• Masters with a purpose: summary report

      Artess, Jane; Ball, Charlie; Forbes, Peter; Hughes, Tristram; HECSU (Universities UK, 2014-05)
      This report documents and explores higher education institutions' engagement with employers in respect of postgraduate taught Masters courses. Findings suggest that there might be better outcomes for graduates and employers where Masters study is approached in a 'purposeful' way.
    • Matches.

      O'Connor, Sean; McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Newstalk 106-108FM, 21/03/2015)
      Matches is the story of Tom, a recovering alcoholic looking for love in a world of dating apps, social media and the ever-present lure of alcohol. Exploring this mysterious sub-culture, Tom discovers some of the thrills and pitfalls of the modern dating scene. Tom Brody is a Dublin man in his late-thirties recovering from alcoholism. Tom's recent sobriety has brought many improvements. He is happier, healthier and getting on better with his family. The one area he finds more difficult is dating. Without the reliable meeting place of the pub, Tom finds meeting women more complicated than ever in a social scene still dominated by drinking. Furthermore, without the traditional 'Dutch courage', Tom feels more than a little awkward approaching the opposite sex sober. A friend introduces Tom to Quiver, the latest dating app for everything from lifetime relationships to random hookups. Along the way he conquers his awkwardness with social media and discovers some strange rules and peculiarities of the online dating world. Tom's initial success on the single scene pushes him to take ever greater risks with his sobriety as he encounters the pitfalls of keeping his history a secret. Ultimately Tom learns that being honest with himself is as important as being honest with others and that meeting his ideal match is about more than a perfect dating profile.
    • Maths mastery: The key to pedagogical liberation?

      Benson, David; University of Derby (Association of Teachers of Mathematics, 2016-12-20)
    • Matrimony, The Fall and A Moment in Time.

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2018-01)
      Drawings inspired by the nomadic German artist Martin Kippenberger’s Hotel Drawings and created for the Art on Hotel Note Paper exhibition, Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe,Lincolnshire.
    • Maximising the impact of careers services on career management skills: a review of the literature

      Mackay, Susan; Morris, Marian; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      The review identified an international body of work on the development and implementation of competency frameworks in reaction to CMS, including the ‘Blueprint’ frameworks, which are a series of inter-related national approaches to career management skills (originating in the USA and taken up subsequently, and with different emphases, by Canada, Australia, England and Scotland). There is, as yet, little empirical evidence to support the overall efficacy of CMS frameworks, but they have the advantage of setting out what needs to be learned (usually as a clear and identifiable list of skills, attributes and attitudes) and, often, how this learning is intended to happen. The international literature emphasised the iterative nature and mixture of formal and informal learning and life experiences that people needed to develop CMS. It suggested that, though there was no single intervention or group of interventions that appeared most effective in increasing CMS, there were five underpinning components of career guidance interventions that substantially increased effectiveness, particularly when combined. These included the use of narrative/writing approaches; the importance of providing a ‘safe’ environment; the quality of the adviser-client relationship; the need for flexibility in approach; the provision of specialist information and support; and clarity on the purpose and aims of action planning. The review also identified a possible emergent hierarchy around the efficacy of different modes of delivery of career guidance interventions on CMS development. Interventions involving practitioner contact and structured groups appeared more effective than self-directed interventions or unstructured groups. Computer-based interventions were found to work better when practitioner input was provided during the intervention or when they were followed up by a structured workshop session to discuss and review the results.
    • The McDonaldization of higher education

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; Mandal, Luna; University of Derby (2017-07-12)
      2017 saw the publication of 'Beyond McDonaldization: Visions of Higher Education' (Routledge), the first chapter of which, 'Beyond the McDonaldization of Higher Education', develops and updates the ideas in this paper, which is an edited and revised version of the 'Introduction' to Dennis Hayes and Robin Wynyard’s book 'The McDonaldization of Higher Education' (Bergin and Garvey 2002). This well-received book introduced, and presented some criticisms of, the concept of 'McDonaldization' and examined the consequences of the process of McDonaldization to the university. A notable idea in the 2002 book was the concept of the 'therapeutic university' which, in part, explained the acquiescence of academics and students to the bureaucratising aspects of McDonaldization. The term is now widely used to describe a cultural climate in universities that sees today’s students as emotionally vulnerable and incapable of coping with challenging ideas.
    • The McDonaldization of higher education revisited.

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-06-02)
      Since The McDonaldization of Higher Education was published in 2002 the McDonaldizing processes of efficiency, predictability, reliability and control seem to have come to dominate universities throughout the world through turning students into consumers who buy degrees made up of bite-sized, credit-rated modules, subjecting universities to the requirements of national and global league tables and re-constructing lecturers as facilitators of the ‘student experience’. The success of university management in restructuring universities as McBusinesses is premised on a seeming contradiction. As universities have been McDonaldized they have spontaneously embraced therapy culture and have become therapeutic universities. The therapeutic approach towards students adopted by management was supported by academics who failed to see or challenge the new student-centred culture. Therapy Culture was not contradictory but complementary to the ruthless McDonaldization of universities. Discussions of the marketization and bureaucratization of higher education have been ineffectual in terms of understanding the importance of the therapeutic turn and therefore have not been able to cohere any effective resistance to McDonaldization. Taking our previous work forward, we examine the ineluctable connection between the forces leading to McDonaldization and the therapeutic turn and how they are leading to the McDonaldization of the student soul.
    • Measure learner performance on a scale of 1 to 10

      Walker, Ben; Stalk, Andrew; University of Lincoln (2015)
    • The media, ethnicity and religion as determinants of failed republics in Nigeria

      Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby; Benson Idahosa University (Delmas Communications Ltd, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria, 2010-10)
      This paper analyses the covert influence of ethnicity and religion on the media and voting in Nigerian elections and demonstrates how previous Nigerian republics have been hindered because of the impact of ethnic disservice and election crises, thereby providing opportunities for the military to topple each of those failed civilian administrations. Unfortunately, the press could not play a meaningful role in the 1964/65 election crises because the leaders of the factional groups in those conflicts were equally the owners of the early newspapers. So, they simply converted their papers into channels for fighting wars of personal vendetta. In fact, ethnic rivalry and religious intolerance are today the two major sources of conflict in Nigerian politics. For these reasons the paper advises the media to avoid playing the role of an advocate in the support of individuals and governmental agencies as well as ethnic nationality whose aims and objectives are inimical to the national interest and religious tolerance among the Nigerian public.
    • Medical Ephemera; A series of six screen-printed illustrations

      McNaney, Nicki; Allanson-Smith, Tracy; University of Derby (2015-03)
    • The mental health needs of refugee pupils.

      Hewitt, Shirley; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
    • Mermaids are always welcome

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (The Tetley, 2017-03)
      Screen-printed Artists Book exhibited at the Contemporary Artists’ PAGES, Book Fair, The Tetley, Leeds.
    • Migration and mobility in childhood (Mexico).

      Mancillas Bazan, Celia; Figueroa Diaz, Maria Elena; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • "Mild health I seek thee": Clare and Bloomfield at the limits of pastoral

      Lafford, Erin; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020)
      In The Country and the City (1973), Raymond Williams dismantled the “pastoral assumption” that the rural laboring class were pictures of health and vitality, uncovering instead the reality of embodied suffering in laboring-class poetry. This essay considers how Robert Bloomfield and John Clare interrogated this “pastoral assumption” of rural health, suggesting that to claim they merely rejected it risks losing sight of their subtle forms of poetic critique. The body, mind, and verse of laboring-class poets were subject to simultaneous cultural narratives of robust health and sickly weakness, within which Bloomfield and Clare had to forge their own distinctive poetic voices. They wrote poems, I argue, that ostensibly upheld a pastoral ideal of health emanating from the natural world, but also critiqued this ideal through an artful hesitancy, especially in their use of apostrophe. I consider the influence of Bloomfield’s “To My Old Oak Table” (1806), and “Shooter’s Hill” (1806) on Clare’s early poem “To Health” (1821) and one of his middle-period sonnets in particular. Far from being uncomfortable or under-confident in the pastoral mode, Bloomfield and Clare brought their own aesthetic experiments and experiences of precarious health to bear on some of its key tropes.
    • A Mixed History: Colliding Realities and the Hybrid Aesthetic

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (31/05/2016)
      With reference to historiography, the paper will ask how found footage can be manipulated to create alternate histories that challenge orthodox, ‘grand’ narratives within a hybrid aesthetic that foregrounds the diversity of its components, producing deliberate stylistic and ontological discontinuities. The practice echoes the ubiquity and malleability of video material in contemporary communications and media and examines the reliability and authenticity of the video image as a historical document. The work interrogates appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses.
    • More morphostasis than morphogenesis? The ‘dual professionalism’ of English Further Education workshop tutors

      Esmond, Bill; Wood, Hayley; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-03-27)
      An international repositioning of vocational teachers in relation to knowledge and the workplace is reflected in English Further Education through the terminology of ‘dual professionalism’. Particularly in settings most closely linked to specific occupations, this discourse privileges occupational expertise that vocational educators bring from their former employment alongside pedagogic expectations of the teaching role. In a qualitative study of recently qualified teachers employed substantially in workshop settings, using the analytical framework of Margaret Archer, workplace skills and generic attributes provided a basis for claims to expertise, extending to a custodianship of former occupations. Further augmentation of educator roles, however, appeared constrained by market approaches to development and employment insecurity in the sector and beyond. In Archer’s terms, the current environment appears to cast ‘dual professionalism’ as morphostasis, drawing on former practice at the expense of teacher identity in the face of insecurity. Morphogenesis into enhanced professional teacher identities, for example, developing coherent vocational pedagogies informed by research into advances in knowledge, appears the less likely outcome in the current and emerging sector.
    • Moving Landscapes

      Andrews-Roberts, Chas; Squires, Barry; University of Derby (2016)
      Moving Landscapes – breaking away from the traditional ‘landscape stills’, using moving-image & sound. Exhibition / Installation type work. In addition, the potential use of Olfactics (sense of smell) within the installation. How might the use of moving-image / sound / smell, extend the static photographic form? How can the spectator interact with the exhibit? Interested in investigating if the viewer’s physiological state changes in any way whilst viewing / interacting with the work (blood pressure etc), and to see if the work provokes a sense of relaxation.
    • Music as artificial environment: Spatial, embodied multimodal experience

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 26/04/2017)
      This chapter is a speculative exploration of the near-future possibilities of spatial music. Technologically, we can control many hundreds of loudspeakers and, conceivably, many thousands. What would we do with them? Here, music is considered as a particular example of arti cial information environments, with consequences for the perception of space. Arti cial information environments are those environments in which information transactions are governed by design. The distinction is clear in comparison with natural environments, but a ner distinction can be drawn between man-made environments (such as buildings), where some information transactions are haphazard, and information environments whose main purpose is to display information.