• Investigating spatial music qualia through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; University of Derby (Aalto University, 2017-07)
      A spatial array of vibro-mechanical transducers for bone-and-tissue conduction has been used to convey spatial ambisonic soundscape and spatial musical material. One hundred volunteers have undergone a five-minute listening experiences, then have described the experience in their own words, on paper, in an unstructured elicitation exercise. The responses have been aggregated to elicit common emergent descriptive themes, which were then mapped against each other to identify to what extent the experience was valuable, enjoyable and informative, and what qualia were available through this technique. There appear to some substantive differences between this way of experiencing music and spatial sound, and other modes of listening. Notably, the haptic component of the experience appears potentially informative and enjoyable. We conclude that development of similar techniques may have implications for augmented perception, particularly in respect of quality of life (QoL) in cases of conductive hearing loss.
    • Is everyone a Socrates now? A critical look at critical thinking

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08)
      You cannot choose to be critical or teach people to be critical unless you engage in conversation, a deep public conversation that requires considerable knowledge and understanding. In today's therapeutic culture, critical thinking skills and a variety of 'critical' approaches and theories appear to offer the possibility of 'becoming critical' when what they really offer is intellectual and moral conformism through therapy. The only solution is to abandon the therapy of 'critical thinking' and to 'learn and propagate the best that is known and thought in the world' and 'critical thinking' will take care of itself.
    • Is it time to rethink the 'university'?

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Conway Hall Ethical Society, 2017-03)
      Jeremiads abound on the ‘end’ or the ‘death’ of modern universities. There are claims that they are been severely compromised by ‘neoliberalism’ and social changes and left behind by technological advances. An increasing number of writers believe the university has been transformed turned into ‘safe spaces’, an extended school environment, that infantilises students. Many people describe this ‘crisis’ in academia but few offer any visions of the future and fewer still try to propose alternatives. This is an essay based upon a 'Thinking on Sunday' lecture given to the Conway Hall Ethical Society at Conway Hall, London on Sunday 4 December 2016.
    • Issues, applications and outcomes in interprofessional education

      Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (MedKnow Publications, 2014-04)
      In this issue, we are very pleased to present six articles, each of which has a strong interprofessional theme and which, we believe, collectively provide a flavor of the diversity of interprofessional community-oriented education, practice and research activity occurring internationally.
    • Itajime gasuri: digital warps

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (World Shibori Network, 31/10/2014)
      Itajime gasuri is a Japanese resist technique, which today is almost extinct but was originally employed to patterned warp yarns by clamping them between two boards engraved in high relief. When the clamped bundle was then immersed in a dye-bath, the dye was unable to penetrate into the areas under pressure and the resulting dyed and finally woven cloth produced an ikat like pattern. A process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase production of the labor intensive textile dyeing technique ikat was re-discovered by the highly skilled Craftsman and Japanese weaver Norio Koyama, who in 1996 when visited in Japan was the only remaining craftsperson to still employ on a commercial level, the traditional process of itajime gasuri: the utilization of identically carved wooden boards to resist pattern fabrics. As a silk weaver, Norio Koyama, became interested in the process of itajime gasuri having purchased the last remaining full set of traditional clamping boards. Teaching himself the intricate and precise processes involved with the technique and required to produce lengths of fabric with patterns similar to double 'ikat'. A present of eight old boards to the author enabled the technique to spread to Europe and has enabled further research to be carried out into the processes involved and along side advancements in digital technology provided an opportunity to reinvent the process by employing old or newly digitally machined boards to produce modern versions of such textiles, which when combined with digital technology in the form of image manipulation and digital printing both onto prepared fabric bases and warps prior to weaving has enabled the process to reinvent itself and design qualities achieved with such a technique evolve into a patterning method for the 21st Century. The excitement occurs when a process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase textile production of the resist dyeing technique ikat can be once again employed to create textile designs if new Itajime gasuri boards are created with digital manufacturing techniques and digital scanning along side digital printed will once woven produce an ikat effect: A complete cycle of creativity and innovation being achieved.
    • “It’s all about work”: New times, Post-Fordism and vocational pedagogy

      Avis, James; University of Huddersfield (Routledge, 2018-02-12)
    • “It’s nice to know you might make a difference”: engaging students through primary research as an authentic assessment

      Yates, Ellen; Oates, Ruby; University of Derby (RAISE network, 2021-02-23)
      This paper presents the views of undergraduate students on taking part in a small-scale student-staff research project to inform the design of a local community play space. The project repositioned students as researchers by providing them with an opportunity to engage in primary research with children through an authentic assessment task in a final year module. The students took on responsibility for the design and implementation of the primary research to elicit the views of young children aged 6-7 years, alongside Higher Education (HE) lecturers who collected the views of other key users of the space. The students experienced the project as engaging, challenging and as an opportunity for individual professional development, resulting in valuable learning including, increased confidence, professional aptitudes, and applied research skills. While finding much potential in co- research projects for student engagement, we recognise barriers within the higher education curriculum that mitigate against their success as part of assessment. The reconceptualization of HE within a market economy and the changing expectations of students further limit the success of such projects.
    • Jan Kochanowski: Polish poet

      Tighe, Carl (2012-09)
    • Jane Austen free indirect style, gender and interiority in literary fiction

      MacMahon, Barbara; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-05-21)
      In this chapter I suggest that Jane Austen’s use of free indirect style has a far-reaching legacy in terms of establishing the form as central to a sense of literariness in prose fiction. More particularly, I argue that Austen’s use of language metarepresents the thoughts of female characters as a dynamic process of understanding themselves and their worlds. This coincides with a more general perception, construction and performance of ‘feminine’ thought and language use as hesitant, equivocal and spontaneous. I explore the influence of Austen’s style with close analysis and comparison of passages of interiority in Austen’s Mansfield Park, Katherine Mansfield’s short story ‘Millie’ and Monica Ali’s novel Brick Lane.
    • Jane Austen, free indirect style, gender and interiority in literary fiction.

      MacMahon, Barbara; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-11-12)
      Austen is known for her development of free indirect style as a narrative form. Free indirect style is a fusion of narrator and character perspectives, a peculiar linguistic manipulation of deictic centres which allows for a semi-experiential representation of a character’s perceptions, thoughts and experiences. The style does not tell, it shows, and in doing so it invites close engagement with and empathetic reading of character, at the same time as maintaining the distance of a third-person narrative. This can be a powerful narrative device with complex effects.
    • Jane Eyre's Arrival at Thornfield Hall: Illustration of Jane Eyre’ arrival at Thornfield Hall

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2014-06)
      The illustration was awarded first prize in the illustration section of the Brontë Society creative competition. The print submitted for the Brontë creative competition investigated and examined the use of hand drawn elements in a predominantly photographic printing process and how this might be developed and disseminated to the design student cohort through my teaching using the photogravure method of creating mark-making. The work has been viewed at local, national and international levels by those interested in the works of the Bronte’s and the research could potentially give a greater understanding of the history and literature of the Bronte’s to general art enthusiasts and a wider public audience. Also published in Bronte Studies January 2015 40 (1)
    • The Jews, the Holocaust and the public: the legacies of David Cesarani

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-11-25)
      This book explores the work and legacy of Professor David Cesarani OBE, a leading British scholar and expert on Jewish history who helped to shape Holocaust research, remembrance and education in the UK. It is a unique combination of chapters produced by researchers, curators and commemoration activists who either worked with and/or were taught by the late Cesarani. The chapters in this collection consider the legacies of Cesarani’s contribution to the discipline of history and the practice of public history. The contributors offer reflections on Cesarani’s approach and provide new insights into the study of Anglo-Jewish history, minorities and nationalisms, Nazi war crimes and their legacies and the history and public legacies of the Holocaust. This edited collection comprises 17 chapters (approx' 365 pages) that have been curated by Dr Larissa Allwork and Dr Rachel Pistol. As well as working with Pistol to select and copy edit all the chapters, Allwork co-wrote the 'introduction' with Pistol (c. 6000 words), proposing that there is a distinctly 'Cesaranian' interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Holocaust. Allwork also submitted two further chapters to the collection. The first, a sole authored chapter offering an original interpretation of Gerhard Richter and Gustav Metzger's artistic confrontations with Nazi criminality (c. 10,000). The second, a transcript of an interview conducted with Cesarani in 2009 (c. 7,500 words). This includes an introductory section which self-reflexively grounds the interview and is fully footnoted and referenced.
    • John Clare, herbalism, and elegy

      Lafford, Erin; University of Derby (Edinburgh University Press, 2020)
      Discussions of Clare’s engagement with botany often trace his fraught relationship with taxonomy, exploring his admiration for common names over the ‘dark system’ of Linnaean classification. This essay expands understanding of Clare’s botanical imagination by considering how he brings his botanical ‘taste’ to bear on the flower as a key figure of elegiac consolation. I refocus attention on his formative preference for pre-Linnaean herbalism and explore how it informs his engagement with elegiac tradition and imagery, especially in relation to Gray’s ‘Elegy’. I attend to how herbalism is brought into relationship with poetic representations of the floral, focussing especially on the connection between Clare’s preference for herbals and Elizabeth Kent’s Flora Domestica. I then discuss ‘Cauper Green’ and ‘The Village Doctress’ (Clare’s most sustained poetic discussions of herbalism) as elegies that try to reconcile the finite temporality of human life with the regenerative life cycles of plants and their flowers.
    • John Minton’s "Time was away: A notebook in Corsica"

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (10/11/2016)
      The paper examines the range in Minton’s approach at two levels. Firstly, it considers his dual strategies of Romanticism and Realism. Minton conflates topographical concerns with Neo-Romantic tendencies and draws on the landscape traditions of the sublime and picturesque, and the trope of the figure in the landscape. Secondly, the paper examines the images within a register of autonomy. Some images, operate autonomously, procuring primarily aesthetic responses; in contrast, others demand more literal intertextual readings; still, a further category of semi autonomous images are identified which subtly evoke elements of the text, without being hostage to Ross’s prose. These works in particular, I argue, invite the reader/viewer to re-assemble text and image so as to re-envision and re-imagine the Corsican Landscape. By examining text-image relationships, the place of landscape in post-war illustration, collaborative practice, and the relationship between fine art and illustration, the paper aims to contribute to forwarding the theorisation of illustration.
    • Jonathan Vickers and Kerri Pratt

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (WordPress, 21/07/2014)
      2014 Jonathan Vickers Award winner Kerri Pratt, her work and circumstances relating to the award.
    • The journal of imaginary research. Volume 3.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Guccione, Kay; University of Derby (NATCECT, 2018)
    • Journeys, pathways and track plans

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2014-10)
      Journeys - a 2 week contemporary art exhibition based around the idea of the various forms a journey can take, be that physical, of the mind or imagination. Ecopsychology is a psychological subfield that looks at the relationship between human beings and their environment, embracing a more revolutionary paradigm: just as Freud believed that neuroses were the consequences of dismissing deep rooted sexual and aggressive instincts, eco-psychologists believe that grief, despair and anxiety are the consequences of dismissing equally deep rooted ecological instincts.’ It is this connection between the human psyche and nature that is being explored. ‘In the Drowned World’ a recent series of images taken on walks along the track-bed of a disused railway feature labyrinthine, tangled and sometimes menacing vegetation inspired by the paintings of Max Ernst, alluding to Ballardian themes of nature’s retribution. The large scale image is printed on duratrans mounted on opaque Perspex and fixed to the outside of a window, the impression being of the tangled vegetation viewed through the window.
    • Karl Marx's Capital and transatlantic radical book-trade networks in the early twentieth century

      Feely, Catherine; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017)
      The book trade historically tended to operate in a spirit of co-operation as well as competition. Networks between printers, publishers, booksellers and related trades existed at local, regional, national and international levels and were a vital part of the business of books for several centuries. This collection of essays examines many aspects of the history of book-trade networks, in response to the recent ‘spatial turn’ in history and other disciplines. Contributors come from various backgrounds including history, sociology, business studies and English literature.
    • Karri Pratt: Our treasure houses

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 2015-09)
      Kerri Pratt’s paintings have references to curious spaces derived from man-made, industrial and urban landscapes. Drawing on childhood memories of growing up in an ex-mining town, when the demise of previously thriving industries of Collieries, Potteries, Pipeworks and Brickworks were all too prominent. Kerri has reconnected with her home county of Derbyshire to produce a new series of paintings referencing remnants and traces of our industrial heritage.
    • Kissing women: The fiction of Sarah Waters

      Bishton, Joanne; University of Derby (Lucian Blaga University Press, 2008)
      The lesbian historical novel is a genre that has been consistently neglected. Reasons of censorship and lack of credibility, during an increasingly hostile Victorian era, forced lesbians into exile, denying them their subjectivity and distancing them from any notion of same sex desire. Inevitably, lives have been lost or forgotten as a consequence. Looking at three of Sarah Waters novels, Tipping the Velvet, Affinity and The Fingersmith, this article intends to consider the existence of the marginalized working class lesbian. It hopes to show how a contemporary woman writer successfully exploits the unreliability of history in order to replicate a series of romantic fantasies and in so doing, it will argue that Waters’ fiction makes it possible to envisage lesbian desire beyond the limitations of heterosexual paradigms. Feminist and queer theory engagement with the texts will highlight the way Waters repossesses the desiring lesbian body, examining a series of erotic lesbian portrayals.