• Literature 1780–1830: The Romantic Period

      Branagh-miscampbell, Maxine; O’Brien, Eliza; Ward, Matthew; Whickman, Paul; Dennis, Chrisy; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2016-03-10)
      This chapter has four sections: 1. General and Prose; 2. The Novel; 3. Poetry; 4. Drama. Section 1 is by Maxine Branagh-Miscampbell; section 2 is by Eliza O’Brien; section 3 is by Matthew Ward and Paul Whickman; section 4 is by Chrisy Dennis.
    • Literature 1780–1830: The Romantic Period.

      Branagh-miscampbell, Maxine; Leonardi, Barbara; Whickman, Paul; Ward, Matthew; Miranda, Omar F.; University of Stirling; University of Derby; University of St Andrews; University of San Francisco (Oxford University Press, 2017-04-30)
      This chapter has four sections: 1. General and Prose; 2. The Novel; 3. Poetry; 4. Drama. Section 1 is by Maxine Branagh-Miscampbell; section 2 is by Barbara Leonardi; section 3 is by Matthew Ward and Paul Whickman; section 4 is by Omar F. Miranda.
    • Literature 1780–1830: the Romantic Period.

      Branagh-Miscampbell, Maxine; Leonardi, Barbara; Whickman, Paul; Ward, Matthew; Halsey, Katie; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2018-10-29)
    • Lived spaces and planning anarchy: Theory and practice of Colin Ward.

      Crouch, David; University of Derby; Humanities Department, University of Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-10-11)
    • The long commute

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2015-11)
      The Long Commute , is a screen-printed illustration submitted for the,‘Tales of the City' Cheltenham Illustration Awards, University of Gloucestershire. This work was inspired by the journey taken each morning from the country to the city and the differing experiences encountered along the way.
    • Looking to the future: Framing the implementation of interprofessional education and practice with scenario planning

      Forman, Dawn; Nicol, Pam; Nicol, Paul; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2015-12)
      Background: Adapting to interprofessional education and practice requires a change of perspective for many health professionals. We aimed to explore the potential of scenario planning to bridge the understanding gap and framing strategic planning for interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP), as well as to implement innovative techniques and technology for large‑group scenario planning. Methods: A full‑day scenario planning workshop incorporating innovative methodology was designed and offered to participants. The 71 participants included academics from nine universities, as well as service providers, government, students and consumer organisations. The outcomes were evaluated by statistical and thematic analysis of a mixed method survey questionnaire. Results: The scenario planning method resulted in a positive response as a means of collaboratively exploring current knowledge and broadening entrenched attitudes. It was perceived to be an effective instrument for framing strategy for the implementation of IPE/IPP, with 81 percent of respondents to a post‑workshop survey indicating they would consider using scenario planning in their own organisations. Discussion: The scenario planning method can be used by tertiary academic institutions as a strategy in developing, implementing and embedding IPE, and for the enculturation of IPP in practice settings.
    • Losing people: a linguistic analysis of minimisation in First World War soldiers’ accounts of violence

      Penry Williams, Cara; ; Rice-Whetton, John; La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia); University of Derby; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (Palgrave, 2019-10-05)
      This chapter examines the First World War letters and diaries of Australian soldiers for insights into the relationships between language and violence, focusing on accounts of violent actions and the deaths these caused. Analysis from a corpus of writings from 22 soldiers demonstrates around two-thirds of accounts utilise linguistic resources to minimise or downplay the realities of violence. Two main approaches are generally used: figurative language (euphemism and metaphor) and language that downplays human involvement (passive voice, simplified register, nominalisation/light verb constructions, and the use of inanimate nouns in place of people involved). Our exemplification and analysis of these strategies provides insight into both soldiers’ experiences of violence and death and how they made sense of these experiences. The chapter thus adds to the understanding of First World War vernacular writing, contributes to existing scholarship by using a linguistic method of analysis, and more broadly considers the way violence is discussed.
    • Luddite Drawings: a series of drawings (3) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘From Here & There: drawings from Colorado and Wales.

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-09)
      Luddite Drawings is a series of three A1 drawings made with pencil and carbon paper and using guides made in Adobe Indesign. Each drawing consist of two sets of closely aligned lines that cross each other at right angles. Luddite Drawings explores ideas around drawing, work, craft, repetition, copying and the presence and performance of the body in the drawing process. In making the drawings I set myself rules that I could not meet. I devised a game that pitched the production of the drawing against factors like tiredness, concentration, measurement and correctness. My methodology was guided by Marina Warner’s writing about play and the haptic qualities of making and experiential learning, David Pye’s theory of ‘the workmanship of risk and the workmanship of certainty’ and Tim Inglold’s notions of Wayfaring and Transport. The completed drawings were digitised and printed as A2 Giclée prints for the exhibition From Here and There: Drawings from Colorado and Wales. The exhibition was part of an international exchange of contemporary drawings between artists in Colorado and Wales. Exhibition catalogue available.
    • Lusitania: Beneath the surface.

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Radio Kerry, 2014-12)
      After the RMS Lusitania is sunk by a German U-boat off the south-west coast of Ireland in 1915 the people of the Blasket Islands in Co Kerry rallied to save as many souls as possible and nurse them back to health. This is the story of how one of those survivors unsettles the peaceful islands as his dark past is quickly catching up with him after an investigation is launched into the sinking.
    • The Macaroni's ‘Ambrosial Essences’: Perfume, identity and public space in Eighteenth-Century England.

      Tullett, William; University of Derby (Wiley, 2015-04-22)
      The male antitype of the macaroni and the space of the pleasure gardens in which he reputedly existed have been primarily understood in terms of vision. This article seeks to re‐integrate other senses, particularly olfaction, into our understanding of these subjects. Sounds and smells, of individuals and urban spaces, undermined the idea of the pleasure garden as an enclosed space and the cultivation of the senses it attempted to encourage. The macaroni and his perfumes were an extreme example of this, linking the pleasure garden to the perfumer's shop and disrupting understandings of bodily comportment, masculinity and the proper use of the senses.
    • Making a little difference for early childhood studies students

      Oates, Ruby; Sanders, Andrew; Hey, Christine; White, Jon; Wood, Val; Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2009)
    • Making a rock

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (N/A, 16/03/2016)
      This collaborative project with Caroline Locke and Debra Swann was developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer Lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition at The Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium in 2016 and then developed further as part of an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017. Making a Rock is an ongoing durational performance that attends to the physical construction of a large-scale object (a cardboard ‘rock’) embracing the potential of duration, temporality, liveness and performativity. Using photography, video and sound to document this process of making, the enquiry expands the vocabulary of sculptural practice through the focus of the durational aspects of making and the idea of the sculptural work in flux. This enquiry explores the process of making and collecting data. It investigates how we understand objects and sound and the properties and qualities they possess. Through the artist/object relationship a focus on the evolution of an object and the artist’s process is examined. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The artists have explored the different kinds of data gathered from their combined artistic practices. They extract the data and rework it in live performances and exhibited works. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity. The composition is cut onto a vinyl record which is played over and over within the exhibition space. The sound of the activity becomes abstract and otherworldly when amplified. Mundane working involves repetition – a strange rhythm develops – a kind of chant.
    • Making everyday meanings visible- investigating the use of multimodal map texts to articulate young children’s perspectives

      Gowers, Sophia Jane; University of Derby (Sage, 2021-12-08)
      The use of multimodal approaches to articulate young children’s perspectives are evident in a wide range of recent research. This paper explores the creation of multimodal map-texts as a strategy to engage with young children and articulate their perspectives. It describes the development of a flexible map-based approach that was used in home, early years and community settings with children aged four to five years in England. Illustrative examples are included in which children represented and shared their views on the image-based texts they encountered within their everyday lives through the creation of a multimodal map-text. In this approach to research, children are viewed as competent message creators whose engagements encompass a range of modes and media. Consideration was given to young children’s multimodal meaning-making practices throughout the act of mapping, as well as the resulting text. Taking this approach revealed knowledge, perspectives and contextual information which may otherwise have been overlooked. The paper concludes by identifying the contribution that children’s map-texts can make when building a picture of young children’s experiences, and appraises the advantages and limitations of map-making as a strategy for engaging with young children in research.
    • Making meaning and meaning making: memory, postmemory and narrative in Holocaust literature

      Flower, Annie; University of Derby (2013)
      This paper explores links between narration and memory in Holocaust literature and examines ways in which individuals construct memory and postmemory. Based on the premise that ‘All authors mediate reality through their writing...’ and taking into consideration that what we remember and how we remember is likely to have a significant impact on the narratives that we construct, this article considers the reliability of memory. It argues that whilst there is, at times, a blurring of boundaries between fact and fiction in Holocaust literature, this has little or no impact on the validity and authenticity of the narratives. In an attempt to address these issues more fully, this paper explores the notions of making meaning and meaning making, whilst considering the effects of positionality, time and trauma on memory. Key texts referred to in this discussion include Night (1958) by Elie Wiesel, All Rivers Run to the Sea (1996) by Elie Wiesel, In My Brother’s Shadow (2005) by Uwe Timm and The Dark Room (2001) by Rachel Seiffert. These texts have been chosen in order to highlight the subjectivity of memory and postmemory and to demonstrate the role that narrative plays in their construction and representation.
    • Making shaking shifting pouring sawing

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp; The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Primary Studios Nottingham, 2017-02)
      Making Shaking Shifting Pouring Sawing is an installation, exhibition and live Performance. The work explores the idea of repeated and intensive labour and the data gathered in relation to artistic and domestic processes. The exhibits and performances feature made and found objects and the data collected in relation to repeated activities whilst making or working with the objects. The data is retrieved as sound, physical data, digital imagery and animation. These elements are exposed as part of live performances and exhibited kinetic sculptures and devices. The project involved collaborative research explored by Caroline Locke and Debra Swann and was initially developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collectiv National, Antwerp Gallery in 2016 (Collectiv National, was founded by Janna Beck and is linked to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium). An exhibition and live performance at Primary, Nottingham followed in 2017. As an extension of Locke’s residency at Nottingham University, based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute, Locke and Swann worked with Assistant Professor Max Wilson and Horia Maior, who equipped Debra with a brain scanning device known as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative making processes. Visualisations of the recorded brain data were projected as part of a live performance and exhibition. The brain data was also used to control various devices as part of the exhibition. For example: a motor uses the rate of brain activity to speed up and slow down a record deck. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The ‘music’ was cut onto a vinyl disc and played on the brain data controlled device. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity – The brain effort during the making activity controls the speed at which the record plays during the performances and exhibitions. Shaking Shelves is a kinetic sculpture which is also part of the live performance and exhibition. The brain effort during a cleaning and sweeping process controls the speed at which the motor attached to a shelving unit spins. The shelves are loaded with domestic items and the vibration and movement of the motor causes the shelves to vibrate and the items to shake and sometimes fall. The extended Performing Data research is funded by the Arts Council and explores ideas around body rhythms and physical data in connection with labour, multi-tasking and women's work. Locke is interested in capturing data and using it to control kinetic sculptures within an immersive environment.
    • ‘Making voices heard …’: index on censorship as advocacy journalism

      Steel, John; University of Sheffield (Sage, 2018-03-14)
      The magazine Index on Censorship has sought, since its launch in 1972, to provide a space where censorship and abuses against freedom of expression have been identified, highlighted and challenged. Originally set up by a collection of writers and intellectuals who were concerned at the levels of state censorship and repression of artists in and under the influence of the Soviet Union and elsewhere, ‘Index’ has provided those championing the values of freedom of expression with a platform for highlighting human rights abuses, curtailment of civil liberties and formal and informal censorship globally. Charting its inception and development between 1971 and 1974, the article is the first to situate the journal within the specific academic literature on activist media. In doing so, the article advances an argument which draws on the drivers and motivations behind the publication’s launch to signal the development of a particular justification or ‘advocacy’ of a left-libertarian civic model of freedom of speech.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (09/09/2011)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence – an artist’s statement

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (University of Salford Press, 2012)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.
    • Mapping young children’s conceptualisations of the images they encounter in their familiar environments

      Gowers, Sophia; University of Leicester (SAGE Publications, 2020-04-19)
      This article examines young children’s conceptualisation of the images they encounter within the familiar environments of the home and community settings, focusing on case study data from two, 4-year-old children. The data discussed are taken from a study involving a group of children aged 4–5 years. A participatory mapping approach was adopted, enabling children to be positioned as both message creators, through the production of their multimodal map texts, and message receivers as they sought to make meaning with the image-based texts they encountered within their environments. The use of a mapping activity supported identification of the children’s knowledge of different texts which may not so easily be put into words. The study revealed that, for children, the context and location of images are important, with the presence of images and artefacts enabling familiarity with a place. Furthermore, movement was identified as an intrinsic part of their multimodal engagements. Adopting a social semiotics theoretical framework, this study aims to explore the ways in which young children conceptualise images in their environment. This paper emphasises the need to take account of the embodied, spatial and multimodal nature of making practices, given the importance placed on these by young children themselves.
    • Marion Adnams and the Margins of Surrealism

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2021-06-10)