• Grease and sweat: Race and smell in Eighteenth-Century English culture.

      Tullett, William; King's College London; History Department, King’s College London (Taylor and Francis, 2016-07-04)
      From 1690 to 1800 texts printed in England linked racial difference and foul odour through understandings of occupation, food, cosmetics and sweat. Even by the end of the eighteenth-century racial odour was represented as a labile, culturally and environmentally determined characteristic. This article traces how the social ‘use’ of olfactory stereotypes, particularly their links with cosmetics, food, and odorous spaces, determined the mobilization of explanations for and attitudes to racial scent. It argues that ideas of race should not be considered monolithic or described in terms of narratives that posit a divide between the body/culture, but that racial stereotypes should be understood as collections of traits, of which smell was one, with distinctive histories.
    • Green fingered.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Birmingham Open Media, 2015)
      In partnership with Birmingham Pride Festival. The exhibition explores the possibility that those of homosexual persuasion are more likely to have a visceral impact on the cultivation of plants. During studies of communal lesbian gardeners throughout the 1970’s, German botanist Dr. Gerda Haeckel observed accelerated growth, crop abundance and overall increased vegetational health. Green Fingered investigates the territory of this research and visually interprets its findings through a series of specially commissioned artworks. Pherometer (2015) is a site specific suspended device that purports to measure the gradient of ‘ARQP’ (Atmospheric Responsive Queer Pheromones) in its vicinity through sensory plants attached via complex wired conduits. The Seed Series (2015) meanwhile is a collection of eight photographic portraits of some of Haeckel’s original subjects and their finest vegetable specimens. Trans Tent (2015) is an immersive, freestanding installation structure, akin to a hothouse and occupied by flora that respond to interaction through vibration and sound. Within it features a continually evolving kaleidoscopic audiovisual instructional guide to the rudiments of successful queer botany and futuristic predictions to the sustainability of bio produce. Marmalade invites the LGBT community to become subjects in the Trans Tent installation during Birmingham Pride weekend (23 to 24 May). This new video artwork incorporates performative excerpts and appropriated material in a parodic and absurdist response to the educational programmes of Haeckel’s era. Green Fingered explores how research in the medical and social sciences has to date focused on trying to identify genetic and psychological traits relating to sexuality. At a time when research continues to find the ‘gay gene’, Green Fingered coalesces aspects of gender and cultural studies with biological science through provocative visual experimentation.
    • Green fingered: Seed series

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Various venues, 2016)
      Double Act: Art and Comedy explores how comedy helps us to shape meaning and negotiate the complexities of everyday life. Humour is a way of binding people together: providing consolation, a sense of shared experience and a powerful weapon of resistance. But, what we find funny can also be cruel, hateful, establishing symbolic boundaries that divide people into distinct groups, setting those with power against those without. The show draws together artists from diverse cultural and political contexts, each sharing an interest in humour as a resource to animate their art practice and to connect with an audience.
    • Green fingered: Seed series.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Arquipelago Centro de Artes, 2017-09)
      The Laughable Enigma of Ordinary Life explores how comedy is important in shaping meaning, helping us negotiate the complexities of everyday life. What we find funny can be cruel, hateful, establishing symbolic boundaries that divide people into distinct groups, setting those with power against those without and vice-versa. But it is also a way of binding people together: providing consolation, a sense of shared experience and a powerful weapon of resistance.
    • The growing demand for education in Saudi Arabia: How effective is borrowing educational models from the west?

      Mirghani, Taiseer M.; University of Derby (Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2020-11-12)
      The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) considers education a top priority, and more emphasis has been placed on this following the 2016 announcement of Saudi Vision 2030. Since then, the country has witnessed several economic and social changes. As a result, the Kingdom has initiated a plan to invest in human capital through education to diversify its economy and increase employment. This includes educational reform with regard to primary and secondary education geared toward preparing students for higher education and the workplace. However, several factors may hinder the successful execution of this plan. This report will provide insights into factors such as cultural dimensions, learning profiles, the English language proficiency gap, and information on borrowing educational models from the West. It will also include some suggestions and recommendations to enhance teacher education programmes so that positive educational reform may be achieved effectively.
    • Guest talk: Be your dog.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Live Art Development Agency, 16/05/2018)
      Shaun Caton’s Prancing Poodles and Preposterous Pugs is a visual tour through some of his extraordinary collection of vintage and historic photographs, and an illustrated talk exploring the animal as performer for the camera, live audience, and the collective creative imagination. Looking at bizarre photographs of animals both dead and alive, Shaun will evince their forgotten stories and pinpoint the human relationships within a performance context. Jack Tan’s Four Legs Good is a live revival of the medieval animal trials, where animals who had committed some offence were charged in court, prosecuted and defended by barristers, and sentenced in full hearings before a judge. In advance of the first sitting of the Animal Court at Compass Festival 2018 in Leeds, Jack will give a presentation about the Animal Court and offer advice to all dogs present who may have fallen foul of the law on how to bring or defend a case. Angela Bartram’s Be Your Dog explores relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept that two companions are necessary for a functional co-species co-habitation. The project saw participants and their dogs attend workshops to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection, and strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other and to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. She will talk about Be Your Dog and her other work with animals including the significance of dog/human cohabitation at the end of life, using dog walking as a way to engage community, and giving access to animal theory to animals themselves. Artist and researcher Sibylle Peters will facilitate conversations.
    • H.E. Careers & Employability Services’ use of resources: Summary report

      Artess, Jane; Shepherd, Claire; International Centre for Guidance Studies; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
    • Hand on heart

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      An Illustration created for Rankin Photography Studio, to promote British Heart Foundation, “World Heart Day” An international art project with creatives from around the world, to raise awareness of the global fight against heart disease through the use of social media.
    • The Hastings sound fountain

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent Unviersity (FACT, Liverpool, 2015-07)
      The term ‘ Performing Data’ was first used by the artist Dr Rachel Jacobs and became the title of Caroline Locke’s research residency at Nottingham University. The Performing Data Project was developed by an interdisciplinary group of HCI (Human, Computer, Interaction) researchers, artists and creative technicians based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute. The Hastings Sound Fountain was developed as part of this project and residency. Locke makes works that ‘Perform data’, revealing data to an audience in various embodied forms - sometimes slowly, sometimes live, to elicit emotions, engage the imagination, extend understanding and to inspire an audience to reflect. Caroline makes links to our natural world and finds ways to expose the beauty in nature. She is keen to find innovative ways of communicating scientific and environmental research to a public audience. The Hastings Sound Fountain at FACT was controlled by data being sent LIVE from Hastings Pier. A sensor on the end of the pier is recording the rise and fall of the sea level and the levels trigger the rise and fall in the sound frequencies being sent to the Fountain. As the sensor tracks the rise and fall of the sea, frequencies sweep through the Sound Fountain, causing ripples and waves on the water surface. A visualisation of the live data and footage of the sea beneath the sensor is projected or viewed on a monitor close to the fountain. Locke contributed to a series of workshops, talks, and events, which were scheduled to facilitate visitor understanding at FACT in Liverpool in July 2015. The Hastings Sound Fountain was exhibited as part of these events.
    • HE in FE: vocationalism, class and social justice

      Avis, James; Orr, kevin; University of Huddersfield (Informa UK Limited, 2016-03-03)
      The paper draws on the Wolf (2015) report (Heading for the Precipice: Can Further and Higher Education Funding Policies Be Sustained?) and other quantitative data, specifically that derived from HEFCE’s Participation of Local Area (POLAR) classifications. In addition it explores key literature and debates that associate higher education in further education (HE in FE) with the pursuit of social justice. This enables an interrogation of conceptualisations of vocationalism as well as a consideration of its articulation with class and gender. Whilst the paper is set within a particular and English socio-economic context, it addresses issues that have a much broader global significance. The paper argues that whilst HE in FE has limited traction in facilitating social mobility it does serve as a resource in the struggle for social justice.
    • Head space and Dark days.

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Broken Grey Wires, 26/02/2018)
      Broken Grey Wires is an ongoing investigation into art and mental health by developing a dialogue with leading contemporary artists. Two screen-printed illustrations,Head Space and Dark Days are included in an artist book Psycho published by Broken Grey Wires.
    • Hearing Without Ears

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Georgia Institute of Technology, 22/06/2014)
      We report on on-going work investigating the feasibility of using tissue conduction to evince auditory spatial perception. Early results indicate that it is possible to coherently control externalization, range, directionality (including elevation), movement and some sense of spaciousness without presenting acoustic signals to the outer ear. Signal control techniques so far have utilised discrete signal feeds, stereo and 1st order ambisonic hierarchies. Some deficiencies in frontal externalization have been observed. We conclude that, whilst the putative components of the head related transfer function are absent, empirical tests indicate that coherent equivalents are perceptually utilisable. Some implications for perceptual theory and technological implementations are discussed along with potential practical applications and future lines of enquiry.
    • Heart sensing sound fountain

      Locke, Caroline; The University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (FACT, Liverpool, 2015-07)
      The term ‘ Performing Data’ was first used by the artist Dr Rachel Jacobs and became the title of Caroline Locke’s research residency at Nottingham University. The Performing Data Project was developed by an interdisciplinary group of HCI (Human, Computer, Interaction) researchers, artists and creative technicians based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute. The Heart Sensing Sound Fountain was developed as part of this project and residency. The previous work Sound Fountains, where sound is visualized through water has been developed so that audiences can engage in their own unique and sometimes very personal experience with the Sound Fountain, using their body data to make changes within an installation environment. The audience (or 2 participants) are asked to place their fingertip on top of the heart shaped sensor, to hold in place for as long as they like to see what happens to the Sound Fountains. The sensor locates the participant’s heart rate and their pulse triggers tones, which are sent to the Sound Fountains. They watch as the waves synchronize with their own beating heart. The sculpture involves live performance on many levels. An element of performance is at the end of the data flow in the water but also between the two individuals facing each other and the dialogue that occurs between them. The surrounding audience watch as the two participants become performers. Perhaps there is a feedback loop as participants attempt to slow down their heart rate or it speeds up with levels of engagement/excitement. The activity is part of a long period of original and significant research and development. Locke’s research, in its wider sense, reflects on the relationship between the spectator and the performer and the opportunities to blur their respective roles within Contemporary Art Practice. It investigates ways in which a spectator can engage more in the work through direct interaction. For example, spectators became performers and integral to the work by triggering sensors within the exhibition space, allowing their presence to orchestrate changes within the installation.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      A paper was delivered remotely at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference at Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius, via two performing 'bodies'. The 'script' for these bodies was exhibited in the Performance Ephemera exhibition as a paper document at Practice Gallery, University of Worcester. The paper abstract for Vilnius: The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries (displaced)

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (2015-09)
      Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami and "Here and There: Two Works, Ten Countries" for The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place (Vilnius).This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami acting as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. The work distances the performers bodies, despite their being ‘present’ as audience through Skype and mobile phone. It explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant. The paper displaced the authors: one was in her living room whilst the other was at the conference, yet only one spoke. The text in Irish was delivered from the 'script' by the author in her home, whilst the other gave her role to a conference delegate at the start of the session. A role he had no idea he would take prior to walking in the room and meeting her invite. The author present at the conference documented the event from the back. Both authors answered questions afterwards.
    • Here and There: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (22/05/2015)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. In this paper we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This paper explores the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of this dynamic seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here and there: two works, ten countries.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Vilnius Academy of Arts, 2016)
      The presence of the performing body is central to the experience of live art. It is this distinctive quality that enables an audience to engage with an unmediated work that incorporates contingencies of site and response. Here we will discuss two works by Bartram O’Neill (the authors’ collaborative name) that address the myth of presence through an interrogation of ‘liveness’ and what it constitutes in art practice when reliant on technological means. This specifically relates to the performance using remote and scripted bodies at The Body: Out of Time and Without a Place conference in Vilnius 2016. In 2013 Bartram O’Neill performed "I, I am, I am here, I am speaking here" as part of Performa 1, Art Basel Miami (USA). This was performed remotely, from the U.K. through two ‘bodies’ in Miami. Unlike the theatrical tradition of script, rehearsal, interpretation etc. this work required these ‘bodies’ to act as channels and ‘puppets’ for the performers in the UK. Using text messaging and Skype, the UK based ‘performers’ and authors of the work communicated to the audience in Miami through their Miami based translators. Meanwhile the UK authors listened to the performance through a telephone connection with an audience member, and thereby being both performers and audience of their work. Bartram O’Neill participated in “O/R” in the streamed Low Lives 4 Networked Performance Festival. From an empty gallery in Nottingham, UK, the pair performed at 2am GMT to an open laptop on the floor, reaching audiences in the USA, Japan, Trinidad & Tobago, Australia, France, Colombia, Norway, and Aruba, between 8- 9pm the calendar day before, depending on location. These works incorporated not just distance, but also time difference - in the former the performers were in a living room surrounded by their diurnal domestic trappings and in the latter they performed in the middle of the night having walked through deserted streets to occupy a gallery devoid of life. 'Both works distanced the body of the performer, who was in fact ‘present’. This text offers the script for the performance, which opened up and explored the possibilities, complexities and contingencies of the dynamic of present and absent bodies and artistic agencies, thus seeking to analyse what it is to be presented as ‘live’ when geographically distant.
    • Here’s looking at youse: Understanding the place of yous(e) in Australian English

      Mulder, Jean; Penry Williams, Cara; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Derby (Springer, 2020-08-31)
      This chapter further documents the place of yous(e) in Australian English (AuE) by analyzing occurrences in Australian literature taken from the Macquarie Dictionary’s OzCorp. Firstly, we substantiate that in AuE yous(e) has developed a singular usage alongside the plural. Analysis of the reference in 308 tokens within our subcorpus of literature finds 40% clearly have a singular referent and that such forms occur in just over half of the texts. Secondly, we provide an analysis of its social evaluation as a stigmatized form by examining its utilization in the voices authors give to their characters. Focussing on texts with high use, we uncover yous(e) is linked both to particular ‘types’ and to certain fictional worlds/milieus. In both cases, the authors draw on understandings of it as Australian and working class, with recognition of its claimed Irish origins only (potentially) indirectly indexed.
    • Higher Education Academy Fellowship

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (2014)
      Having a lifelong interest in knowledge and learning, I view the claims and practices of education and higher education practices with active and interested skepticism, which comes out of a profound optimism – that what we have now is not the best we could have. Higher education should always be in the best interests of the individual being educated, tempered by the interests of society at large; above all, education should do no harm. It seems to me that this “bottom up” approach, whereby improving the thinking abilities of individuals improves the behavior of whole societies is the primary reason for the expensive activity of education. Economic research indicates correlations between education and state prosperity (Berger and Fisher 2013) though benefits of increased productivity may not necessarily be equally distributed. Furthermore, the causal mechanisms at play are not finely elucidated.
    • Higher/degree apprenticeships and the diversification of transitions in England

      Esmond, Bill; Centre of Educational Research and Innovation, University of Derby (2019-03-21)
      The relationships between apprenticeship and higher education vary internationally: unlike countries whose apprenticeships and TVET offer tertiary vocational progression, post-school education in England is dominated by universities. Professional or technical additions to the higher education system have generally conformed to the norms of established universities. Apprenticeships at higher levels now contribute to moves to create a second tertiary pathway, with degree apprenticeships now offering both a work-based route and a qualification at bachelor level. Concerns about access and permeability between ‘technical’ and ‘academic’ routes provided the basis for a study of possibilities for ‘bridging’ between work-based and existing higher education provision. The four examples studied succeeded in their primary aim of supporting higher progression but were less effective in supporting permeability across these education pathways. A deeper recognition of the differences among students and their knowledge is suggested as a precondition of effective bridging between formal or implicit sectoral divides.