• Flirting with space: thinking landscape relationally

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2013-04-26)
      For over a decade landscape has been exemplary of the critical debates between representational and so-called non-representational theories affecting cultural geographies. At the same time discussions concerning mobility contest the familiar emphasis upon the habitual and situated character of landscape and its role in the work of representations. This article offers a contribution to the growing awareness of a need to try and engage these debates surrounding landscape across geographical, anthropological, cultural and art theory amongst others. It considers different debates on landscape through the notion of spacing particularly in terms of how we understand artwork and representation, insistently in comparison with wider kinds of practice. Landscape is considered as the expressive-poetics of spacing in a way that makes possible a dynamic relationality between representations and practices both situated and mobile. Keywords art practice, landscape, performativity, poetics, spacing
    • Florian Roithmayr, the authority of other scientists.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Motinternational, 2015)
      Essay to accompany Florian Roithmayr’s shows at MOTINTERNATIONAL and Site.
    • Folklinguistics and social meaning in Australian English.

      Penry Williams, Cara; La Trobe University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-09-12)
      Folklinguistics and Social Meaning in Australian English presents an original study of Australian English and, via this, insights into Australian society. Utilising folklinguistic accounts, it uncovers everyday understandings of contemporary Australian English through variations across linguistic systems (sounds, words, discourse and grammar). Focusing on one variation at time, it explores young speakers’ language use and their evaluations of the same forms. The analysis of talk about talk uncovers ethnic, regional and social Others in social types and prevailing ideologies around Australian English essential for understanding Australian identity-making processes, as well as providing insights and methods relevant beyond this context. These discussions demonstrate that while the linguistic variations may occur in other varieties of English, they are understood through local conceptualisations, and often as uniquely Australian. This book harnesses the value and richness of discourse in explorations of the sociocultural life of language. The findings show that analysis attending to language ideologies and identities can help discover the micro–macro links needed in understanding social meanings. The volume explores a wide range of language features but also provides a deep contemplation of Australian English.
    • Forge

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. The ‘Forge’ installation was part of the DerwentWISE ‘Pulse’ project and was installed in partnership with Quad, Derby. The collaborative work will be developed further through planned engagement with a range of national and international locations and historical narratives, with particular reference to industrialization and the societal impact of technological development.
    • Forsøk å be noen som ser stygge ut om å ta en ansiktsløfting

      Hooley, Tristram; Lillehammer University College (Utdanning.no, 2016)
    • ‘The Found Footage Composite: History, Hybridity and the Animated World’

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/09/2016)
      The paper will describe a practical methodology designed to deploy found footage, animation, digital compositing and special effects techniques to critically evaluate the ontological status of found footage in reference to materiality and truth-value. In this framework, the construction of non-real spaces that synthesise animation and found footage are explored for their potential in describing alternate histories with regards to memory and ideology. How can the material aspects of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past?
    • Fractured pasts: Found footage collage and the animated documentary

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/06/2017)
      The paper will present a body of practice-led research within experimental documentary and animation that interrogates the use of found footage as a historiographical strategy. The research examines the capacity of found footage collage in articulating the layered temporalities present in the formation of collective recollection. How can the materiality of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past? The methodology draws from visual ethnography with regards to intersubjectivity, multivocality and the immaterial aspects of human experience. The approach aims to challenge notions of unitary meaning, objectivity and truth in historical representation. Can the fragmented, hybrid aesthetic of the moving collage render the partial and irregular experience of remembering, evoking the contingent and furtive conditions of personal and collective pasts? The work deploys appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses. The paper will describe temporal structures that privilege simultaneity, overlap and layering in constructing unstable images that foreground a dialogical conception of the past. How can found footage collage and animation, as a historiographical practice, expand the language of non-fiction films that address memory and time?
    • Freedom of speech in a therapeutic age

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-05)
      Roy Harris (2009) and Adrian Pablé (2012) have argued that integrationists, in their philosophy and in their linguistics, have a Socratic approach to freedom of speech that sees vigorous and robust debate as the foundational freedom. Everything must be put to the test of criticism. Every citizen has a moral duty to defend freedom of speech and every academic has a duty to defend freedom of speech as the foundational freedom of the academy. Freedom of speech has historically been restricted and controlled at various times dependant on the contingent concept of human being at any time. Authoritarian attempts to control speech and antipathy to human freedom to assent or dissent from established opinion are familiar. In contemporary therapeutic culture restrictions on freedom of speech appear more kindly but are more authoritarian. Seeing human beings as diminished, vulnerable or mentally unwell provides the basis on which the state and its institutions can intervene and regulate freedom of speech and freedom to hear. Bans and censorship are now seen to be necessary to protect vulnerable individuals rather than to protect the cherished but untested ideas of the new moral elites. The kindliness of the new authoritarianism makes it harder to challenge without the challenger being seen as a victimiser. In the contemporary therapeutic university the right to assent alone is allowed. Even body language, sighs and ironic utterances are questionable. The therapeutic university is becoming the silent university. As the university is the embodiment of societal attitudes to freedom of speech what we are seeing is the creation of the silent student and future citizen who dares not speak; not for fear of being harmed but for fear of harming vulnerable others. References Harris, R. (2009) Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education, British Journal of Educational Studies, 57 (2) June 2009: 111-126. Pablé, A. M. (2012) Excommunicated on the grounds of Harrisy: Roy Harris, Linguistics and freedom of speech, in Ashley, LRN & Finke, W (Eds.). Language Under Controls: Policies and Practices Affecting Freedom of Speech: Selected Papers from the International Conference, September 23-24, 2011. East Rockaway, NY: Cummings & Hathaway: 1-12.
    • The Frequency Of Trees

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (Yorkshire Sculpture Park, 2014-10)
      The Frequency Of Trees is part of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) Open Air collection and has an extremely large footfall (700,000 visitors during 2015/16). Public audiences engage with the research directly when walking through the grounds of the park. Spectators discuss how sound moves and how the body responds. The sculpture comprises of a series of 12 tuning forks tuned to the frequency of different trees within YSP: Oak, Horse Chestnut, Beech and the Cedar of Lebanon in the Formal Garden. The frequency of sound is measured by counting the number of occurrences of an event per unit of time. By measuring the number of times a branch or leaf on a tree moved a certain distance within a set time frame, Locke was able to equate tree movements with Hertz readings, the unit used to measure sound. After striking the tuning forks, spectators are required to listen for the resonating frequencies that continue long after the initial strike – these are the pure musical tones that exist after the initial high overtones recede. The commonly stated human hearing range is 20–16000Hz thus the 16Hz fork appears to have no sound, however , spectators can still enjoy the sight of sound by watching the fork resonate. The work is used as generator for learning on various educational programmes at Yorkshire Sculpture Park .
    • Friends and feelings: the appropriation of Facebook by Irish radio stations to enhance audience engagement through affective media experiences

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Lund University and University of Westminster, 2016)
      Radio audiences have become increasingly interested in engaging with radio stations via social network sites (SNS), finding radio station Facebook pages as a source of information, entertainment and as a channel for audience participation. Meanwhile in an attempt to remain viable in an increasingly digital mediascape radio station management have appropriated Facebook and other SNSs to create a broader media experience for their audiences. This has involved moving radio stations beyond simple audio broadcasters to become digital media producers, adding visual and highly interactive dimensions to their arsenal. The adoption of Facebook by the Irish radio industry has been driven by commercial forces with station management engaging with audiences via Facebook to help grow online and on-air audience numbers with the goal of increasing revenue. Using the Irish radio industry as a case study this research found that some radio stations are more adept at engaging with their audiences than others. Those stations that employ the medium effectively are connecting with audiences on an emotional level, evoking feelings and instigating affective communication between users. The focus of this research resides at the nexus of radio industry trends, audience engagement experiences and radio production practices, all of which have changed as a result of the adoption of Facebook and other SNSs by the Irish radio industry. This research involved in-depth analysis of three radio stations including commercial and public service stations broadcasting to local, regional and national audiences. The methodology included analysis of Facebook page content, interviews with industry professionals and an audience survey of N=419 radio listeners/Facebook users. This research forms part of the author’s doctoral thesis which explores the social, economic and cultural implications of Facebook use by Irish radio stations and their audiences.
    • Friendship and peer cultures in childhood (Mexico).

      Fritz Macias, Heidi; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • From dialectics to dancing: Reading, writing and the experience of the everyday life in the diaries of Frank P. Forster

      Feely, Catherine; University of Manchester (Oxford University Press, 2010-03)
      This article is an examination of the reading and writing practices of Frank Forster (1910-98), a casual labourer and Communist autodidact, as revealed in the diaries he kept between 1934 and 1938. One of the most influential texts Forster encountered during this period was The Positive Outcome of Philosophy, written by Joseph Dietzgen (1828-88), a German tanner who had also independently developed a Marxist philosophy of dialectical materialism. Dietzgen's work on the relationship between thought and experience appealed enormously to autodidact sensibilities. Recording his reading at the same time as other activities, such as cinema attendance and dancing, Forster was able to reshape Dietzgen's ideas so that he could apply them to the issues most immediately important to him, particularly the pursuit of social and sexual experience. This seemingly idiosyncratic understanding of ‘the dialectic’ can only be understood in the particular context of Forster's life, locality and time. His diaries deserve wider attention as compelling evidence of how one individual combined theory with everyday life to create his own form of ‘self-help’.
    • From genre to zenre

      Callow, Christos; Birkbeck, University of London (Birbeck, University of London, 2014)
    • From pillar to post

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-03)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. ‘From Pillar to Post’ was a digital animated film displayed at Strutt’s Mill Belper using projection-mapping technology as part of the launch for the refurbished and remodeled exhibition spaces.
    • From Pillar to Post (and back again): animation projection mapped onto the basement pillars of Strutt’s North Mill, Belper for a Museums at Night Event.

      Shore, Tim; Bosward, Marc; Mellor, Shane; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-05)
      From Pillar to Post (and back again) was projected onto eight of the monumental mill-stone grit piers in the basement of Strutt’s North Mill - the pillars are all that is left of Jedediah Strutt’s first mill of 1786 that burnt down in 1803 – they form the foundation of the ‘new’ mill built in 1804. The abstract animation was composed of short sequences of choreographed blocks of light and colour that was mapped on to the blocky rectangular geometry of the pillars. The animation playback was synched to an audio track using Isadora software. Visitors were able to walk between the pillars affecting the animation by breaking the projection light beam and changing the animation sequences by adding their own audio in the form of shouting, clapping and stamping. Pillar to Post (and back again) created an immersive animation that the audience were able to walk into and affect by interrupting the audio track by making random sounds that changed the order and play of the animation. The audience were able to perform the animation.
    • From surround to true 3-D

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; Vaughan, John; University of York (Audio Engineering Society, 1999-04)
      To progress from surround sound to true 3-D requires an updating of the psychoacoustical theories which underlie current technologies. This paper shows how J.J.Gibson’s ecological approach to perception can be applied to audio perception and used to derive 3-D audio technologies based on intelligent pattern recognition and active hypothesis testing. These technologies are suggested as methods which can be used to generate audio environments that are believable and can be explored.
    • Further education learners' prior experience of career education and guidance: A case study of Chesterfield College.

      Woolly, Amy; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 2015-10)
      This article explores further education (FE) students' prior experiences of careers education. The research draws on and extends the limited literature that exists around career support in further education. A mixed methods case study was used to explore students' experience of careers work prior to attending Chesterfield College and to examine the implications of this for the college's provision of career support. Findings indicate that the majority of students had limited contact with careers workers prior to their arrival at the college and, in instances when they had contact, often had a negative preconception of this contact. These findings are discussed with reference to the college's careers education provision and the wider implications for the sector.
    • Future First: Alumni in the Curriculum Evaluation 2015

      Artess, Jane; Hooley, Tristram; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (Future First, 2017-01)