• A 'History of the Present': reflections on the representation of History in peace and conflict research in Hudson, Robert, C. and Heintze, Hans - Joachim (eds), Different approaches to peace and conflict research

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University of Deusto Press, Bilbao, Spain, 2008)
      For Hudson, history of the present is, at its simplest level, history without hindsight but with insight, and it is this that makes it different from other forms of history, and necessitates also that the historian of the present borrows methodologies, ideologies and practice from other academic disciplines. The historian of the present is an interdisciplinarian. Being a historian of the presnt often entails fieldwork and conducting interviews rather than working in the 'dusty' archives normally associated with the work of the more conventional historian. Indeed, to some extent the historian of the present works very much more like an anthropologist, or even like a journalist, rather than the so-called 'traditional' historian. The historian of the presnt should have a deep knowledge of the culture of the area that they are researching and representing. This involves insight, and this insight is given more credibility if the historian knows the language(s) of the area concerned and has mastered, or at least engaged in other disciplines, such as literature, or anthropology, politics and languages.
    • Holding Their Own: How Line of Duty offers the BBC a competitive edge in an increasingly crowded mediascape

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-10-01)
      The British Broadcasting Corporation’s (BBC) hit television series Line of Duty (2012-present) is the envy of every UK broadcaster and international streaming service alike, attracting enormous audiences and near universal critical acclaim. A number of factors have contributed to the success of BBC television dramas and have helped the organisation garner large audiences and thus remain relevant to a modern audience bombarded by numerous viewing platforms, countless titles and ever-present distractions and competition from social media and podcasting. Whereas commercial television networks are motivated to commodify audiences up to, and sometimes beyond saturation, PSBs can take a more artistically focused approach that serves to benefit the programme and audience first which leads to a better product. Another key factor is the social aspect afforded by synchronous TV viewing by the audience and the ‘second screening’ that goes with this live practice (Doughty, 2012; Proulx, 2012). This allows audiences to interact online before, during and after live broadcasts thus connect viewers and create online virtual communities (Rheingold, 2000). This communal experience can have a social bonding (Putnam, 2000) effect and help build a loyal following week after week – a lost tradition in an age of series dumps and binge watching. The author argues that in the modern highly competitive mediascape the BBC must take note of the factors that have contributed to their past and recent successes and work to replicate these in their future programming strategies. The BBC must also go one step further however, and attract the younger generations of viewers who represent the future Television License Fee payers. Through textual analysis of successful television programmes including Lost (2000-2006), The Office (2005-2006), Bodyguard (2018) and Line of Duty (2012-present), among others, this paper draws on examples of historical successes to chart a path for the future of BBC Television drama programming.
    • A holistic approach to teaching and personal tutoring

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (2016-05)
      Workshop training session to pre-service trainee teachers
    • A holistic approach to the decolonisation of modules in sustainable interior design

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Johannesburg (Design Education Forum of Southern Africa, 2017-09)
      This paper stems from the need to develop and deliver a new module in sustainable interior design (BASD6B2) at a 2nd year level within a new Degree programme at the University of Johannesburg, in 2017. This module’s development however relies on a reflection on another sustainable interior design module (BASD6B1) in the curriculum, offered at a 1st year level. The paper also secondly arises from the national call for the transformation and decolonisation of education programmes in South African tertiary institutions. This new BASD6B2 module thus needs to demonstrate a deeper connection with African roots, rather than make use of over-emphasised Eurocentric ideals. Like the global Ubuntu education approach, decolonisation requires an advancement of indigenous knowledge, expertise, teaching and learning. Thirdly, there is also a need for interior design education, worldwide, to align itself with changing notions of sustainability, which requires educators to embrace a new, emerging ecological paradigm. In this paradigm, regenerative thinking seeks to push sustainable design from merely sustaining the health of a system, towards more holistic, systems thinking, reconnecting us to place and the rituals of place (Reed 2007, p. 677). A reflection on both the sustainable interior design modules’ designs reveals several gaps. Firstly, there is no specific requirement that the emerging ecological paradigm, and the notion of regenerative thinking, be taught within the module. Secondly, one of the module outcomes requires that students be taught about sustainability through the use of a rating tool, the Green Star SA (GSSA) Interiors Rating Tool, which, while valuable, is too mechanistic and does not support holistic thinking. Thirdly, another gap is that the Green Building Council of South Africa’s (GBCSA) Green Star SA – Interiors v1 Technical Manual includes little to no reference of African studies, methods and skills in the technical manual. This issue is revealed in my ongoing PhD study, which uses a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fourthly, the tool is based on an Australian tool which is, in turn, based on an American tool, and it thus deploys western constructs. The aim of this paper is thus to develop a teaching strategy that can complement the design of both modules, with a focus however on the new module BASD6B2, in order to teach students about sustainability more holistically, while celebrating and advancing African building methods and skills. The main findings reveal that the sustainable interior design modules (based on the given outcomes) do not support a holistic and decolonised approach to teaching and learning. A holistic teaching strategy is thus necessary to promote an African identity. The paper concludes that this pro-active teaching strategy can augment the sustainable interior design modules. Firstly both modules can include a holistic introductory lesson. A second tactic in the strategy could be to include diverse curriculum content and regenerative design concepts into the BASD6B2 module. This strategy generally aims to advance students’ mindsets about sustainable design, while encouraging them to be co-creators of local knowledge, while designing sustainably, for an African identity.
    • Holocaust remembrance as ‘civil religion’: the case of the Stockholm Declaration.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-07)
    • Holocaust remembrance between the national and the transnational: the Stockholm International Forum and the first decade of the International Task Force.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015-07-30)
      'Holocaust Remembrance Between the National and the Transnational' provides a key study of the remembrance of the Jewish Catastrophe and the Nazi-era past in the world arena. It uses a range of primary documentation from the restitution conferences, speeches and presentations made at the Stockholm International Forum of 2000 (SIF 2000), a global event and an attempt to mark a defining moment in the inter-cultural construction of the political and institutional memory of the Holocaust in the USA, Europe and Israel. Containing oral history interviews with delegates to the conference and contemporary press reports, this book explores the inter-relationships between global and national Holocaust remembrances.
    • Holy cards & bubble gum.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (2013-04)
      The hagiography represents the edited versions of a life, and presents us only with those things we are supposed to know. Those details glimpsed behind the official version of a life are often the most interesting. Just as Vasari listened to gossip to produce his Lives of the Artists, we have this urge to listen in, to discover the alternative lives behind the official versions. The Lives of the Saints offer endless possibilities to re-imagine and to reposition current needs behind those paragons of virtue. In this workshop I will flip over the Holy Cards to reveal a different set of circumstances beneath the saint’s day. Every day has its saint, every place has its patron, and every occupation has its guardian.. Some of the stories will be genuine, others invented, but it is not always easy to tell which are the real and which are the impossible saints.
    • Homemaker

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (Surface Gallery, 2016-01)
      The postcard was exhibited at the The International Postcard Show,Surface Gallery, Nottingham.The postcard exhibition featured hundreds of original artworks in a wide range of media by established artists, from all over the world. The postcard was created using traditional drawing and screen-printed media based around an old mid -century cupboard and its contents.
    • Homestead

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (Highlights, 2016)
      The artist book was exhibited at the Contemporary Artists’ PAGES, Book Fair, The Tetley, Leeds & in a touring exhibition of paper-cut and artist’s books in Cumbria and Northumbria. The book was published in conjunction with an artist book project created for the third year illustration student cohort and was used as an example for learning and teaching.
    • Hours spent building skills and employability

      Foster, Rowan; Svanaes, Siv; Howell, Sarah; Neary, Siobhan; Everitt, Julia; Dodd, Vanessa; University of Derby (Department for Education, 2020-07)
      This report summarises findings from a mixed-methods research project conducted by IFF Research, in partnership with the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby, to measure the time that young people spend on activities in and outside of education which builds their skills and employability. This research involved two phases. Firstly, a qualitative phase in summer 2017 comprising 15 interviews with education providers and nine focus groups with young people. This phase explored providers’ experiences of planning and recording planned hours, and the activities that young people undertake to build their skills and employability. The second phase of the research involved a quantitative survey of students in March 2018, consisting of a total of 2,024 interviews. The survey sample included students in pre and post-16 education and those in academic and technical courses. Findings suggest pre-16 students, i.e. years 10 and 11, on average participate in 852 qualification hours per year across all their subjects (22.4 per week). This compares to an average of 563 annual hours amongst post-16 students, i.e. years 12 and 13, (15.1 hours per week). There were no significant differences between those in post-16 academic educations and those in post-16 technical education in the average number of qualification hours reported per week (15.0 and 15.1 respectively). Students also engage in a range of non-qualification activities expected to contribute to their wider employability, with careers guidance and exam revision and practice common across all ages. This pattern was also consistent between full and part-time students. Post-16 students doing mainly academic qualifications spend the most amount of time on homework and self-study (nearly 13 hours per week), with post-16 students in technical education spending on average 8 hours on these tasks.
    • How 'learning styles' undermine education

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (spiked Ltd., 2017-03-16)
      Why 'learning styles' are bogus and why we should not be using them.
    • How can a war be holy? Weimar attitudes towards Eastern spirituality

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
    • How the lessons we learned become lessons we can learn: Understanding memories of primary school experiences using narrative inquiry

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (Waxmann Verlag, 2019-08-15)
      This chapter reflects upon the experiences of the methodological journey I undertook to collect and analyse data for my doctoral research. The reflection explains approaches I took to attempt an authentic and open approach to my research which positions the participants (narrators), as co-authors of their stories of their primary school experiences. In this chapter, I have focused on one theme which related to the lessons learned at school, as remembered by the narrators. The paper explains why narrative inquiry is a valuable method to understand experience and how I try to make sense of stories, recognising that narrators remember the stories with recollections, reflections and feelings (affect). I observed how stories needed to be ‘awakened’; they are not simply remembered and retold. Extracts from different stories told by some of the narrators are shared throughout the paper to exemplify the narratives and how I attempted to create a sense of equality in the co-construction of people's narratives. The final reflections demonstrate the lessons I have learned, looking beyond others' ways of approaching narrative research and finding ways to be an authentic researcher. This paper tells the story of what I have discovered in the research process and makes a methodological contribution to the field of narrative inquiry.
    • How the university lost its way: Sixteen threats to academic freedom

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-11-27)
      Are you happy to let someone tell you what to think? No one is. In universities, where academics have a particular role encapsulated in the phrase ‘academic freedom’—the responsibility to speak your mind and challenge conventional wisdom—they have a duty to refuse to be told what to think. My challenge to academics at the Higher Education Institutional Research (HEIR) Conference 2019 was that, in their unquestioning compliance with many familiar functions of the university today, they have willingly accepted innovations and impositions that do just that, tell you what to think. It is time to give them a wake-up call.
    • How to develop creative capacity for the fourth industrial revolution: Creativity and employability in higher education

      Wilson, Chris; Lennox, Peter; Brown, Michael; Hughes, Gareth; University of Derby (Knowledge, Innovation & Enterprise, 15/10/2017)
      With changing patterns of accountability in higher education, universities are becoming increasingly focused on performing well against a growing number of metrics. Many used as proxy measures to indicate value of educational experience, amongst the most common and perhaps most notable are those relating to graduate career destinations. Universities have never been more focused on ensuring that graduates are ‘employable’. In the midst of the fourth industrial revolution, numerous studies highlight the potential significance and value of creativity, problem-solving and critical thinking, for successful navigation of the complexities of the future. Consequently, these capacities are becoming more significant in determining graduate career development and educational strategy in higher education. This chapter presents a synthesis of related fields of research to construct an outline framework for the development of organizational creativity and creative graduates concluding that there are aspects of current pedagogical practice capable of worthwhile reform.
    • How to promote real equality in higher education

      Mieschbuehler, Ruth; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-10-30)
      This chapter aims to open up a debate about two meanings of ‘equality’ in higher education (HE). The first meaning of ‘equality’ is ‘the right to be the same’. The second meaning of ‘equality’ is ‘the right to be different’. Three contrasting examples from politics, compulsory education and HE are given in detail to illustrate how the meaning of the term ‘equality’ has changed. The older meaning of ‘equality’ required a universal and common education for all students. The newer meaning requires the curriculum to be refocused on the perceived group identities that necessitate a variety of curricula. The curriculum in HE has become divisive and undermines education for all students. This chapter raises issues that are rarely discussed for fear of being offensive. The future of HE depends on opening up a debate about the divisive nature of current conceptions of ‘equality’ that undermine HE – the university - as the embodiment of Enlightenment universalism.
    • How to win at being a student.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-07-31)
      A chapter describing the formation of undergraduate friendships in the twin markets of accommodation and the night-time economy. Comments on banter (the cultural capital of the night-time economy) and uses blason populaire to distinguish vernacular competition between the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University.
    • How trigger warnings shoot down free debate

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (spiked Ltd., 2014-03-20)
      The only thing we need ‘trigger warnings’ about on campus are trigger warnings. I expect British satirical website the Daily Mash will soon start selling t-shirts with the words ‘TRIGGER WARNING’ on them. If it does, every academic worthy of the name should buy one and proudly wear it on campus.
    • Human rights, participatory theatre and regional publics: Acting Alone and A Story to Tell

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (29/04/2017)
      This paper explores how artists are continuing to develop new participatory theatre models that address social and political issues within a human rights arena. Using my productions, Acting Alone and A Story to Tell, as its primary case studies, the paper will examine how efficacy can be created with different community audiences by experimenting with forms of participatory, autobiographical and verbatim theatre. Acting Alone is a monologue performance about Palastinian refugee camps from the perspective of a mother and artist, and A Story to Tell is a verbatim first-hand account of refugees in Greece. Informed by current refugee theatre, theory and practice, this paper asks how artists might use performance to engage audiences in revolutionary thinking in relation to immigration, refugees and human rights issues. Boal’s premise that theatre is a weapon for revolution will be drawn on; however, when audiences may not be directly positioned as oppressed or oppressor, what other concerns are raised? If refugee stories are presented without political advocacy, they run the risk of reenforcing images of refugees as victims and the spectator as voyeur or by-stander. How might we appropriate Boal's work to contemporary western theatre practice to promote engagement with complex international issues and awareness of our shared responsibility towards human rights - in spite of cultural and geographical distance from the issues presented? What action can be taken? Graffiti on the streets of Athens last summer declared: ‘Our grandparents were refugees. Our parents were migrants. We have become racists’ (unknown 2016). How can theatre be a revolutionary voice to address these global and national questions?