• Jonathan Vickers and Kerri Pratt

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (WordPress, 21/07/2014)
      2014 Jonathan Vickers Award winner Kerri Pratt, her work and circumstances relating to the award.
    • The journal of imaginary research. Volume 3.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Guccione, Kay; University of Derby (NATCECT, 2018)
    • Journeys, pathways and track plans

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2014-10)
      Journeys - a 2 week contemporary art exhibition based around the idea of the various forms a journey can take, be that physical, of the mind or imagination. Ecopsychology is a psychological subfield that looks at the relationship between human beings and their environment, embracing a more revolutionary paradigm: just as Freud believed that neuroses were the consequences of dismissing deep rooted sexual and aggressive instincts, eco-psychologists believe that grief, despair and anxiety are the consequences of dismissing equally deep rooted ecological instincts.’ It is this connection between the human psyche and nature that is being explored. ‘In the Drowned World’ a recent series of images taken on walks along the track-bed of a disused railway feature labyrinthine, tangled and sometimes menacing vegetation inspired by the paintings of Max Ernst, alluding to Ballardian themes of nature’s retribution. The large scale image is printed on duratrans mounted on opaque Perspex and fixed to the outside of a window, the impression being of the tangled vegetation viewed through the window.
    • Karl Marx's Capital and transatlantic radical book-trade networks in the early twentieth century

      Feely, Catherine; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017)
      The book trade historically tended to operate in a spirit of co-operation as well as competition. Networks between printers, publishers, booksellers and related trades existed at local, regional, national and international levels and were a vital part of the business of books for several centuries. This collection of essays examines many aspects of the history of book-trade networks, in response to the recent ‘spatial turn’ in history and other disciplines. Contributors come from various backgrounds including history, sociology, business studies and English literature.
    • Karri Pratt: Our treasure houses

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 2015-09)
      Kerri Pratt’s paintings have references to curious spaces derived from man-made, industrial and urban landscapes. Drawing on childhood memories of growing up in an ex-mining town, when the demise of previously thriving industries of Collieries, Potteries, Pipeworks and Brickworks were all too prominent. Kerri has reconnected with her home county of Derbyshire to produce a new series of paintings referencing remnants and traces of our industrial heritage.
    • Kissing women: The fiction of Sarah Waters

      Bishton, Joanne; University of Derby (Lucian Blaga University Press, 2008)
      The lesbian historical novel is a genre that has been consistently neglected. Reasons of censorship and lack of credibility, during an increasingly hostile Victorian era, forced lesbians into exile, denying them their subjectivity and distancing them from any notion of same sex desire. Inevitably, lives have been lost or forgotten as a consequence. Looking at three of Sarah Waters novels, Tipping the Velvet, Affinity and The Fingersmith, this article intends to consider the existence of the marginalized working class lesbian. It hopes to show how a contemporary woman writer successfully exploits the unreliability of history in order to replicate a series of romantic fantasies and in so doing, it will argue that Waters’ fiction makes it possible to envisage lesbian desire beyond the limitations of heterosexual paradigms. Feminist and queer theory engagement with the texts will highlight the way Waters repossesses the desiring lesbian body, examining a series of erotic lesbian portrayals.
    • The kites are flying

      Hunt, Ava; Maggie Ford; University of Derby (2013-05)
      A television reporter’s experience in the West Bank reveals how children’s hopes and dreams for peace can fly higher than any wall dividing communities and religions. Why won’t Said speak? Why does he make beautiful kites and let them loose in the wind? Following actor Ava Hunt and Director Maggie Ford’s recent visit filming in the West Bank, join us for this new one-woman multimedia performance, bringing this beautiful story alive with laughter, thrills and tears to a land where friendship has no barriers.
    • KssssS

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2004)
      a novel
    • Landscape, land and identity: a performative consideration

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2012)
      This chapter considers ideas of land and identity processes through an original consideration of landscape. Following Taussig's argument that cultural meaning and identification are less constituted in institutionalised and ritualised signification than emergent in the performance of life, attention focuses upon the performative character of landscape and its relationality with land and identity.... Making land significant in life is considered through landscape in the notion of spacing. The notion of an everyday, gentle politics is introduced to the constitution of identities and feeling of land. Identities and values concerning land are produced relationally in the energy cracks between performativity and institutions, as the several investigations upon which this chapter draws testify.
    • Language development

      Nahmad-Williams, Lindy; Fenton, Carol; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Laon and Cythna and The Revolt of Islam: revisions as transition.

      Whickman, Paul; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2018-10-16)
      The enforced amendments made to Laon and Cythna following its withdrawal from publication in December 1817 are generally regarded as workmanlike and prudent, sacrificing aesthetic merit in the name of compromise and self-censorship. There remain, however, few detailed readings of these modifications that go beyond subjective responses. To this end, this article offers a reading of these revisions arguing that although some are indeed functional alterations, other amendments serve thematic and aesthetic ends. One of Shelley’s most common changes, that of changing the word ‘God’ to ‘Power’, is a case in point. Since a key theme of the poem is of the collusion between political and religious tyranny, Shelley’s alteration of ‘God’ to ‘Power’ makes this connection more explicit. From this, this article concludes that these revisions signal, analogously at the very least, a transitioning point in Shelley’s thought and career. Whereas Queen Mab (1813) refers explicitly to ‘God’, later works such as Prometheus Unbound (1820) settle upon the term ‘Power’. The fact that we see Shelley move from one to the other between Laon and Cythna and The Revolt of Islam is therefore significant.
    • Layers of meaning, layers of truth: fragmented histories and composited video collage

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (Royal College of Art, 14/05/2016)
      The paper will present a body of ongoing practice-based research that interrogates the interface of live-action and animation, specifically, how found footage as an indexical element of lived experience functions within the aesthetic of a constructed ‘other’ world. Particular focus is given to how video collage, containing found footage components composed in the spatial as well as temporal dimensions, construct non-fiction explorations of the socio-historical world from an ontological perspective. The research explores how found footage elements are deployed to address themes relating to memory and history, with regard to how collective impressions of history are constituted and socially assimilated.
    • Layers, traces and gaps: Collage, found footage and the contested past

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (23/06/2017)
      Critical realism is an anti-reductionist approach that asserts the independence of an external world whilst accepting that knowledge of that world is socially constructed and transient. It offers an intermediate position that reconciles the binary opposition of objectivism and subjectivism, challenging the ‘false choice’ (Lovell, 1981) between empiricist and idealist ontologies. In recognising the dense complexity of being and the social world, it advances a stratified reality comprised of co-dependent structures and mechanisms. The paper will describe a framework for practice research that uses found footage and animated collage within a critical realist methodology. The research deploys strategies that privilege simultaneity, overlap and hybridity in articulating layered temporalities that foreground a dialectical conception of history. The practice explores how critical realist collage can challenge essentialist, unitary historical narratives that suppress the interdependence and complexity of socio-historical phenomena. Can the partial and irregular experience of remembering, evoking the contingent and furtive conditions of personal and collective memory be rendered through the aesthetic of moving collage? In reference to animated documentary, the work investigates how spatial and temporal found footage collage can expand the language of non-fiction films that address memory and the past. The paper will argue that the deeper understanding of memory and history that critical realism offers could be apprehended through the construction and mediation that the vocabularies of animation and collage contain.
    • Leadership and collaboration: Further developments for interprofessional education

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      Leadership and Collaboration provides international examples of how leadership of interprofessional education and practice has developed in various countries and examines how interprofessional education and collaborative practice can make a difference to the care of the patient, client and community.
    • Leadership and management of early years settings.

      Johnston, Chris; Johnston, Jane; House, Angela; Fenton, Carol; University of Plymouth; Bishop Grosseteste University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Leadership development for interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
      Leadership Development of Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice is an edited compilation of chapters written by international medical and health professional experts. The book provides historical and current perspectives on leadership in healthcare.
    • Leadership in early childhood: Leader's views on their role

      Simmons, Helen; Yates, Ellen (Aberystwyth University, 2014)
      Changes in the sector in relation to the structure of early childhood education and care, and legislation have made leadership a multifaceted and demanding role. Currently there is little training available and limited research (Siraj Blatchford and Manni (2006) and Rodd (1997)). This paper explores leaders views of their role within a range of Early Childhood settings. Research was gathered from Early Childhood Studies students in their final year on the BA (Hons) ECS programme. The research examines how these early years practitioners perceive the practice of leadership and identifies some of the daily realities of leadership. The research explores leaders views on their role including perceived barriers to effective leadership and causes of conflict within teams. Many of the participants find themselves in positions of leadership early in their careers, where their role focuses on managing adults and administrative tasks rather than working with children. Participants expressed frustration in the career path for leaders in early childhood often being based on excellent practice. They also expressed concern over having received little or no training for the leadership roles they find themselves in, which deal with finance, administration and staff issues rather than working with children.
    • Leading research and evaluation in interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
      Expanding upon Leadership Development for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice and Leadership and Collaboration, the third installment to this original and innovative collection of books considers a variety of research models and theories. Emphasizing research and evaluation in leadership aspects, Leading Research and Evaluation in Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice
    • Leading strategic change in arts: twist or bust?

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (27/01/2017)
      Reviewing leadership and management of strategic level operations and change, and will draw on a number of relevant and diverse organization level case studies of change looking at how HEI manage change.
    • “Learning to Walk”: Qing constitutional reform and Britain’s imperial pedagogy, 1901-1911

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-08-07)
      This contribution examines British attitudes towards the Qing government’s efforts at introducing constitutional reform in China during the first decade of the twentieth century. During this period, China gradually introduced elected assemblies as well as a range of other reforms in education, civil service administration, and a number of other fields. The chapter will explore to what extent imperial ambitions shaped British understandings of the changes that occurred in the Qing Empire and whether British observers believed constitutional government would be successful. Judging from Foreign Office and consular reports, British opinion on reforms in China was ambivalent. On the one hand, there was a strong sense that Britain should support efforts at democratization, even if many consular officials believed that optimism about China's path towards constitutional government was misplaced. While there was some support for specific reforms, many observers believed that China lacked capable leaders and that the Chinese people were not truly committed to political change. On the other hand, in the aftermath of the Boxer Rebellion, there was also a growing concern that constitutional government was interwoven with a growing sense of Chinese assertiveness, nationalism, and anti-foreign sentiment. This, British consular staff feared, would endanger British interests in the region and the stability of the British Empire, particularly in regions with a significant overseas Chinese population. The ambivalence contained in this assessment of Chinese reforms was never fully resolved, but its very existence demonstrates the importance which British commentators attached to safeguarding not only Britain’s economic interests but also her status as a global symbol of constitutional government.