• Attributes of effective interprofessional placement facilitation

      Nicol, Paul; Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing Press, 2014-10)
      Background: The quality of facilitation is an important influence on the efficacy of interprofessional education (IPE) delivery. The research objective was to increase understanding of the attributes of effective facilitation of students during external IPE placements in primary care situations. Methods and Findings: A thematic analysis of the experiences of academics, students, and placement-site staff at three placement sites was employed to explore participants’ perceptions of the attributes of effective IPE facilitators. These attributes included experience in an interprofessional context, together with an understanding of the specific clinical and assessment requirements of different disciplines. Facilitators also needed empathy with respect to the requirements of the external IPE placement sites and the ability to liaise between student and site needs. Conclusions: Models of IPE placement facilitation were most effective when, while following general principles, facilitators tailored them specifically for the individual situations of the placement sites and the learning requirements of particular groups of students. The most rewarding IPE learning experiences occurred when IPE facilitators provided sufficient clinical opportunities for students to work collaboratively with individual clients, provided the students perceived that their participation was relevant to their own discipline.
    • Audio-tactile multimodal perception of tissue-conducted sound fields

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; University of Derby (26/05/2017)
      Approximately 5% of the World’s population, that is, 360 million people, suffer from “disabling hearing loss” and the proportion of over-65s rises to about 33%. 13.4% of geriatric patients have significant conductive components to their hearing loss. For this segment of the population, “music deprivation” may have significant long-term health and wellbeing consequences amounting to diminished quality of life (QoL). Assistive technologies implementing sensory augmentation could ameliorate the effects of lack of ready access to music, the experiential attributes of music listening can be reinstated and tangible benefits might accrue.
    • Be your dog

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (KARST Gallery, Plymouth, 06/11/2016)
      In partnership with the Live Art Development Agency, 'Be Your Dog' is a project that aims to transcend the hierarchies of pet and owner. The project sees humans and their dogs aim to demonstrate a connection with each other based on mirrored actions that demonstrate empathy and equality. This public event is a result of workshops, and you may see pairs sitting or laying together, looking in each others eyes, or involved in small reciprocal actions. Of course this might not happen, as all are collaborators and the dogs will bring their own contribution to the work, but whatever happens you will see collaborating pairs being responsive in whatever way they deem right.
    • Be/come closer to home: Narratives of contested lands in the visual practices of Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 27/05/2016)
      Women from Cyprus and Palestine are citizens of divided countries and have experienced conspiracies and invasions that have confiscated their homelands. This article investigates visual practices of women artists and the ways in which they are embedded in the space of each location. It aims to reflect on artists' experiences of borders, location and narrations of homeland. It focuses on the artistic practices of Greek-Cypriot artist Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal, who engage in questioning and challenging issues on homeland, borders, history, citizenship, identity and exile. This article will enquire as to how the idea of homeland 'real or imagined' is represented in visual works and will investigate how the usage of images and narratives can challenge the concept of home. Through the discussion of images this article will consider how these practices serve as a reminder of exile and develop a critical understanding of contemporary events and our reaction to them.
    • The beating heart of the system: the health of postal workers in Victorian London

      Brown, Douglas; Green, David; McIlvenna, Kathleen; Shelton, Nicola; Kingston University; Kings College, London; University of Derby; University College London (Elsevier, 2020-05-10)
      In the later decades of the nineteenth century, the United Kingdom experienced a shift in the causes of mortality, from infectious diseases to those more associated with ageing. This epidemiological transition from acute to chronic conditions was accompanied by an increase in longevity and a corresponding increase in morbidity, measured by rising rates of sickness absence. As longevity improved, the period between the onset of ill health and death lengthened. If we are to understand the daily lived experiences of health in different places during the epidemiological transition, it is necessary to explore the complex causes of morbidity rather than just focus on mortality. We argue that other reasons need to be considered alongside age as important influences on the incidence and duration of ill health, including urbanisation, occupational risks and cultural and institutional factors. Using evidence drawn from a sample of pension records of postal workers, we examine a variety of different factors that could have accounted for the changing pattern of morbidity observed in other studies. We conclude that age alone cannot account for the greater incidence of sickness absence and ill health and that other factors relating to the residential and working environment, as well as institutional arrangements for sick pay, need to be taken into account.
    • Becoming an outstanding personal tutor: supporting learners through personal tutoring and coaching

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (Critical publishing, 2015-10-21)
      How confident do you feel in your personal tutoring role? In the face of ever-increasing and demanding learner issues, do you feel equipped to provide the essential support to meet their needs? This timely book provides you with essential help in an area which has often been given little attention in comparison with curriculum delivery by contextualising the support side of a teacher’s role within further education; looking beyond conventional notions of personal tutoring and coaching; appreciating the real world applications of issues; recognising the benefits personal tutoring and coaching bring to learners and educational institutions and reflecting on a variety of different approaches to support learners’ achievement as well as positively affecting institutional key performance indicators. It provides proven practical advice and guidance for planning and delivering group tutorials, undertaking one to ones, identifying and managing vulnerable learners and those at risk of not achieving, as well as helping learners to progress onto their chosen career paths. It explores methods to engage the most disaffected and hard to reach learners, as well as stretching and challenging the more able. It includes clear aims, detailed case studies, learning checklists and a unique self-assessment system for the reader and the educational institution. The text is an excellent foundation for the majority of modules on teacher training qualifications and is relevant to any pre-service or in-service trainee teacher or existing practitioner with a personal tutoring role, a specialised personal tutor, manager or anyone in a learner-facing role within further education.
    • Behaviour in schools – is it as bad as they say – or is it worse?

      Davey, Ang; University of Derby (2016-08)
      This chapter will explore a range of sources that inform the government, the public and schools; what constitutes inappropriate behaviour in schools and the range, and scale of, the perceived problem around poor behaviour in schools. The chapter charts 35 years of insights into the nature of behaviour in schools from the Elton Report (1989) to the Ofsted Report (2014), and considers whether the problem of inappropriate behaviour has changed for the better or worse – or indeed not changed at all. The chapter considers why the issue is deemed important, again by drawing on a range of government and academic reports. Finally, Haydn (2014) adds the learner voice to the discussion.
    • The benefits of an arts education

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (University of Derby, 06/12/2017)
      Latest reports suggest the creative industries are under pressure and question whether they can provide a useful education to young people. David McGravie, Head of the School of Arts at the University of Derby explains why an arts education is important and how it can benefit students
    • Between excess and subtraction: Scenographic violence in Howard Barker’s Found in the Ground

      Kipp, Lara Maleen; University of Derby (Centre de recherche VALE, 23/06/2017)
      The article examines the violence produced by the scenography of Howard Barker's Found in the Ground, which emerges out of the play’s formal experimentation. Thematically, the play is rife with violence, such as former Nuremberg judge Toonelhuis’ consumption of the remains of high-ranking Nazis he sentenced to death, the continuous burning of books and the retelling of various murders by the war criminal Knox. Found in the Ground re-visions the collective European memory of the Holocaust; this thematic violence is expanded and subverted by scenographic means, radically reimagining the historical context. The particularity of the spatio-temporal, audio-visual rendering of violence in Barker’s text is the focus of this article. The article relates the play to Artaud’s conception of cruelty and to Lyotard’s thinking on the sublime. It contextualises the play through Barker’s theoretical writings, Lingis’ notion of catastrophic time (2000) and Aronson’s proposition of the stage as an abyss (2005).
    • Beyond comparative institutional analysis: a workplace turn in English TVET

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Vocational Education and Training Network (VETNET), 2018-09-04)
      Vocational education analyses often compare national patterns seen to favour industry-based training, state schooling or personal investment in skills acquisition: these are increasingly offered as ‘templates’ to new and established industrial economies. Institutionalist scholarship has correspondingly foregrounded skill formation as key to national policy differences; in particular historical institutionalism has focused on the role of labour market and state actors in negotiating and contesting arrangements for skill formation. Whilst paying relatively little direct attention to educational practice, these approaches provide theoretical tools to understand policy differences and to identify possibilities, limitations and strategies for change. This paper draws on their application in England, where apprenticeship and technical education reforms are periodically represented as relocating skills formation to the point of production on the model of collectivist systems: case study data is examined for evidence of institutional change strategies within emerging educational practices. Whilst the absence of engaged labour market actors renders the adoption of a substantially different model improbable, contestation over knowledge, control and educational roles is nevertheless evident, indicating the deployment of strategies for significant change. Their outcomes will determine the availability of transitions, with a layering of selective opportunities threatening to diminish the opportunities available to others.
    • Beyond McDonaldization: visions of higher education

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017)
      Beyond McDonaldization provides new concepts of higher education for the twenty-first century in a unique manner, challenging much that is written in mainstream texts. This book undertakes a reassessment of the growth of McDonaldization in higher education by exploring how the application of Ritzer’s four features efficiency, predictability, calculability and control has become commonplace. This wide-ranging text discusses arguments surrounding the industrialisation of higher education, with case studies and contributions from a wide range of international authors. Written in an accessible style, Beyond McDonaldization examines questions such as: •Can we regain academic freedom whilst challenging the McDonaldization of thought and ideas? •Is a McDonaldization of every aspect of academic life inevitable? •Will the new focus on student experience damage young people? •Why is a McDonaldized education living on borrowed time? •Is it possible to recreate the university of the past or must we start anew? •Does this industrialisation meet the educational needs of developing economies? This book brings international discussions on the changing world of higher education and the theory of McDonaldization together, seeking to provide a positive future vision of higher education. Analysing and situating the discussion of higher education within a wider social, political and cultural context, this ground-breaking text will have a popular appeal with students, academics and educationalists.
    • Beyond the therapeutic university

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-04)
      Dennis Hayes, who coined the term 'therapeutic university’, sets out the conditions for its demise and argues for the 'Socratic University'.
    • BFMAF – Border Crossing

      Davies, Huw; Iredale, Melanie; University of Derby (Arts Council England, 2014-09)
      The 10th edition of the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival (BFMAF) ‘Border Crossing’ (September 2014) explored border identities and the crossing and transcending of global boundaries against the background of the 2014 Scottish Independence Referendum. The research contribution of Davies relates to the curation of the Artists’ Trail / Installations; a promenade exhibition of artists’ film and video contextualised by publication which links together a number of different site-specific architectural locations within the Elizabethan Ramparts. The 2014 edition featured the work of 47 artists and filmmakers from 17 different countries and included 16 UK premiers and 6 specifically commissioned works. The commissions (selected from an international call) provide the opportunity for the creation of original new works as a response to the Festival theme and environmental location. The audience attendance was 9450.
    • BFMAF – Fact or Fiction

      Davies, Huw; Taylor, Peter; University of Derby (Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival, 2015-09)
      The 11th edition of the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival (BFMAF), ‘Fact or Fiction’ (September 2015) questioned the ambiguous relationships between fact and fantasy, documentary and narrative and reality and myth. The research contribution of Davies relates to the curation of the Artists’ Trail / Installations; a promenade exhibition of artists’ film and video contextualised by publication which links together a number of different site-specific architectural locations within the Elizabethan Ramparts. The 2015 edition featured the work of 40 artists and filmmakers from 20 different countries and included 12 UK premiers and 4 specifically commissioned works. The commissions (selected from an international call) provide the opportunity for the creation of original new works as a response to the Festival theme and environmental location. The audience attendance was 8910
    • The big picture

      Wilson, Colin; University of Derby (2014-01)
      To look at the Big Picture is an act of becoming involved, emotionally, physically and intellectually. To see the Big Picture is to see the complexity of relationships in everyday lived experience. In a world of small-minded, superficial, self-interested individuals, where images become noise, and noise becomes entertainment and distraction, where the shallowness of life coincides with the shallowness of understanding, experience and expectation. The Big Picture proposes a world of depth, a time for reflection a place for change. Alongside the Big Picture are the Big Questions
    • Bilingualism and multilingualism in early childhood education (Mexico).

      Mendoza-Zuany, Rosa Guadalupe; Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby; Universidad Veracruzana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Black libraries

      Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (Candlelight Records, 2015-10)
      Taken from the debut album 'The Calendrical Cycle: Eye of Earth' out now on Candlelight Records.
    • Blasphemy and politics in romantic literature: Creativity in the writing of Percy Bysshe Shelley

      Whickman, Paul; University of Derby (Springer International Publishing, 2020-06-07)
      This book argues for the importance of blasphemy in shaping the literature and readership of Percy Bysshe Shelley and of the Romantic period more broadly. Not only are perceptions of blasphemy taken to be inextricable from politics, this book also argues for blasphemous ‘irreverence’ as both inspiring and necessitating new poetic creativity. The book reveals the intersection of blasphemy, censorship and literary property throughout the ‘Long Eighteenth Century’, attesting to the effect of this connection on Shelley’s poetry more specifically. Paul Whickman notes how Shelley’s perceived blasphemy determined the nature and readership of his published works through censorship and literary piracy. Simultaneously, Whickman crucially shows that aesthetics, content and the printed form of the physical text are interconnected and that Shelley’s political and philosophical views manifest themselves in his writing both formally and thematically.