morphostasis, drawing on former practice at the expense of teacher identity in the face of insecurity. Morphogenesis into enhanced professional teacher identities, for example, developing coherent vocational pedagogies informed by research into advances in knowledge, appears the less likely outcome in the current and emerging sector.
    • Moving Landscapes

      Andrews-Roberts, Chas; Squires, Barry; University of Derby (2016)
      Moving Landscapes – breaking away from the traditional ‘landscape stills’, using moving-image & sound. Exhibition / Installation type work. In addition, the potential use of Olfactics (sense of smell) within the installation. How might the use of moving-image / sound / smell, extend the static photographic form? How can the spectator interact with the exhibit? Interested in investigating if the viewer’s physiological state changes in any way whilst viewing / interacting with the work (blood pressure etc), and to see if the work provokes a sense of relaxation.
    • Music as artificial environment: Spatial, embodied multimodal experience

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 26/04/2017)
      This chapter is a speculative exploration of the near-future possibilities of spatial music. Technologically, we can control many hundreds of loudspeakers and, conceivably, many thousands. What would we do with them? Here, music is considered as a particular example of arti cial information environments, with consequences for the perception of space. Arti cial information environments are those environments in which information transactions are governed by design. The distinction is clear in comparison with natural environments, but a ner distinction can be drawn between man-made environments (such as buildings), where some information transactions are haphazard, and information environments whose main purpose is to display information.
    • My loss is my loss

      Williams, Rhiannon; University of Derby (2014-07)
      UK touring exhibition developed by University of Manchester with AHRC funding. My Loss is My Loss (patchwork of used lottery tickets) was selected for exhibition. My Loss is My Loss was illustrated with critical commentary in the book accompanying this exhibition: P. Knight, P. Crosthwaite and N. Marsh (2014) Show Me the Money: The Image of Finance 1700 to the Present. Manchester University Press. It was illustrated again by the AHRC in their report The Impact of AHRC Research April 2014 – March 2015, p. 17.
    • NAHT Aspire Pilot Evaluation (Executive Summary)

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Radford, Neil; Institute of Education (2016-01)
      The NAHT Aspire Partner Schools programme is based on a multi-strand approach to school improvement. It utilises a five strand design focusing on, leadership, assessment for learning, learning environment, pedagogy and curriculum, and student and family support. This is delivered within clusters groups, underpinned by distributed leadership and supported by external advisers. The model is aligned with current international research on school improvement and effectiveness. It aims to support schools to progress from a Requires Improvement Ofsted assessment to a Good grading within three years. This evaluation reports on the implementation and the impact of NAHT Aspire at just over the two-year point in the programme (six of the nine term cycles of activity). Participants believe that it has improved their school, has empowered teaching staff and built leadership capacity. In addition, it is cost effective and has provided value for money when compared with the costs of forced academisation.
    • The narrative nightclub.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2018-05-04)
      This chapter brings together expertise in film and cultural studies to analyse representations of nightclub dancefloors in British films from the 1990s onwards: Human Traffic (Justin Kerrigan, 1999), Sorted (Alexander Jovy, 2000), Soul Boy (Shimmy Marcus, 2010), Everywhere and Nowhere (Menhaj Huda, 2011) and Northern Soul (Elaine Constantine, 2014). We use these films to identify persistent visual iconographies and accompanying ideological underpinnings within the British dancefloor film. To understand what these lms do not do, we also look by way of contrast to a film from France, Eden (Mia Hansen-Løve, 2014). Our approach links academic writing on dance music and nightclub cultures with analysis of filmic texts, and in doing so the chapter captures a sense of the wider discourse surrounding nightclubs and especially the dancefloors that often form their focus, on- and off-screen.
    • ‘The natural foundation of perfect efficiency’: Medical services and the Victorian post office

      McIlvenna, Kathleen; Brown, Douglas; Green, David R; Kingston University (Oxford University Press, 2019-01-23)
      This article explores the creation of the Post Office medical service. Working for the Post Office was relatively well-paid and an increasing number of doctors were employed. Medical provision expanded with the introduction of non-contributory pensions from mid-century and developed into a comprehensive and nationwide service that was involved at all stages of employment, from initial recruitment through to receiving a pension. Post Office doctors assessed candidates’ fitness for work, checked on sick absences, provided free medicine and advice and visited workers’ homes. Doctors were responsible for determining whether or not a worker should be pensioned off on grounds of ill health. The career of the first Chief Medical Officer, Dr Waller Lewis, also illustrates the range of other areas in which the Post Office medical service became involved, including the clinical assessment and relief of sickness as well as identifying preventative measures to improve health outcomes.
    • Nature Connections

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (2015-09)
      The highlands are now relatively empty with only about 20% of Scotland’s population living in the region, looking at the bleakness of the landscape it is easy to imagine that this was always the case. However, some of the sites I photograph, Aoneadh Mor for example, were forcibly cleared of their tenant farmers in the nineteenth century to make way for more profitable sheep. The result of these, often brutal, ‘clearances’ was a reduction in the population from about 50% of Scotland’s total to 20%. Mary Cameron's eyewitness account of Aoneadh Mor's forced evictions reached a rapt British readership via the magazine "Good Words", and had an enormous impact on developing unease at what had been done in the name of progress. "The hissing of the fire on the flag of the hearth as they were drowning it reach my heart", she said, "The aged woman, the mother of my husband was then alive, weak and lame. James carried her on his back, in a creel." On the ridge of Sithean na Raiplach, refugees destined for Glasgow and the colonies turned for a last look. "The houses were already stripped. The bleat of the big sheep was on the mountain." Aoneadh Mor, the village of the Cameron highlanders, was cleared to make way for sheep.