• Hunt, A. (2015) Acting Alone: Performance and the Political. Presented and performed at Performance, Politics, Protest, UCC, 4 September..

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (2015)
      Acting Alone is an artistic research project that has resulted in creating a solo performance funded by Arts Council England and University of Derby. This performance piece builds on five years of practice as research and unique enquiry using Applied Theatre techniques based on Hunt’s experiences in Palestine. The focus of this research will be to extend and develop the interaction between performer and audience extending the boundaries of performance as a political act of protest. Acting Alone invites the audience to interact: to cross the dramaturgical divide that explores political action and provokes questions around what is our responsibility to conflict as an international community? The structure places the audience in a powerful participatory position without confronting or exposing them. Acting Alone has performed at five showcase venues throughout the East Midlands receiving positive responses from audiences and also some controversial protestations. For some audiences, the piece was verging on being anti-Semitic. Heckling as well as heated challenges was experienced. However, Acting Alone presents a wide range of characters – Israeli, Palestinian and European all of whom offer powerful counter narratives. There is a rich musical soundtrack only—this is theatre stripped back, to draw the audience into a world that has to be created in its entirety in front of their eyes. The play is a personal story, at times heart-breaking and at times funny, that asks questions of theatre makers and audiences –what risks should we take? Can one person make a difference?
    • Huthwaite play project

      Oates, Ruby; Yates, Ellen (University of Derby, 2016-06)
      Huthwaite Play Project is a joint venture between Ashfield District Council (ADC), the University of Derby's Childhood Studies students and staff and involves representatives of local community in the north Nottinghamshire village of Huthwaite. A key aim of the project is to provide feedback to the Council to support the improvement of two local parks known as Brierley Forest Park and Huthwaite Welfare Park as identified in the Council's Locality Plan. Huthwaite Play Project incorporated two phases: phase one took place in the autumn of 2015 whereby site evaluations and children's views about park provision were gathered. Phase two took place in February 2016 and included meeting parents of very young children at the local Sure Start Centre as well as talking with older children and young people who attended a local youth club in the village on a Friday evening.
    • ‘I didn’t know you could read': questioning the legitimacy of Kim Kardashian-West’s status as a cultural and literary intermediary

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Brill, 2018-11-17)
      This paper considers the reactions to the announcement of the Kim Kardashian-West Book Klub and explores how this episode illustrated the perceived illegitimacy of celebrities like Kardashian-West, who are commonly associated with ‘lowbrow culture’, engaging with and discussing literature, an activity that has traditionally been seen as a middlebrow endeavour. The reactions to the Kardashian-West Book Klub not only reflect issues around the status of celebrities as cultural intermediaries but also bring to the fore historical principles that have questioned the intelligence and capabilities of women readers. This paper positions the Kim Kardashian-West Book Klub within the wider historical context of women readers and book clubs and considers the prestige, or lack thereof, of celebrities who try to be cultural and literary intermediaries. The paper also considers the Kardashian-West Book Klub in relation to other major celebrity book clubs and argues that such forays into literary culture are used by some celebrities to bolster their social and cultural capital, acting first and foremost as a branch of their personal brand identity, rather than as altruistic enterprises.
    • ‘I don’t make out how important it is or anything’: identity and identity formation by part-time higher education students in an English further education college.

      Esmond, Bill; Chesterfield College (Taylor & Francis, 2012-07-04)
      Policymakers in England have recently, in common with other Anglophone countries, encouraged the provision of higher education within vocational Further Education Colleges. Policy documents have emphasised the potential contribution of college-based students to widening participation: yet the same students contribute in turn to the difficulties of this provision. This article draws on a study of part-time higher education students in a college, a group whose perspectives, identities and voices have been particularly neglected by educational research. Respondents’ narratives of non-participation at 18 indicated the range of social and geographical constraints shaping their decisions and their aspirations beyond higher education; whilst they drew on vocational and adult traditions to legitimate college participation, their construction of identity was also shaped by the boundaries between further education and the university. These distinctive processes illustrate both possibilities and constraints for future higher education provision within colleges
    • 'I Speak about Myself to You' – Renegotiating the Voice of Documentary through Animation Aesthetics

      Bosward, Marc; Bevan, Greg; University of Derby; University of Salford (The Higher Education Academy, 23/06/2011)
      Documentary practice has long been encumbered with journalistic and pseudo-scientific expectations; the gathering of evidence, the balancing of material and the objective presentation of accurate and informative data. Overwhelmingly, documentary audiences are encouraged to believe in an objective reality and, by extension, to anticipate fidelity to it. Filmmakers' aesthetic choices are selected and organised to persuade the viewer that the resulting voice of the documentary is an honest, rational and sensible point of view. This paper will explore the documentary filmmaker's detachment from an obligation to deliver objective truth by applying the visual, aural and temporal distortions of animation to interrogate conventional notions of knowledge, reliability and authority. By taking a collaborative approach to the research project, the paper will explore the inherent transformative, non-representational and illusory nature of animation in relation to the construction of authorial voice for documentary. Drawing on the theory and practice of filmmakers Aleksandr Sokurov and Alexander Kluge, the paper will assess to what extent truth can be derived from expressionistic aesthetic components as readily as they can from the narration of factual information and photographic reality; can animation in documentary assimilate fiction into fact and synthesise truth and fantasy? Further, the paper will argue that the didactic voice of traditional, expository documentary encourages passive observation while animation can provoke a more poetic interpretation of the films' diegesis; how can the authenticity of documentary material be legitimised by foregrounding authorial mediation rather than attempting to camouflage subjectivity? The introduction of animation aesthetics into documentary realism offers the filmmaker a wider choice of expressive tools to define, extend and affirm their own personal voice. This paper will offer a practical assessment of these issues, offering new approaches for filmmakers to explore the epistemological resonance of their craft, and to extend the formal and thematic parameters that determine documentary's status as nonfiction testimony.
    • I wouldn't start from here: The second-generation Irish in Britain

      French, Ray; McCrory, Moy; Mckay, Kath; University of Derby (The Wild Geese Press, 2019-04-08)
      The Wild Geese Press launches with a collection to showcase second-generation Irish writers in Britain. Not quite British, not quite Irish, through their essays, fiction and poetry about music, family, and history these distinguished writers explore questions of identity and belonging and ask the perennial question: where is home – here or Ireland? The writers gathered here hold up a mirror to the diverse and complicated experience of the Irish in Britain. The collection features essays, fiction and poetry from Elizabeth Baines, Maude Casey, Ray French, Maria C. McCarthy, Moy McCrory, Kath Mckay and John O’Donoghue and many more.
    • The idea is slavery.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Blanchard, Jake; University of Sheffield (Spirit Duplicator, 2015)
    • Identities and communities: negotiating working-class identity in the regional press

      Steel, John; University of Sheffield (Edinburgh University Press, 2020-11)
      This chapter examines of how regional newspapers sought to represent working-class interests during three distinctive periods of the twentieth century: the 1930s, the 1950s and the 1980s. In doing so, it examines the negotiation newspapers had to make between national and regional identity as well as class and ideological affiliation. The chapter also provides a more focused case study as an example of where regional and national editorial agendas were negotiated around a particular issue – the Sheffield marches for free speech in 1914 in the pages of the Sheffield Daily Telegraph. The case study and the three historical periods under examination emphasise stories which signal the ways in which working-class identity is being negotiated within their specific constituencies by emphasising key ideological parameters of this negotiation. The material presented here stresses how, in seeking to represent and reflect (Bell 1984) both the distinctive local character of their readership and also a particular moral and political outlook, regional newspapers were seeking to provide a more nuanced and less confrontational news product than their national counterparts. Such nuance reflects the process of negotiation as regional newspapers were pulled, Janus-faced, in two opposing directions: one that sought to connect with and reflect their readers’ interests, the other reinforcing particular notions of place and class status – the more explicit ideological character of newspapers’ coverage. Though negotiation resonates in a wide variety of stories and newspaper content, it is at its most stark when the regional titles cover topics centred around economic hardship, industrial disputes and party-political affiliation and it is these stories that form the main focus of this survey.
    • ‘If you look the part you’ll get the job’: should career professionals help clients to enhance their career image?

      Yates, Julia; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2014)
      This article presents a critical exploration of the role of career professionals in supporting people to reflect on and enhance their appearance, attractiveness and self-presentation (career image). The article is conceptual and based on a review of the broader literature on career success, appearance and attractiveness. It explores the evidence for a relationship between attractiveness and career, and the authors propose a conceptual framework in which career image is comprised of three elements (interpersonal skills, aesthetic presentation and beauty). The paper examines a possible role for career professionals in relation to this and then critically examines this role and concludes with the proposition of a research agenda in this area.
    • Igniting imagination through darkness: discovering fear and fantasy through shadows, silence and the invisible.

      Slabbert, Barend; Jordaan, June; Cape Peninsula University of Technology (Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2016)
      Darkness invites imagination. On the one hand, it creates intimacy. It has been observed by many artforms that we feel the need to close off our vision during intense emotional experiences, during dreaming, listening to music, or caressing our loved ones. Shadows can be seen to do this for us, as they dim vision and entice unconscious peripheral vision and tactile fantasy. On the other hand, darkness entices fear. A person, who is afraid of the dark, writes Finnish architect Palasmaa, has no factual reason to fear darkness as such; he is afraid of his own imagination. Darkness, or the lack of light, is also often accompanied by silence and has the ominous ability to render the visible invisible. To probe the experience of darkness, this paper will refer to the philosophical position of phenomenology. In this regard, darkness is seen as a phenomenon that is experienced through our bodily senses. The phenomenology of darkness will be investigated be making reference to the way we project ourselves onto architectural spaces, also known as ‘mimesis of the body’. Furthermore, it will be investigated how our perceptions, memories and imaginings of past experiences influence such projections. This paper hopes to show how the relation between imagination, our mental faculty that forms images of external concepts not present to the senses, and darkness, can be understood by interpreting spatial narratives of architectural interiors. A selection of evocative interiors will be interpreted in terms of three factors that contribute to the phenomenology of darkness: shadows, silence, and the invisible. By doing so, this paper hopes to indicate how darkness has strong existential expressions that can be incorporated into spatial narratives in architectural interiors.
    • Illustrated worlds

      Bosward, Marc; Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (Association of Illustrators, 2013-10)
      The practice of the contemporary illustrator is no longer exclusively defined by the traditional orthodoxies of the commissioner and illustrator relationship. Contemporary Illustration has expanded the parameters of the discipline to include toys, games, animation, collectable objects, fashion and other forms of media and merchandising. This multi-disciplinary and authorial practice is often predicated on the creation of an identifiable, virtual ‘world’ that is manifest across an illustrator’s output, independent of variations in audience, purpose and subject matter. This paper will explore the illustrator’s use of visual language in constructing virtual, illustrated worlds.Drawing from a range of contemporary examples, the paper will explore the capacity of illustration to generate a virtual world that engages and absorbs its audience. The paper will argue that a sense of place established through non-representational approaches can address the actual, socio-historical world through the interpretation of the constructed world’s diegesis. The paper will also consider how a world is realised across personal and commercial outputs and the interrelationship and interface of authorial and commercial imperatives.
    • Illustrated worlds, virtual environments and authorial voice

      Bosward, Marc; Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2013-01)
      The practice of the contemporary illustrator is no longer exclusively defined by the traditional orthodoxies of the commissioner and illustrator relationship. Contemporary Illustration has expanded the parameters of the discipline to include toys, games, animation, collectable objects, fashion and other forms of media and merchandising. This multi-disciplinary and authorial practice is often predicated on the creation of an identifiable, virtual 'world' that is manifest across an illustrator's output, independent of variations in audience, purpose and subject matter. This paper will explore the illustrator's use of visual language in constructing virtual worlds that define authorial voice. Drawing from a range of contemporary and historical examples, the paper will explore the capacity of illustration to generate a virtual world that engages and absorbs its audience. How does an illustrator use the language of exaggeration, distortion, symbolism and metaphor to construct a system of coherent signifiers that constitute a world that is repeatedly revisited across their practice? The paper will argue that a sense of place established through non-representational approaches can address the actual, socio-historical world through the interpretation of the constructed world's diegesis. An analysis of contemporary illustration in its relationship to genre and authorship will be discussed in relation to this premise. The paper will also consider how a world is realised across personal and commercial outputs and the interrelationship and interface of authorial and commercial imperatives. The paper will offer an assessment of these issues, offering approaches for illustrators to explore the intellectual, psychological and emotional resonance of illustrated worlds, and to extend the formal and thematic parameters that determine illustration's status as a narrative form.
    • Illustrating Corsica: The modernist landscape of John Minton's Time Was Away.

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (Intellect Ltd., 01/04/2018)
      The article considers John Minton’s (1917–57) illustrations of landscape for the book Time Was Away: A Notebook in Corsica (1948) with an aim to recover their significance in the history of illustration. Certain illustrations are positioned as notable for their ambiguous relationship to the text. I elaborate thinking around text–image relations alongside questions concerning the cross-fertilization of fine art and illustration. In their adoption of modernist principles, Minton’s illustrations are significant in recasting the role of illustration in the artistic context of post-war Britain. In melding formalist effects with realist concerns, the illustrations raise broader matters around realism, fine art and the democratic potential of illustration. I show that in seizing on cinematic techniques, Minton offers an effectively modern response to the traditional paradigm of depth associated with landscape and thereby proffers an alternative to the Modernist paradox that a teleological development of painting is at odds with landscape.
    • Immersive deconstruction: An exploration of dynamic loop-based performance diffused in a multi-channel environment.

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Kling Gut Symposium, 10/06/2017)
      This performance at klingt gut! 3rd International Symposium on Sound by the audio-visual duo, Time.lus, explores (through live interaction) the dynamic dialogue between rhythmic, audio-visual materials in space. Original source material is presented then deconstructed and improvisationally reimagined in real-time, to create synchronous / asynchronous rhythms and textures. The work is evolved through the use of audio-visual effects and dynamic processors.
    • The impact of career guidance on progression in learning and work: a literature review

      Neary, Siobhan; Hooley, Tristram; Morris, Marian; Mackay, Susan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      This paper sets out the findings of a review of the literature on how career guidance can support individuals to progress to positive learning and work destinations. It argues that positive progression is a legitimate and appropriate outcome of career guidance, although access to career guidance is only one amongst a range of factors that might influence an individual’s likelihood of progressing. It also notes that progression can be difficult to measure in research. The initial review found a range of evidence which demonstrated that career guidance can have a positive influence on individuals’ progression to learning and work. It highlighted a number of features that underpin the effectiveness of career guidance in this area. 1. Services need to be provided in a timely fashion, and as quickly after an individual has dropped out of learning or work as possible. 2. Services need to be provided professionally by skilled advisers. In addition to these points, the paper advances a model of the features of effective practice that support individuals to engage positively with progression. This focuses on establishing positive attitudes and behaviours, engaging in developing and effectively applying job search skills and creating a support network using both informal and formal sources. The evidence suggests that all of these interventions are useful, but multiple integrated activities are most successful, especially if they focus on building motivation as well as job search skills.
    • In absence of the smoky god.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2014)
      Essay to accompany Matt Stokes' solo show at Site.
    • In advance of the broken image: Gerhard Richter and Gustav Metzger’s confrontations with Nazi criminality

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-11-25)
      This chapter focuses on Gerhard Richter’s Uncle Rudi (1965) and Mr Heyde (1965) and Gustav Metzger’s Historic Photographs series (1995–1998) in order to present a new interpretation of how these artists perform the photograph in order to provoke cultural rather than legal confrontations with Nazi criminality. Rejecting Holocaust representational pieties in favour of the reinterpretation of the Duchampian ‘Readymade’ in the case of Richter, and Dada’s anti-aesthetics of destruction and revulsion in Metzger’s, this chapter will argue that Richter’s oblique pose of the ‘anti-ideological artist’ and Metzger’s more overt performance of the ‘subversive social activist’ are part of important social and cultural processes of confronting Nazi criminality. These types of cultural reckonings were recognized as important in David Cesarani’s edited collection, After Eichmann: Collective Memory and the Holocaust after 1961 (2005).