• Leadership development for interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
      Leadership Development of Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice is an edited compilation of chapters written by international medical and health professional experts. The book provides historical and current perspectives on leadership in healthcare.
    • Leadership in early childhood: Leader's views on their role

      Simmons, Helen; Yates, Ellen (Aberystwyth University, 2014)
      Changes in the sector in relation to the structure of early childhood education and care, and legislation have made leadership a multifaceted and demanding role. Currently there is little training available and limited research (Siraj Blatchford and Manni (2006) and Rodd (1997)). This paper explores leaders views of their role within a range of Early Childhood settings. Research was gathered from Early Childhood Studies students in their final year on the BA (Hons) ECS programme. The research examines how these early years practitioners perceive the practice of leadership and identifies some of the daily realities of leadership. The research explores leaders views on their role including perceived barriers to effective leadership and causes of conflict within teams. Many of the participants find themselves in positions of leadership early in their careers, where their role focuses on managing adults and administrative tasks rather than working with children. Participants expressed frustration in the career path for leaders in early childhood often being based on excellent practice. They also expressed concern over having received little or no training for the leadership roles they find themselves in, which deal with finance, administration and staff issues rather than working with children.
    • Leading research and evaluation in interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
      Expanding upon Leadership Development for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice and Leadership and Collaboration, the third installment to this original and innovative collection of books considers a variety of research models and theories. Emphasizing research and evaluation in leadership aspects, Leading Research and Evaluation in Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice
    • Leading strategic change in arts: twist or bust?

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (27/01/2017)
      Reviewing leadership and management of strategic level operations and change, and will draw on a number of relevant and diverse organization level case studies of change looking at how HEI manage change.
    • “Learning to Walk”: Qing constitutional reform and Britain’s imperial pedagogy, 1901-1911

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-08-07)
      This contribution examines British attitudes towards the Qing government’s efforts at introducing constitutional reform in China during the first decade of the twentieth century. During this period, China gradually introduced elected assemblies as well as a range of other reforms in education, civil service administration, and a number of other fields. The chapter will explore to what extent imperial ambitions shaped British understandings of the changes that occurred in the Qing Empire and whether British observers believed constitutional government would be successful. Judging from Foreign Office and consular reports, British opinion on reforms in China was ambivalent. On the one hand, there was a strong sense that Britain should support efforts at democratization, even if many consular officials believed that optimism about China's path towards constitutional government was misplaced. While there was some support for specific reforms, many observers believed that China lacked capable leaders and that the Chinese people were not truly committed to political change. On the other hand, in the aftermath of the Boxer Rebellion, there was also a growing concern that constitutional government was interwoven with a growing sense of Chinese assertiveness, nationalism, and anti-foreign sentiment. This, British consular staff feared, would endanger British interests in the region and the stability of the British Empire, particularly in regions with a significant overseas Chinese population. The ambivalence contained in this assessment of Chinese reforms was never fully resolved, but its very existence demonstrates the importance which British commentators attached to safeguarding not only Britain’s economic interests but also her status as a global symbol of constitutional government.
    • Left behind.

      O'Connor, Aisling; Clarke, Siobhan; McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Shannonside Northern Sound Radio, 2014-04)
      This production was heavily inspired by the Ann Lovett's story from 1984. Ann was a 15-year-old schoolgirl found dead at a Grotto in Granard, Co Longford in late January with her new born baby by her side. Both died of exposure. This drama suggests what might have happened had a heavily pregnant Ann fled Granard. The play explores the journey her daughter may have taken to uncover her mother's past in a community unwilling to discuss it. The writers were careful not to be overt in their references to the Ann Lovett story as it remains a sensitive subject in the area to this day. This drama is unique because it strives to give young Irish women with unexpected pregnancies a voice in a country where abortion remains illegal. The drama skillfully integrates flashbacks to the 1980s to imagine the struggle and pain Cyndi's mother must have experienced. The radio play was written by Aisling O'Connor (producer) and Siobhan Clarke (director). The production was produced and edited by This production was heavily inspired by the Ann Lovett's story from 1984. Ann was a 15-year-old schoolgirl found dead at a Grotto in Granard, Co Longford in late January with her new born baby by her side. Both died of exposure. This drama suggests what might have happened had a heavily pregnant Ann fled Granard. The play explores the journey her daughter may have taken to uncover her mother's past in a community unwilling to discuss it. The writers were careful not to be overt in their references to the Ann Lovett story as it remains a sensitive subject in the area to this day. This drama is unique because it strives to give young Irish women with unexpected pregnancies a voice in a country where abortion remains illegal. The drama skillfully integrates flashbacks to the 1980s to imagine the struggle and pain Cyndi's mother must have experienced. The radio play was written by Aisling O'Connor (producer) and Siobhan Clarke (director). The production was produced and edited by Daithí McMahon.
    • Letters to the editor: Comparative and historical perspectives

      Steel, John; Cavanagh, Alison; University of Sheffield; University of Leeds (Springer Nature/ Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-10)
      This book provides an account of current work on letters to the editor from a range of different national, cultural, conceptual and methodological perspectives. Letters to the editor provide a window on the reflexive relationship between editorial and readership identities in historical and international contexts. They are a forum through which the personal and the political intersect, a space wherein the implications of contemporaneous events are worked out by citizens and public figures alike, and in which the meaning and significance of unfolding media narratives and events are interpreted and contested. They can also be used to understand the multiple and overlapping ways that particular issues recur over sometimes widely distinct periods. This collection brings together scholars who have helped open up letters to the editor as a resource for scholarship and whose work in this book continues to provide new insights into the relationship between journalism and its publics.
    • Let’s talk about peace over dinner: A cultural experience on memory, dislocation and the politics of belonging in Cyprus.

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Intellect, 2018-04-23)
      On Saturday 9 April 2011, Greek Cypriot artist Lia Lapithi invited a group of eighteen guests to join her for her own version of the Last Supper, a four-course dinner that took place in the warehouse of an old furniture factory in Nicosia, Cyprus. The dinner was the first project of a series of orchestrated meals that Lapithi hosted and participated, where the theme was hospitality and politics in Cyprus.1 Significant to Lapithi’s work are autobiographical experiences and the geopolitical division of Cyprus. Born in 1963 in Cyprus, Lapithi experienced at a young age the traumatic 1974 division of Cyprus and the on-going occupation of half of the island by Turkey.2 This article explores the significance of an orchestrated meal for the politics of belonging and remembering in contemporary Cyprus. It analyses the representation of the event by Lapithi, who engaged in questioning the meaning of peace by serving food as a ‘medium’ and as a ‘symbol of peace’. It also explores Lapithi’s strategies in communicating her own memories and experiences as a refugee who can visit her family’s house over the occupied northern side of Cyprus only as a guest. Through the discussion of food/taste and visuals, this article will consider how the dinner acts as a means of catharsis for the participants and develops a critical understanding of contemporary events in Cyprus and our reaction to them.
    • Life Goes On

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (17/06/2016)
      Digital collage artworks included in group show: Juxtaposition an exhibition of contemporary collage and video art at The Museum of Club Culture, 17th June - July 10th. Curated by Mark Wigan and Kerry Baldry.
    • Like a ghost out of nowhere.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Spirit Duplicator, 2018-06)
      This chapter questions disciplinary voices and explores how researchers have worked with power differentials. The whole book features researchers working across art, architecture, ethnography and creative writing discussing how multiple voices are activated and hosted in their work. Edited by Jon Orlek and designed by Jon Cannon, each copy is unique and contains a performance by Vulpes Vulpes.
    • Limited edition screenprint

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2015-02)
      My work explores themes of humour, word play, narrative and visual storytelling. Focus is on the use of Illustration to explore personal voice and the extent that this can be applied to processes whilst retaining visual identity. I am interested in the process of Illustration and experimentation in various outputs, this is currently leading me into further visual treatment such as 3d laser cut artworks and ceramics.
    • Linguistics for TESOL: theory and practice

      Valenzuela, Hannah; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)
      This textbook proposes a theoretical approach to linguistics in relation to teaching English. Combining research with practical classroom strategies and activities, it aims to satisfy the needs of new and experienced TESOL practitioners, helping them to understand the features of the English language and how those features impact on students in the classroom. The author provides a toolkit of strategies and practical teaching ideas to inspire and support practitioners in the classroom, encouraging reflection through regular stop-and-think tasks, so that practitioners have the opportunity to deepen their understanding and relate it to their own experience and practice. This book will appeal to students and practitioners in the fields of applied linguistics, TESOL, EAL, English language and linguistics, EAP, and business English.
    • Listening to Los Beatles: being young in 1960s Cuba

      Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Indiana University Press, 2013)
    • Literature 1780–1830: The Romantic Period

      Branagh-miscampbell, Maxine; O’Brien, Eliza; Ward, Matthew; Whickman, Paul; Dennis, Chrisy; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2016-03-10)
      This chapter has four sections: 1. General and Prose; 2. The Novel; 3. Poetry; 4. Drama. Section 1 is by Maxine Branagh-Miscampbell; section 2 is by Eliza O’Brien; section 3 is by Matthew Ward and Paul Whickman; section 4 is by Chrisy Dennis.
    • Literature 1780–1830: The Romantic Period.

      Branagh-miscampbell, Maxine; Leonardi, Barbara; Whickman, Paul; Ward, Matthew; Miranda, Omar F.; University of Stirling; University of Derby; University of St Andrews; University of San Francisco (Oxford University Press, 2017-04-30)
      This chapter has four sections: 1. General and Prose; 2. The Novel; 3. Poetry; 4. Drama. Section 1 is by Maxine Branagh-Miscampbell; section 2 is by Barbara Leonardi; section 3 is by Matthew Ward and Paul Whickman; section 4 is by Omar F. Miranda.
    • Literature 1780–1830: the Romantic Period.

      Branagh-Miscampbell, Maxine; Leonardi, Barbara; Whickman, Paul; Ward, Matthew; Halsey, Katie; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2018-10-29)
    • Lived spaces and planning anarchy: Theory and practice of Colin Ward.

      Crouch, David; University of Derby; Humanities Department, University of Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-10-11)
    • The long commute

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2015-11)
      The Long Commute , is a screen-printed illustration submitted for the,‘Tales of the City' Cheltenham Illustration Awards, University of Gloucestershire. This work was inspired by the journey taken each morning from the country to the city and the differing experiences encountered along the way.
    • Looking to the future: Framing the implementation of interprofessional education and practice with scenario planning

      Forman, Dawn; Nicol, Pam; Nicol, Paul; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2015-12)
      Background: Adapting to interprofessional education and practice requires a change of perspective for many health professionals. We aimed to explore the potential of scenario planning to bridge the understanding gap and framing strategic planning for interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP), as well as to implement innovative techniques and technology for large‑group scenario planning. Methods: A full‑day scenario planning workshop incorporating innovative methodology was designed and offered to participants. The 71 participants included academics from nine universities, as well as service providers, government, students and consumer organisations. The outcomes were evaluated by statistical and thematic analysis of a mixed method survey questionnaire. Results: The scenario planning method resulted in a positive response as a means of collaboratively exploring current knowledge and broadening entrenched attitudes. It was perceived to be an effective instrument for framing strategy for the implementation of IPE/IPP, with 81 percent of respondents to a post‑workshop survey indicating they would consider using scenario planning in their own organisations. Discussion: The scenario planning method can be used by tertiary academic institutions as a strategy in developing, implementing and embedding IPE, and for the enculturation of IPP in practice settings.
    • Losing people: a linguistic analysis of minimisation in First World War soldiers’ accounts of violence

      Penry Williams, Cara; ; Rice-Whetton, John; La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia); University of Derby; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (Palgrave, 2019-10-05)
      This chapter examines the First World War letters and diaries of Australian soldiers for insights into the relationships between language and violence, focusing on accounts of violent actions and the deaths these caused. Analysis from a corpus of writings from 22 soldiers demonstrates around two-thirds of accounts utilise linguistic resources to minimise or downplay the realities of violence. Two main approaches are generally used: figurative language (euphemism and metaphor) and language that downplays human involvement (passive voice, simplified register, nominalisation/light verb constructions, and the use of inanimate nouns in place of people involved). Our exemplification and analysis of these strategies provides insight into both soldiers’ experiences of violence and death and how they made sense of these experiences. The chapter thus adds to the understanding of First World War vernacular writing, contributes to existing scholarship by using a linguistic method of analysis, and more broadly considers the way violence is discussed.