• International insights: Equality in education

      Shelton, Fiona; Chiou, Vana; Holz, Oliver; Ertürk, Nesrin; University of Derby (Waxmann Verlag, 2019-08-15)
      Educational institutions should offer a safe and secure environment for young people. Part of that should be educational equity, which is a measure of achievement, fairness, and opportunity in education. This publication analyses and discusses educational equality from different angles. All contributions reflect on the current situation of 11 European countries. All of them are part of the Bologna process and are dealing with the challenges of the development of a European Higher Education Area. This ongoing process is reflected in the present publication, with a specific focus on equality in education. The authors cover aspects like inclusion and inequality, internationalizing education, and accessing education, but they also deal with learning foreign languages, education for the future, assessment, feedback and student success, lifelong learning, teacher training as well as different aspects of the LGB(T+) community and gender and education.
    • The internet science fiction theatre database

      Callow, Christos Jr; University of Derby (2018)
      The Internet Science Fiction Theatre Database (ISFTDB) of Cyborphic primarily consists of contemporary plays, i.e. published and/or produced in the 21st Century. Some key texts of sci-fi theatre from the 20th Century are included in a separate section. For a more complete list of 20th Century science fiction plays, see Ralph Willingham’s appendix in his 1993 book Science Fiction and the Theatre. The database is created by Christos Callow Jr, playwright and lecturer at the University of Derby.
    • Interprofessional competencies: the poor cousin to clinical skills?

      Martin, Priya; Moran, Monica Catherine; Forman, Dawn; Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service; The University of Western Australia; University of Derby (Amee, 2017-07-07)
      The purpose of this paper is to clarify what work-based IPE is, challenge some common misconceptions about its values in clinical settings and highlight tools that will assist with its implementation in such settings.
    • Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes

      Roberts, Lynne D.; Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Taylor Francis, 2014-10-08)
      Undergraduate psychology students have been largely excluded from interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives. In contrast to many health professions, undergraduate psychology students do not engage in work placements as part of their degree, and many enter careers outside the health care context. However, the collaborative skills gained through an IPE experience may well be beneficial to students who work in this wider context. This research examines whether undergraduate psychology students’ views of IPE vary according to their planned career directions, and if so, whether the perceived relevance of IPE mediates the relationships. A sample of 188 Australian university undergraduate psychology students completed an online questionnaire following completion of a first-year IPE health sciences program. Path analysis indicated that psychology students’ attitudes towards IPE are associated with both professional identification and practitioner orientation, fully mediated through the perceived relevance of IPE to future career and study plans. Stronger professional identification and practitioner orientation were associated with greater perceived relevance and more positive and less negative attitudes towards IPE. Placing a stronger emphasis on the generalizability of IP skills taught may increase students’ awareness of the relevance outside of the health context, reducing disengagement of students planning alternative careers.
    • Interprofessional health education in Australia: Three research projects informing curriculum renewal and development

      Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Yassine, Tagrid; Matthews, Lynda; Saunders, Rosemary; Nicol, Pam; Alliex, Selma; University of Derby; Curtin University (Elsevier, 2014-05)
      Purpose This paper reports on three interrelated Australian studies that provide a nationally coherent and evidence-informed approach to interprofessional education (IPE). Based on findings from previous studies that IPE tends to be marginalized in mainstream health curriculum, the three studies aspired to produce a range of resources that would guide the sustainable implementation of IPE across the Australian higher education sector. Method Nine national universities, two peak industry bodies and a non-government organization constituted the study team. Data were gathered via a mixture of stakeholder consultations, surveys and interviews and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results & Conclusion An important outcome was a curriculum renewal framework which has been used to explore the implications of the study's findings on Australian nursing. While the findings are pertinent to all health professions, nursing is well placed to take a leading role in establishing IPE as a central element of health professional education.
    • Interrogating Europe's voids of memory: trauma theory and Holocaust remembrance between the national and the transnational.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Journal of Fondazione CDEC, 2016-12-16)
      Reflecting on the research process for 'Holocaust Remembrance between the National and the Transnational' (HRNT), which explores and analyzes the significance of the European and global politics of the commemoration of the Holocaust and Nazi-era crimes in the late 1990s and 2000s, this article will consider the influence of the intellectual context of trauma theory for this book. It will offer a response to the increasing critique of Eurocentric trauma theory which developed during the period spent researching the Stockholm International Forum (SIF 2000) and the first decade of the Task Force for International Co-operation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research (ITF, now the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, IHRA). This article will discuss how a revised trauma theory, along the lines suggested by scholars such as Joshua Pederson, continues to offer important possibilities for European studies of the histories and memories of the Holocaust in singular and comparative terms.
    • Introducing the individual teamwork observation and feedback tool (iTOFT): Development and description of a new interprofessional teamwork measure

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Dallest, Kathy; Moran, Monica Catherine; Dunston, Roger; Roberts, Chris; Eley, Diann; Bogossian, Fiona; Forman, Dawn; Bainbridge, Lesley; Drynan, Donna; et al. (Taylor and Francis, 2016-06-08)
      The individual Teamwork Observation and Feedback Tool (iTOFT) was devised by a consortium of seven universities in recognition of the need for a means of observing and giving feedback to individual learners undertaking an interprofessional teamwork task. It was developed through a literature review of the existing teamwork assessment tools, a discussion of accreditation standards for the health professions, Delphi consultation and field-testing with an emphasis on its feasibility and acceptability for formative assessment. There are two versions: the Basic tool is for use with students who have little clinical teamwork experience and lists 11 observable behaviours under two headings: ‘shared decision making’ and ‘working in a team’. The Advanced version is for senior students and junior health professionals and has 10 observable behaviours under four headings: ‘shared decision making’, ‘working in a team’, ‘leadership’, and ‘patient safety’. Both versions include a comprehensive scale and item descriptors. Further testing is required to focus on its validity and educational impact.
    • Introducing the LEADER Framework for Careers (1.0)

      Neary, Siobhan; Hooley, Tristram; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-10)
      The LEADER Framework for Careers sets out five main areas that all citizens should attend to as they develop their careers: personal effectiveness; managing relationships; finding and accessing work; managing life and career; and understanding the world. Under each of these five areas the framework details a series of career management skills. These career management skills provide tools for educators to focus their curriculum, for counsellors to shape their interactions with clients and for policy makers in considering what programmes to fund or promote. The LEADER Framework for Careers has been developed by the LEarning And Decision making Resources (LEADER) project. This Erasmus + project has been established to support lifelong learning guidance services to help individuals to develop career management skills. Career Management Skills (CMS) is the term used to describe the skills, attributes, attitudes and knowledge that individuals require in order to manage their career. The project has been undertaken by a consortium of European organisations drawn from Italy, Spain, Romania, Greece, Turkey and the UK.
    • Introduction

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Flowers, 2003)
    • Introduction

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby; Arts Research Centre, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 15/08/2018)
      This is the introduction for The Alternative Document, a special edition of Studies in Theatre and Performance edited by Angela Bartram. The edition contains essays by Angela Bartram, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Rochelle Haley, Sophie Kromholz, Una Lee, Andrew Pepper and Louise K. Wilson.
    • Introduction to John Gibbons

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Czech Museum of Fine Art, 2003)
    • Introduction.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Flowers, 2016-02)
      Catalogue introduction.
    • Introduction: Hard times? Building and sustaining research capacity in UK universities

      Hooley, Tristram; Williams, Sara; Kent, Raymond; University of Derby (Arma, 2010)
    • Introduction: the lives and legacies of David Cesarani

      Allwork Larissa; Pistol, Rachel; University of Derby; Kings College London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-11-25)
      This introduction to the edited collection ‘The Jews, the Holocaust and the Public’ focuses on David Cesarani as autobiographer and biographer. It comprises a brief introduction to Cesarani’s life in academia, his own autobiographical essay and his interest in biography as an academic form, via his studies of Benjamin Disraeli, Arthur Koestler and Adolf Eichmann. This chapter will present the new argument that these three figures can be interpreted as emblematic of three key overlapping themes in Cesarani’s broader research interests: Anglo-Jewish history; migration, minorities and nationalisms; and the Holocaust its history, the prosecution of the perpetrators and its ongoing legacies. It is these themes that comprise a uniquely ‘Cesaranian’ interdisciplinary approach to the Holocaust. It is also these themes, sometimes separately, and at other times in combination, that will animate the considerations of the chapters in this volume for the ‘Holocaust and its Contexts’.
    • Investigating spatial music qualia through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; University of Derby (Aalto University, 2017-07)
      A spatial array of vibro-mechanical transducers for bone-and-tissue conduction has been used to convey spatial ambisonic soundscape and spatial musical material. One hundred volunteers have undergone a five-minute listening experiences, then have described the experience in their own words, on paper, in an unstructured elicitation exercise. The responses have been aggregated to elicit common emergent descriptive themes, which were then mapped against each other to identify to what extent the experience was valuable, enjoyable and informative, and what qualia were available through this technique. There appear to some substantive differences between this way of experiencing music and spatial sound, and other modes of listening. Notably, the haptic component of the experience appears potentially informative and enjoyable. We conclude that development of similar techniques may have implications for augmented perception, particularly in respect of quality of life (QoL) in cases of conductive hearing loss.
    • Is everyone a Socrates now? A critical look at critical thinking

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08)
      You cannot choose to be critical or teach people to be critical unless you engage in conversation, a deep public conversation that requires considerable knowledge and understanding. In today's therapeutic culture, critical thinking skills and a variety of 'critical' approaches and theories appear to offer the possibility of 'becoming critical' when what they really offer is intellectual and moral conformism through therapy. The only solution is to abandon the therapy of 'critical thinking' and to 'learn and propagate the best that is known and thought in the world' and 'critical thinking' will take care of itself.
    • Is it time to rethink the 'university'?

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Conway Hall Ethical Society, 2017-03)
      Jeremiads abound on the ‘end’ or the ‘death’ of modern universities. There are claims that they are been severely compromised by ‘neoliberalism’ and social changes and left behind by technological advances. An increasing number of writers believe the university has been transformed turned into ‘safe spaces’, an extended school environment, that infantilises students. Many people describe this ‘crisis’ in academia but few offer any visions of the future and fewer still try to propose alternatives. This is an essay based upon a 'Thinking on Sunday' lecture given to the Conway Hall Ethical Society at Conway Hall, London on Sunday 4 December 2016.
    • Issues, applications and outcomes in interprofessional education

      Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (MedKnow Publications, 2014-04)
      In this issue, we are very pleased to present six articles, each of which has a strong interprofessional theme and which, we believe, collectively provide a flavor of the diversity of interprofessional community-oriented education, practice and research activity occurring internationally.
    • Itajime gasuri: digital warps

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (World Shibori Network, 31/10/2014)
      Itajime gasuri is a Japanese resist technique, which today is almost extinct but was originally employed to patterned warp yarns by clamping them between two boards engraved in high relief. When the clamped bundle was then immersed in a dye-bath, the dye was unable to penetrate into the areas under pressure and the resulting dyed and finally woven cloth produced an ikat like pattern. A process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase production of the labor intensive textile dyeing technique ikat was re-discovered by the highly skilled Craftsman and Japanese weaver Norio Koyama, who in 1996 when visited in Japan was the only remaining craftsperson to still employ on a commercial level, the traditional process of itajime gasuri: the utilization of identically carved wooden boards to resist pattern fabrics. As a silk weaver, Norio Koyama, became interested in the process of itajime gasuri having purchased the last remaining full set of traditional clamping boards. Teaching himself the intricate and precise processes involved with the technique and required to produce lengths of fabric with patterns similar to double 'ikat'. A present of eight old boards to the author enabled the technique to spread to Europe and has enabled further research to be carried out into the processes involved and along side advancements in digital technology provided an opportunity to reinvent the process by employing old or newly digitally machined boards to produce modern versions of such textiles, which when combined with digital technology in the form of image manipulation and digital printing both onto prepared fabric bases and warps prior to weaving has enabled the process to reinvent itself and design qualities achieved with such a technique evolve into a patterning method for the 21st Century. The excitement occurs when a process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase textile production of the resist dyeing technique ikat can be once again employed to create textile designs if new Itajime gasuri boards are created with digital manufacturing techniques and digital scanning along side digital printed will once woven produce an ikat effect: A complete cycle of creativity and innovation being achieved.