• From surround to true 3-D

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; Vaughan, John; University of York (Audio Engineering Society, 1999-04)
      To progress from surround sound to true 3-D requires an updating of the psychoacoustical theories which underlie current technologies. This paper shows how J.J.Gibson’s ecological approach to perception can be applied to audio perception and used to derive 3-D audio technologies based on intelligent pattern recognition and active hypothesis testing. These technologies are suggested as methods which can be used to generate audio environments that are believable and can be explored.
    • Further education learners' prior experience of career education and guidance: A case study of Chesterfield College.

      Woolly, Amy; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 2015-10)
      This article explores further education (FE) students' prior experiences of careers education. The research draws on and extends the limited literature that exists around career support in further education. A mixed methods case study was used to explore students' experience of careers work prior to attending Chesterfield College and to examine the implications of this for the college's provision of career support. Findings indicate that the majority of students had limited contact with careers workers prior to their arrival at the college and, in instances when they had contact, often had a negative preconception of this contact. These findings are discussed with reference to the college's careers education provision and the wider implications for the sector.
    • Future First: Alumni in the Curriculum Evaluation 2015

      Artess, Jane; Hooley, Tristram; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (Future First, 2017-01)
    • The future of student success

      Walker, Ben; Manchester Metropolitan University (2019-03)
    • Gardens and gardening

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2009)
      The garden has been an informing metaphor for geographical thought for sometime and as an affective material object and gardening as a process in the figuring and refiguring of space. It has represented an ideal environment and culture, a rather pre-cultural, pre-human state in a number of world religions, and continues to reappear in contemporary geographical discussions of the sacred. These leitmotifs of human geography are significantly theorized through ideology, discourse, and power, where ‘the garden’ becomes iconic. Signifying identity as well as status, cultural capital and social difference, as well as social/cultural relations, the garden and ways of gardening emerge as expression. A more complex conceptualization of the garden and gardening emerge in debates concerning consumption, commodification, and identity. In recent decades, the garden as artifact has been increasingly transformed to gardening as practice and as significant in developing critical conceptual approaches to a range of ‘new’ cultural geographies. These shifts and developments accompany the increasing geographical interest in process, practice, and performance. The ‘nature’ dimensions relating to, and perhaps informed by, gardens and gardening emerge in new ways in terms of the conceptualizations of nature where significance and meaning may emerge through practice, and in relation to the nonhuman; and debates concerning the ethical and moral in human geography, including shifting symbolism of the garden and of gardening in relation to war and peace. These developments in human geographies have been enmeshed with wider humanities and social science thinking and beyond these, from art theory and social anthropology to environmental debate.
    • The GASP project: Guitars with ambisonic spatial production.

      Werner, Duncan; University of Derby (2016)
      The GASP 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance’ project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. GASP is an ongoing project where research into guitar performance utilising multiple individually processed string timbres, generated by our multichannel guitars, in conjunction with virtual guitar processing software, and processed ambisonically, provides scope for alternative performance and production techniques; more information on the GASP system at: http://tinyurl.com/GASP-Derby
    • GASP v2: Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance

      Werner, Duncan; Wiggins, Bruce; Box, Charlie; Dallali, Dominic; Hooley, Jack; Middlicott, Charlie; University of Derby: Creative Technologies Research Group; University of Derby: Department of Media and Perfoming Arts (2016-06)
      The 2016 GASP v2 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance' project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. This poster was funded through the ‘Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme’ (URSS) and presented at the University of Derby Buxton Campus 12th Annual Learning & Teaching conference on Monday 4th July 2016. The poster was also utilised as a contribution to the Creative Technologies Research Group (CTRG) ‘Sounds in Space’ symposium held at the University of Derby on 28th June 2016, at which three pieces of multichannel guitar recordings were demonstrated.
    • Gathering career wisdom from Facebook and other social media

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (CASCAID, Loughborough University, 2011)
      Tristram Hooley (Head of the International Centre for Guidance Studies – www.derby.ac.uk/icegs) discusses why careers professionals and their clients should be interested in social media.
    • Gdansk: national identity in the Polish German Borderlands

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Pluto Press, 1989)
      A study of National Identity in the Polish-German Borderlands
    • Gender: Stories and Lies: debunking myth and determining reality

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
    • Girls like that

      Lane, Kit; University of Derby (2015-02)
      A variety of source material was used including original photographic and video images, computer generated imagery and Creative Commons licensed images. Extensive use was made of projection mapping techniques. A wide-screen image was created at a short throw distance by edge-blending two projectors.
    • Good looks and good practice: the attitudes of career practitioners to attractiveness and appearance

      Yates, Julia; Bagri, Kiren Kaur; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-10-20)
      Empirical evidence attests the impact that career image has on objective career success, yet little is known of how career practitioners conceptualise and operationalise this information. This article presents the quantitative findings of an online survey of career practitioners (n = 399, 74% female, 89% white and 75% from the U.K.) exploring their attitudes and practices towards issues of appearance and attractiveness. Career practitioners who participated in this survey acknowledged that beauty, self-presentation and interpersonal skills influence career success, and 96% of them considered conversations about career image as part of their professional remit. The career practitioners felt relatively comfortable and well informed in their discussions in this arena, but would welcome further guidance and training to inform their practice. Ethical and practical implications for the profession are considered.
    • Government, policy, and the role of the state in secondary education (Mexico).

      Aguilar-Nery, Jesús; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Graduate Careers in the Post-Brexit World

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2016-07)
      Tristram Hooley, Professor of Career Education at the University of Derby, offers a prognosis on Brexit’s effect on the graduate labour market. He argues that careers guidance should play a role in bringing about more equality in the aftermath of Brexit and in empowering the generation of young people whose voices were not heard in the referendum.
    • Grease and sweat: Race and smell in Eighteenth-Century English culture.

      Tullett, William; King's College London; History Department, King’s College London (Taylor and Francis, 2016-07-04)
      From 1690 to 1800 texts printed in England linked racial difference and foul odour through understandings of occupation, food, cosmetics and sweat. Even by the end of the eighteenth-century racial odour was represented as a labile, culturally and environmentally determined characteristic. This article traces how the social ‘use’ of olfactory stereotypes, particularly their links with cosmetics, food, and odorous spaces, determined the mobilization of explanations for and attitudes to racial scent. It argues that ideas of race should not be considered monolithic or described in terms of narratives that posit a divide between the body/culture, but that racial stereotypes should be understood as collections of traits, of which smell was one, with distinctive histories.
    • Green fingered.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Birmingham Open Media, 2015)
      In partnership with Birmingham Pride Festival. The exhibition explores the possibility that those of homosexual persuasion are more likely to have a visceral impact on the cultivation of plants. During studies of communal lesbian gardeners throughout the 1970’s, German botanist Dr. Gerda Haeckel observed accelerated growth, crop abundance and overall increased vegetational health. Green Fingered investigates the territory of this research and visually interprets its findings through a series of specially commissioned artworks. Pherometer (2015) is a site specific suspended device that purports to measure the gradient of ‘ARQP’ (Atmospheric Responsive Queer Pheromones) in its vicinity through sensory plants attached via complex wired conduits. The Seed Series (2015) meanwhile is a collection of eight photographic portraits of some of Haeckel’s original subjects and their finest vegetable specimens. Trans Tent (2015) is an immersive, freestanding installation structure, akin to a hothouse and occupied by flora that respond to interaction through vibration and sound. Within it features a continually evolving kaleidoscopic audiovisual instructional guide to the rudiments of successful queer botany and futuristic predictions to the sustainability of bio produce. Marmalade invites the LGBT community to become subjects in the Trans Tent installation during Birmingham Pride weekend (23 to 24 May). This new video artwork incorporates performative excerpts and appropriated material in a parodic and absurdist response to the educational programmes of Haeckel’s era. Green Fingered explores how research in the medical and social sciences has to date focused on trying to identify genetic and psychological traits relating to sexuality. At a time when research continues to find the ‘gay gene’, Green Fingered coalesces aspects of gender and cultural studies with biological science through provocative visual experimentation.
    • Green fingered: Seed series

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Various venues, 2016)
      Double Act: Art and Comedy explores how comedy helps us to shape meaning and negotiate the complexities of everyday life. Humour is a way of binding people together: providing consolation, a sense of shared experience and a powerful weapon of resistance. But, what we find funny can also be cruel, hateful, establishing symbolic boundaries that divide people into distinct groups, setting those with power against those without. The show draws together artists from diverse cultural and political contexts, each sharing an interest in humour as a resource to animate their art practice and to connect with an audience.
    • Green fingered: Seed series.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Arquipelago Centro de Artes, 2017-09)
      The Laughable Enigma of Ordinary Life explores how comedy is important in shaping meaning, helping us negotiate the complexities of everyday life. What we find funny can be cruel, hateful, establishing symbolic boundaries that divide people into distinct groups, setting those with power against those without and vice-versa. But it is also a way of binding people together: providing consolation, a sense of shared experience and a powerful weapon of resistance.
    • The growing demand for education in Saudi Arabia: How effective is borrowing educational models from the west?

      Mirghani, Taiseer M.; University of Derby (Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2020-11-12)
      The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) considers education a top priority, and more emphasis has been placed on this following the 2016 announcement of Saudi Vision 2030. Since then, the country has witnessed several economic and social changes. As a result, the Kingdom has initiated a plan to invest in human capital through education to diversify its economy and increase employment. This includes educational reform with regard to primary and secondary education geared toward preparing students for higher education and the workplace. However, several factors may hinder the successful execution of this plan. This report will provide insights into factors such as cultural dimensions, learning profiles, the English language proficiency gap, and information on borrowing educational models from the West. It will also include some suggestions and recommendations to enhance teacher education programmes so that positive educational reform may be achieved effectively.